Click here for important information about Computing.net.

Computer can't start, keeps restarting, CPU fan spins fast

Hewlett-packard Hp pavilion dv4-2169nr e...
November 29, 2020 at 10:07:52
Specs: Windows 7 / Windows XP, E5200, 4GB DDR-II RAM
Hi guys, my mom's rather old desktop machine is having the following issues:

Every time I try to start the computer, the CPU fan starts spinning very fast and starts making a loud whining noise. The problem is that the machine is ice cold and the CPU is not overheating, so it should not be spinning that fast. Still, the fan keeps spinning at a very high speed - as if the CPU is overheating.
Several seconds after I turn the PC on, the machine shuts down by itself and then restarts again by itself. It keeps shutting down and restarting on its own.

I unplugged most devices - the two hard drives, the GPU, the CD ROM device, just to eliminate them from the equation. Then I started the machine without them. Same problem - the CPU fan spins like mad.

I touched the CPU radiator - it is very cold, so again - the CPU is not overheating.

I don't know what could be causing this. Obviously this is a hardware problem.
Anyone with a clue or a solution to this?
Thanks!


See More: Computer cant start, keeps restarting, CPU fan spins fast


#1
November 29, 2020 at 10:43:38
Make and model of computer might/will be useful here?

The PSU may be giving out?


Reply ↓  Report •

#2
November 29, 2020 at 10:56:54
Thanks for your reply, @trvlr.
Funny thing is that I assembled this PC myself many years ago, but I can't remember any of its specs anymore... All I can remember is that the CPU is an old Celeron and the GPU is MSI R5450.

I will see what can be done about the PSU.


Reply ↓  Report •

#3
November 29, 2020 at 11:03:20
If you open the case can you see any details on the motherboard showing its make/model number?

There are several regular here who are more across self/home builds etc. than am I, so hang about for more savvy input


Reply ↓  Report •

Related Solutions

#4
November 29, 2020 at 11:59:48
Here is a photo of the motherboard. It is an Asrock.
Yes, it is dusty in there...

https://i.postimg.cc/XvMDS2t9/asroc...

____________________________


Reply ↓  Report •

#5
November 29, 2020 at 12:24:35
You might blow out the dust from the psu and the cpu especially... use canned compressed air...

message edited by trvlr


Reply ↓  Report •

#6
November 29, 2020 at 13:59:48
"Yes, it is dusty in there..."
Make sure you are very thorough when cleaning the power supply.

Information about cleaning computer components, including the power supply.
https://youtu.be/gcUSl9K2bZs
https://www.gamingscan.com/how-to-p...
https://www.technibble.com/computer...
https://www.computerhope.com/cleani...
https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/tu...
https://www.brighthub.com/computing...


Reply ↓  Report •

#7
November 30, 2020 at 04:03:12
Three comments regarding the fan and cooling fins:

1) If the cooling fins are cool, it could mean that heat from
the CPU isn't reaching them, and is building up in the CPU.

2) The fan normally starts out at top speed, then slows down
to whatever speed the BIOS tells it to slow down to. Your
BIOS is apparently no longer working.

3) When the bearings of a fan become worn, the fan typically
becomes noisy, and loud. If your fan has several years of use,
it may need to be replaced.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


Reply ↓  Report •

#8
November 30, 2020 at 05:46:18
Thanks, I removed the on board battery to reset the BIOS.
This did not solve the problem.

Reply ↓  Report •

#9
November 30, 2020 at 06:15:34
Is this a plug in cpu, which I seem to recall where once quite common?

If so, perhaps - with all power removed - unplug it and see if you can check it’s many pins for corrosion, oxidisation etc.? If present then while cpu is out its socket, blast compressed air (from a can) into the socket. Then firmly replace the cpu, then remove it and blast air into socket again. Reinsert cpu firmly a third time, then remove and blast air again. Then reinsert cpu firmly again, and try the system again with just bare one - no drives etc.?


Reply ↓  Report •

#10
November 30, 2020 at 07:15:14
I just managed to start the computer. It works without flaws (for now), but the CPU fan is still rotating at a very high speed.
I checked the temperature and it is 43 degrees C for both cores - pretty cold. So the CPU is not overheating.
Here is a screenshot of the temperature readings:

https://i.postimg.cc/8kfFbMvc/CPU-T...

Something else is making my CPU fan go mad... What could it be?


Reply ↓  Report •

#11
November 30, 2020 at 08:25:11
OK, I spoke too soon. I did a restart and the the PC started shutting down and rebooting itself again.

Reply ↓  Report •

#12
November 30, 2020 at 08:28:48
Did you try the RAM cleaning/reseating routine?

Any prospect of you checking and monitoring psu outputs?


Reply ↓  Report •

#13
November 30, 2020 at 09:19:15
The cpu fan speed is controlled by the bios as long as it's connected to a monitored power connection. It could be that fan is failing and sounds louder or is louder because you have the case open and the sound isn't being muffled. It's probably nothing to worry about.

If the power supply has a 110/220 voltage switch make sure it's in the correct position. DON'T GUESS! And don't switch it when the power cord is attached.

Examine the motherboard for damaged electronics--especially 'puffy' capacitors surrounding the cpu socket.


Reply ↓  Report •

#14
November 30, 2020 at 09:30:12
Random reboots are often due to an overloaded or failing power supply, but that doesn't explain the CPU fan running at high RPMs.

DAVEINCAPS' comment about the capacitors is worth looking into. Your pic of the board isn't super sharp but it looks like there's several swollen caps just above the PCIE slot, to the right of the ASRock logo. If that's the case, the motherboard will have to be replaced, unless you're good with a soldering iron & have access to a supply of caps. Here's a couple pics of bad caps:
https://www.techjunkie.com/wp-conte...
https://i0.wp.com/www.markdigital.c...

message edited by riider


Reply ↓  Report •

#15
December 2, 2020 at 02:07:39
You may solve this problem then soon another will appear.
Think the system is going "end-of-live" ;-)
Electronic components have an arbitrary lifespan; some go sooner than others....

Reply ↓  Report •

Ask Question