Computer beepes and turns off at 27 C

January 7, 2010 at 04:00:49
Specs: Windows XP 2002, SP 3, P4 3 GHz/1 GB
Before I had reformatted my computer, it used
to
overheat at around 50 C(and it rarely reached
that
temperature). Now it turns off beeping
continuously at 27 C only . We then have to
unplug the computer.

See More: Computer beepes and turns off at 27 C

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#1
January 7, 2010 at 04:12:58
We need to know the beep eg.Two shorts and 1 long beeps.

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#2
January 7, 2010 at 04:53:26
It beeps continuously. It never stops beeping I think( I never
counted but it beeps more than 8 or 9 times and continues) and
we have to unplug the computer from the mains supply. When
beeping the monitor turns off but the CPU keeps on beeping.

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#3
January 7, 2010 at 04:54:42
50C is NOT overheating. I hope you didn't reformat thinking that would fix it? And obviously 27C is no where near overheating, in fact, it's very low for a P4. Are you getting these temp readings from the BIOS or from a software program?

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Related Solutions

#4
January 7, 2010 at 07:10:04
On my CPU, there is a screen which displays the temperature of
the computer. We had reformatted it because it had too many
viruses and while reformatting we also partioned the disk as it
wasn't partitioned before. While the disk was being divided it had
also turned off in the similar way couple of times.After the
reformatting of the computer, it turns off at around 27C.

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#5
January 7, 2010 at 08:00:01
System temp or cpu temp?

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#6
January 8, 2010 at 04:29:58
It is the CPU temperature.

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#7
January 8, 2010 at 06:56:29
Boot into the BIOS screens and go to PC Health. Set the shutdown temp to 70/75c. Save and exit.

How do you know the temperature is at 27 when the computer locks up? Your CPU fan may be malfunctioning or the insides may be dusty/dirty. Blow out with canned or compressed air.

DO NOT use a vacuum. Also blow out the power supply from both ends. This will be messy so you may want to move the tower outside or to garage.


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#8
January 8, 2010 at 10:34:23
As I said in response 4, there is a screen in my CPU that
displays the temperature. OK I'll try and see if it works. But there are some problems. I've never opened up my CPU and cleaned it. I don't have compressed air cannisters, in which type of shops can we get them? Which parts are to be cleaned and can I use a 100% cotton cloth to clean certain parts? I'll also try to set the BIOS temperature too. Thanks

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#9
January 16, 2010 at 11:30:55
I've also one more question, how do we set this BIOS shutdown
temperature to what temperatures you've suggested?

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#10
January 16, 2010 at 13:11:23
"On my CPU, there is a screen which displays the temperature of the computer."

The term CPU is frequently misused. Your computer case is NOT a CPU. The CPU - Central Processing Unit - is the processor on the mboard, the usually removable largest most complicated integrated chip on the motherboard.

""System temp or cpu temp?""

"It is the CPU temperature".

I've never come across a temp display on a case that is the CPU - processor - temperature. A CPU is NOT the computer case. The temp inside the case is often called the System temp, and that's probably what is being displayed. The temp display is probably not even connected to the mboard.

Open up the computer case. Boot the computer to make sure the CPU (processor) fan is spinning. That fan is usually on a large heatsink - the processor is underneath the heatsink. If it doesn't spin, the computer will shut down automatically in a very short time.
If it doesn't spin, assuming the power supply is okay, it must be replaced before you use the computer again.

Shut down the computer.
Disconnect the AC power to the case, either by unplugging it's cord, or by switching off power to the cord.

If the cpu fan/heatsink has mung (dust, lint, etc.) on it, clean it off, but DO NOT use a vaccuum cleaner to do that (they produce a tremendous amount of static electricity when running, and anything connected to them can discharge that to your components) - use canned air, or an air nozzle if you have access to an air compressor, or an artist's brush that can be used in small spaces, etc. It may be difficult to clean the top of the heatsink under the cpu fan - the most likely place to have mung on it - and the bottom side of the cpu fan blades unless you remove the fan. If you have a case fan, clean that too if it needs it.
Also check the fan and heatsink on the video card if it's got that, and any case fans if you have one or more. If they're filthy, clean them.

Make sure the power supply fan spins. You should be able to feel at least a slight amount of air coming out of it's grille at the back of the case when the comuter is running. Also check that for mung. If it's dirty, the easiest way to clean it is blow air into it from both ends, or you could remove the PS, remove it's cover, and clean it some other way.
........

The current CPU (processor) temperature is shown in the mboard's bios Setup settings somewhere - often under Hardware Monitor or similar - along with the System temperature and often another temperature, and current voltage readings.
If you want to have that info in Windows, you can load a program that can show you that at any time. Sometimes with brand name systems that's already been installed and is there in your programs. If you know which mboard make and model you have, the manufacturer often has such a program you can download in the downloads for your model or elsewhere, or if you have a generic system, such a program is often on the CD that came with the mboard for you to load.

Some bioses have a setting where you can specify at what critical temp the mboard warns you the processor is too hot - e.g. by beeping - and/or at what max temp the mboard will automatically shut down at, but the default may not suit your processor and be too high or too low (it wouldn't be 27 C in any case) . If you want to fine tune that, the Critical (max without damaging it) and Max (beyond which the processor is a goner) temp your processor can endure can be looked up on the processor manufacturer's web site for the model



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#11
January 27, 2010 at 09:09:24
Thanks a lot. My fans do work. I've got two fans. I've even tried
counting the beeps but it exceeds over 18 deen-doon and then I
had just disconnected it from the mains. Should I have kept
counting? What are the maximum beeps the CPU makes? Also
the beeps were of same lengths and pitches.

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#12
January 27, 2010 at 09:21:24
Did you enter the BIOS (setup) and check PC Health as advised above?

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#13
January 28, 2010 at 11:06:48
There is one problem. I've never dealt with BIOS settings. I don't
know how to work with it. :-(

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#14
January 28, 2010 at 11:32:29
Sooner or later you need to learn. Watch your screens at start up for instructions on how to enter the BIOS (setup) screens. Once at the first page just read the instructions there to learn how to move about.

No mouse in the BIOS. You use the keyboard. Primarily the Enter, pageUp & Dn, arrow keys, Esc, F10 key. Just read the prompts and don't make more than one change each time you enter the BIOS screens. Be sure to save when exiting if you HAVE made any changes.

If the worst happens and you set something and the computer won't boot all you need to do is to reset the BIOS with a jumper or by removing the coin battery on the motherboard while the computer is unplugged.

To just check the PC Health you don't need to make any changes. Just go to the correct screen and when there write down what you find. Then post it here.


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#15
January 29, 2010 at 05:59:12
When I boot my computer. Many pages show up. The first
page has something written on the top left corner saying
something "Inno 3D...Tornado...NVIDIA Corp....." and much more but this
was only thing I was able to read. It's a short paragraph there.
Then another page turns up which has the logo of MSI on the
top left, "8Xtreme series" is written on the center, and Intel
Pentim 4 on the bottom right. Then another page turns up with
a lot of text on it. Next, the Windows XP loading page
appears and the computer boots up. Which page allows me
to enter BIOS and what button do I press?

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#16
January 29, 2010 at 08:32:38
First of all hitting the pause or scroll lock keys will freeze the screen until you hit a key again.

You should look for something like "to enter setup press F*".


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#17
January 29, 2010 at 14:12:27
"Product: Golden field / 6162b"

Are you in, or did you buy this in, Uzbekistan?
Is English not your primary - first - language?

There are free online language translators on the web we and you can use if you find our posts hard to understand - we would need to know which language you know and can read the best.

Golden field
In Uzbekistan, in Russian
http://www.goldenfield.uz

Computers, etc.

model 6160, in Russian
http://www.goldenfield.uz/index.php...

Translated roughly to English:
http://ca.babelfish.yahoo.com/trans...

Click on Main Thing at left - Popular - Model 6160

I see nothing there about manuals, very little support info.

Your 6162b model may be one in the 6160 series of models

Do you have a manual for your model?
A printed one, or on a CD that came with the computer?

Also, there may be a manual already installed in your Programs somewhere - Golden field somerthing - Manual - Owner'sGuide, User's Guide, etc. .

If you do, the key you press to get into the bios Setup is probably in that.

If you don't
- if it appears, the line that tells you which key to press is very early in the boot. "Press xxx key for Setup" or similar.

- if you don't see that, it can be any key or key combo - common ones are Del, or F1, or F2.

Press the key repeatedly, don't hold it down,
- while you see the line "Press xxx key for Setup" or similar is on the screen.
- or - repeatedly while booting, don't hold it down, after you hear one beep from the mboard.

You can view current voltage, fan sppeed, and temperature readings by using a free progam you download from the web and load in Windows, but you can't change settings in the bios with that.

E.g. Search the web for : Speedfan .


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#18
January 30, 2010 at 01:42:09
My English all right. I was transferred to Kazakhstan for 3 years
period and there I bought this computer. Currently I'm in Edinburgh and I have no problems in
understanding your language. I don't understand a single word in www.goldenfield.uz.
The thing is that I don't know very
much about computers. By the way is your Speedfan download reliable?

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#19
January 30, 2010 at 05:15:13
Speedfan, like all third party add on monitors can be wrong if it fails to identify the correct sensors. This shouldn't be a problem because Speedfan can't damage your computer and probably will show accurate readings. Get it at the link below.

http://download.cnet.com/SpeedFan/3...


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#20
January 30, 2010 at 08:53:05
Thanks a lot for the Speedfan link.
I will enter my BIOS soon. In my computer guide book, I saw
that I have "Phoenix Award CMOS BIOS" or something like that.
So any information about it?

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#21
January 30, 2010 at 09:26:34
Phoenix is a brand, not a specific BIOS file.

Like asking if I have any information on Ford or Chevy.

You appear to be very apprehensive about entering the BIOS screens. I suggest you install Speedfan and set it to run in the system tray. That way you can monitor things in real time.

In the interim boot into the BIOS and look around but don't make any changes at this time. Familiarize yourself in how to move around in there.

Your current issue may be heat related or not. I am curious to know where you have been getting system/CPU temps in the past if you haven't entered the BIOS screens.

Have you recently cleaned out your case? I suggest using either canned or compressed air to blow out all the dust/dirt. Don't use a vacuum cleaner. brushes, etc. are a waste of time, IMO.

Be sure to also blow out the power supply from both ends.

This can be very messy so I suggest you move the case to a location where that isn't an issue.

After blowing things out be sure to check the cables, RAM, cards, etc for tightness. Best to just reseat those items. Be careful not to disturb the heat sink. If you move it at all you should then remove it and clean off all thermal compound then apply new according to CPU specific instructions.


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#22
January 30, 2010 at 10:16:15
I didn't know that Phoenix was a brand. I thought it was a kind of BIOS or something. Never mind that. I am just too worried about accidantly doing something wrong while entering or working with BIOS.

I have been getting temperature readings from a screen on my
CPU. I guess it is system temperature.
I strongly feel that temperature is the cause of this problem
because it never turns off at temperatures below 25C, no
matter whatever kind of work I do.
Since the temperature in this city is around 1C these days,
my computer is 14C when I boot it up .
It will always turn off when the reading exceeds over 25.5C,
especially when I watch videos.
I haven't cleaned my CPU case yet but I have opened it up
and seen it from inside. It doesn't seem that dusty but I will surely clean it in a fortnight.

I am still a bit nervous about the speed fan. It says that it can't be held responsible if it causes damage to your system. When I did start downloading it, it stopped and a message appeared "this download can damage your computer", so I discarded it.


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#23
January 30, 2010 at 11:44:55
You are worrying too much.

Click on my name here and see how many posts I have participated in.

Speedfan is safe. Those disclaimers are like the one on the McDonalds coffee cups. Not responsible if you burn yourself.

27 C is not too hot. Your CPU can typically withstand 80 C.

One of the things we wanted you to check in the BIOS is the temperature shutoff setting. I didn't think it could go down to 27C but it appears that is what is going on. Simple setting that one setting higher will allow you to run the computer without worrying about it shutting down.

As I told you above. Even if you screwed up and set something totally wrong no damage would come to the computer. It may not boot is all. In that case you just remove the coin shaped battery from the motherboard while the computer is unplugged to reset all the BIOS values to defaults. Then the computer will boot again.

If you insist on being that afraid then get someone that knows about computers to do it for you.


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#24
January 30, 2010 at 12:38:05
Do you work in the oil or natural gas industry, or are you doing a job related to that by any chance?
I live in Alberta in Canada - there's a lot of people working here in those or in occupations that supply or depend on that.
Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Newfoundland, in particular, all have a lot of that.
........

"I didn't know that Phoenix was a brand. I thought it was a kind of BIOS or something"

It is.

It's a brand of bios software. There are only a few - Phoenix , Award, and AMI are the most common ones. Phoenix merged with Award some years back. You often see one of those brands on the screen while booting, often along with a specific bios version number. Phoenix bios versions are commonly used on mboards made by Intel, including OEM versions of their mboards that are often supplied to brand name system builders. Most if not all other mboard makers use an Award or an AMI bios version.
Each particular overall bios version of a brand is a generic "software framework" - that "software framework" is modified by, or by somone for, the maker of the mboard, or the brand name system builder, to suit the particular mboard model's main chipset chips the and I/O chip, sometimes other chips as well, so that the bios can properly interface (~ communicate) between the hardware and the operating system. That's the specific bios version for your mboard. When you flash the bios for a model, you're modifying the specific bios version, not the overall bios version, so it's very important to make sure you flash with a bios version for your specfic model, and often, the specific Revision or Version of the mboard model.
Sometimes brand name system bios versions don't display the actual maker of the bios siftware on the screen while booting , or they give it their own name.
Brand name system bios versions are often at least a bit different from the bios version used by the mboard manufactuer. It can be a huge mistake to flash the bios of a brand name system with the mboard manufacturer's version, when the mboard being used is identical to the manufactuer's retail model, especially if they use a different brand of overall bios version, and visa versa. E.g. HP and Compaq brand name systems often use Phoenix bios versions - the mboard manufacturers other than Intel usually use Award or AMI bios versions.
Sometimes, especially common for laptops, there are far fewer things you can set in the bios Setup in brand name builder bios versions.
Brand name system builders usually use their own specific version of the bios, and the key you press to get into the bios Setup is often different from that used by the mboard maker's bios version, if the mboard manufacturer has an identical retail model.
Sometimes smaller brand name system builders don't bother to modify the specific bios version on the mboard model - it's identical to that for the retail model of the mboard maker's, and the key you press to get into the bios Setup is the same as the mboard maker's.
In most cases, the mboard was not made by the brand name system builder - it was supplied to them by a major mboard manufacturer. Sometimes it's an OEM mboard model in a brand name system - made only for brand name system builders - the mboard manufacturer has no support for that mboard model - only the brand name system builder does, if at all.
You/we can often determine who actually made a mboard in a brand name system desktop, but that's usually difficult to determine, or impossible to determine, for laptop mboards.

"I am just too worried about accidantly doing something wrong while entering or working with BIOS."

You have to deliberately choose to Save the changed bios settings, otherwise the settings stay the same as they were before you looked at the bios. As long as you don't absent-mindedly press keys, you can't go wrong. If you're not sure what you're doing in there, ask us, describe what you want to set.
You can't change the current temperature, voltage, and fan speeds in any case - they're generated by sensors on the mboard, and interpreted by bios code to read appropriately. The bios code is often tweaked to make sure those are accurate. SpeedFan and similar software may generate slightly different readings - you can often adjust the settings in the software to have them match the readings you see in the bios.
Speedfan and similar often assume the mboard manufactuer is using the chip makers designated connections for multiple temp, fan, and voltage readings. Sometimes the mboard manufactuer does not adhere to that.
If the labelling for a reading in SpeedFan or simliar for a temp, voltage, or fan rpm is different from in the bios, change the labelling in SpeedFan or similar to match the readings in the bios.

NOTE that if you have or can find a manual for your model, there is often descriptions of what the specific bios version's settings are, and sometimes descriptions of what setting non-default settings do, in the manual. Mboard manufacturer's manuals often have more info about that than brand name system manuals do - sometimes brand name systems have no or almost no info about that in the manual.

OtheHill said:
"No mouse in the BIOS. You use the keyboard."

I've seen a few bioses you can use a mouse in, 486 and up, but they're certainly not common. In that case, sometimes only a PS/2 connected or serial connected mouse will work.
......

"When I did start downloading it, it stopped and a message appeared "this download can damage your computer", so I discarded it."

That sounds like a generic message generated when you attempt to download a file that has certain file extensions, e.g. , if it's got an .exe extensions, because that extension is known to be associated with a type of file commonly used by malware. It's probably auto generated by something built into your internet browser version, or your anti-malware software.

Some email programs do that too when you click on an attachment to an email.

When you are accessing a definately legitimate web site such as the one for SpeedFan OtheHill provided, you can be quite certain the download is not malware - just ignore the message and download it anyway.
In any case, you can scan individual files if you so choose in your anti-malware software, if you're suspicious of them.


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#25
January 31, 2010 at 04:27:37
"865GM3/865GVM2/865PEM3 series"
"MS-7037 (v1.X) M-ATX Mainboard"
is written on my user's guide which might be the model of the
mboard. In the user's guide, it has a chapter about BIOS
Setup. It says ""Power on the computer and the system will
start POST(Power On Self Test) process. When the message
"Press DEL to enter SETUP" appears on the screen, press
<DEL> key to enter Setup.""
I didn't get to see the message, but when my key board did
activate, on the page before Widows XP loading page, I did
press DEL key multiple times. But no luck.

-----------------------------------------

After posting this message, I restarted my computer to give it one more shot. My keyboard only activates on the page which is full of text written in white and has a black background. I again pressed Del key so many times, but nothing happens.


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#26
January 31, 2010 at 04:44:03
Are you using a USB keyboard? If so, try a PS/2 model.

Start continuously tapping the Del key as soon as you start the computer.


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#27
January 31, 2010 at 09:03:42
Make sure you have no bootable disks in drives or bootable flash drives or bootable external drives in USB ports when you press the key to get into the bios - in that case you may be booting from the disk or drive rather than getting into the bios, if pressing any key bootsf rom the disk, which is common.

NOTE that I have noted that if you leave the CD for the mboard manufacturer's mboard inserted while booting, some of them for recent or fairly recent mboarsds will auto start whether or not you press a key - they are loading a bios recovery program - you see plain text on a black screen - make sure there are no such optical disks in drives while booting.

"Are you using a USB keyboard? If so, try a PS/2 model. "

"Start continuously tapping the Del key as soon as you start the computer.'

Repeatedly press Del but don't hold it down.

Your computer is fairly fast - sometimes you need to start pressing the key as soon as the monitor led turns it's enabled color, rather than after the mboard beeps once while booting which is what I usually recommend.
If that doesn't help, try pressing starting right after the mboard beeps once while booting.

Connect it directly to a built in USB port on the mboard at the back of the case - sometimes front USB ports don't work properly because of inadequate wiring between them and the header for them on the mboard.

The bios has to have a setting USB legacy device or USB keyboard, or simlar, enabled in order for you to be able to access the bios Setup with a USB keyboard - that's enabled by default in most if not all bioses for recent and fairly recent (yours) mboards, but someone may have disabled that. If it's disabled, you can only get into the bios with a PS/2 keyboard - you enable the USB setting, then Save bios settings to retain it.
NOTE that a USB to PS/2 adapter will NOT work unlessthe =keyboardcame with it, or it's a"combo" keyboard that is wired up and has the circuits for both a USB and PS/2 connection.

A wireless keyboard may NOT be able to enter the bios Setup in any case.



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#28
February 1, 2010 at 10:59:40
I use USB keyboard but I accessed it.I bashed DEL key as
soon as my computer booted up. It was shocking to see the
temperature. Here is what I saw-

Chassis Intrusion Detect Disabled
CPU Warning Temperature 60 C
Warning Beep Enabled
Current CPU Temperature 59 C
Current System Temperature 28 C
Current CPU Fan Speed 2185 RPM
Shutdown Temperature 70 C
CPU Smart Fan Temperature 40 C
CPU Temperature Tolerance ( C) 2

Then why has this problem started since I've reformatted my
computer? It never turned off like this before and I had been in
countries way hotter than this place.


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#29
February 1, 2010 at 11:24:32
Obviously you were reading system temps before, not CPU temps.

Either the insides of your case are dirty, especially the fins on the heat sink or the heat sink may not be setting firmly on the CPU. Pins or clips can come loose. If you can move the heat sink readily then something is wrong.

The only thing that Windows may be able to control is the speed of the fan.

Blow out everything inside the case using either canned air or a compressor. DO NOT use a vacuum. Be sure to also blow out the power supply from both ends too.

It may be necessary to re-seat the heat sink and/or repair the retainers. If the HS is removed all thermal compound must be thoroughly cleaned off and new thermal compound applied according to CPU specific instructions.

Canned air can be purchased at office supply or computer stores.


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#30
February 1, 2010 at 11:40:39
Sorry to put a spanner in the works.

Perhaps the temp is a red herring.

Could it be faulty RAM?

memtest86 can test the RAM

http://www.memtest86.com/

PS speedfan is safe.


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#31
February 1, 2010 at 14:11:40
clive

Are you saying that you think the BIOS temps could be wrong because of bad RAM? I don't think so.

It appears that Ghuggi was monitoring the temperature of the system, which, if course, doesn't have any correlation to the CPU temps. The system alarm is set for 60c and the temperature when monitoring at idle in the BIOS was 59c and shutdown is set for 70c. This indicates to me that something is amiss with the cooling.


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#32
February 1, 2010 at 14:45:09
: OtheHill,

No, I don't think bad RAM is causing the temp problem.

I think the fact its turning off at 27, is not relevant.

27 is not very high. But its beeping, I just thought, forget the
temp, perhaps something else is causing it to switch off.

I could be wrong.


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#33
February 1, 2010 at 14:49:01
The 27c reading is NOT for the CPU but for the system. Evidently the OP didn't have a reading on the CPU and thought the 27c WAS the CPU temperature.

Look at response #28 to see what the real temps and alarms are.

I suspected this way back in my response #7.


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#34
February 2, 2010 at 08:33:15
First of all, is my computer fan speed slow?
Is this just a
coincidence that my CPU has started overheating easily since
I've reformatted my computer? The CPU never overheated before even when the system temperature reached 50 C.
According to the laws of physics,
heat transfers from a region with higher temperature, to a region
with a lower temperature. Then why was there so much
difference between the System temperature and CPU temperature?
So, what is this thermal compound?
I will surely have to clean it now.

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#35
February 2, 2010 at 12:38:01
The processor (CPU) is small and generates a lot of heat for its size. The heat sink/ fan apparatus is designed to extract that heat from the CPU and disperse it into the surrounding air (inside of case), or in some cases duct it to the outside of the case.

There are three factors that come into play. The first is the extraction potential of the heat sink/ fan. We can assume this is the correct size for your CPU. Next is the bond between the face of the CPU core and the face of the heat sink. Although both appear to be smooth there are minute variations in both surfaces. So to get the maximum heat transfer a paste or pad that melts is used in between to make the bond 100%. The third item is the ability of the heat sink to shed the heat in pulled away from the CPU. That is dependent on fins to radiate the heat. A fan is fitted to the top of the heat sink to help the dispersion.

If the heat sink is dirty the transfer is not as efficient. Or if the fan is not working at all or at less than ideal speed. Lastly the bond between the CPU and heat sink can be broken. That can happen because excess heat has ruined the thermal properties of the compound or if the mechanical connection has failed somehow.

That was a long explanation but thorough. The remedy is to blow out the dirt and to refit the heat sink after cleaning all the old thermal compound off and applying new according to the specific instructions for that particular model of CPU. Too much or too little is no good.

As I stated above the fan may not be spinning at full speed, although any software that controls that should speed it up at those temperatures. Generally the fan will get noisy if failing. There are bearings in it.

If I had to guess I would suspect dirt/dust and possibly a failed mechanical connection.

Your processor may be cooled by the fan in the power supply and connected by a duct. The same air cools both the CPU and the power supply in that case. Some Intel rigs are set up that way.

Have you opened the case yet?


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#36
February 3, 2010 at 08:51:57
I have opened it once but it is so complicated from inside. There
wasn't much dust there too but I assume there would be some in
places that can't be seen that easily. I don't know much about
the heatsink and the amount of thermal paste required. Where
can we get this thermal compound and how do we apply it? Will
blowing out the dust solve the whole problem? Also, what is the
recommended fan speed?

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#37
February 3, 2010 at 10:24:55
The CPU fan on the computer I am working on presently is running at 3550RPM. The speed is dependent on several factors so not all fans run the same speed. Could be higher or lower.

One thing you can look at is to see if the CPU fan is turning at all. Also, feel at the rear of the case to determine if air is being discharged out of the back of the power supply. The power supply is where the power cord connects to the PC.

If the fan seems to be turning fairly fast (you can't see the actual blade tips) then the problem might be that the heat sink has come loose from the motherboard so it is not making good contact with the CPU.

Thermal paste is not expensive and can be purchased at computer shops, or at radio shack. Look at the link below to see how to apply the thermal paste. Before applying new paste you need to clean off all the old residue. A solvent like lacquer thinner,oil free nail polish remover or isopropyl alcohol will work.

The video and Intel instructions are for a new retail processor which has thermal material already on the heatsink. Therefore you need to add that step into the procedure. There are a couple of more links to help with the thermal paste.

Note how there are pins holding the basket to the motherboard. One or more of those pins may have come loose.

http://www.intel.com/support/proces...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dSFO...
http://www.maximumpc.com/article/ho...
http://www.pctechguide.com/tutorial...


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#38
February 3, 2010 at 11:32:32
I recommend you DO NOT attempt to remove the heatsink from the cpu unless changing the cpu fan does not cure your cpu overheating problem !

In most cases there's nothing wrong with the thermal paste, thermal pad, or thermal grease, between the heat sink and the cpu, especially if you or anyone else has NOT fiddled with installing a cpu heatsink since you got the computer !

If thermal paste (a.k.a. thermal compound) was used, the kind that has additives in it sometimes it hardens over time and it's as if it was crazy glued to the cpu - when you attempt to remove the heatsink, the heatsink may be stuck very strongly to the cpu, and even if you unclamp the heatsink, press straight down towards the cpu while you wiggle the heat sink back and forth, it may NOT come unstuck from the cpu !

It's probably a cpu fan problem. If cleaning it and it's heat sink does not result in the CPU temp going down, you need to replace the cpu fan.

It may be difficult to clean the top of the heatsink under the cpu fan - the most likely place to have mung on it - and the bottom side of the cpu fan blades unless you remove the fan.

NOTE that the cpu fan must blow towards the heatsink and cpu. For all the computer fans I've seen, you should see the entire fan blade when the fan is installed properly - no support struts or center non moving support part in the way of seeing the fan blade. Some fans have a arrow molded into the plastic on the side of the fan housing that shows the direction it blows air.

If the cpu fan doesn't spin when the computer is booted, if you're sure the power supply is working okay, don't use the computer until you have replaced it !

If it spins too slowly when the computer is booted, and/or if it makes rattling or screeching noises, most likely to be noticed when the computer has cooled to room temp, has not been used for a while, and then is started up, the cpu fan's bearings are failing - the cpu is likely to overheat as a result of that if it can no longer spin it's full speed - replace it as soon as you can.

If in doubt, replace the fan !
A fan that has two ball bearings or two ceramic bearings is better than a fan with one ball bearing and one sleeve bearing, or two sleeve bearings (although "sealed lubrication" or similar sleeve bearings are almost as good as two ball bearings).
If the description or label on it says ball bearing without the s, it's likely it has one ball bearing and one sleeve bearing.

If replacing the cpu fan with the same one or better does not cure the cpu overheating problem, THEN you could try removing the heat sink from the cpu, but BE AWARE that if thermal compound was used, you may NOT be able to get the heat sink unstuck from the cpu, unless you pull straight up on the heatsink, which is NOT recommended, because in most cases the heat sink is STILL stuck to the cpu in that case - the cpu is pulled out of it's socket ! Even then, you probably will NOT be able to remove the heat sink from the cpu ! Been there, done that !

If a thermal pad or thermal grease was used between the heat sink and the cpu, the heatsink WILL come unstuck from the cpu, when you unclamp the heatsink, press straight down towards the cpu while you wiggle the heat sink back and forth.

A used thermal pad must be scraped off, and replaced with another thermal pad, which aren't easy to find, or with thermal compound or thermal grease.

I use thermal grease - e.g. silicon thermal grease, silicon dielectric compound, or similar - it has no additives, it's whitish, translucent, almost clear when in a thin layer - it NEVER hardens, unlike some thermal compounds.


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#39
February 3, 2010 at 12:05:26
I can concur with tubesandwires that this should not be taken lightly.

That said, it appears that something happened all of a sudden to cause the shutoffs. If you never entered the BIOS screens and changed the alarm and shutoff settings then something happened.

My suggestion always has been to attempt to blow out any dust/dirt before trying anything more invasive.

If you try to blow out the case and that doesn't solve the problem perhaps it would be best to consult a computer repair shop.


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#40
February 3, 2010 at 13:59:59
"CPU Warning Temperature 60 C
Warning Beep Enabled
Current CPU Temperature 59 C
Current System Temperature 28 C
Current CPU Fan Speed 2185 RPM
Shutdown Temperature 70 C "

The default settings in the bios may not be suitable for the cpu you are using. You can change the CPU warning temp, and the Shutdown temp, in the bios Setup. On the other hand, 70 is often a reasonable shutdown temp - your cpu is getting at least that hot, if the mboard is shutting down automatically - and it was not shutting down the mboard previously .

If you RIGHT click on My Computer, Properties - on the first screen you may see the cpu model on the right.
If not, you can use a free third party utility to determine which cpu model you have.
Then you (or we) would go to the cpu manufacturer's web site to determine it's specs, including it's thermal specs. The Shutdown temp should be a little less, say 5 to 10 C, than the absolute max or similar temp for the cpu - the temp above which the cpu starts to be damaged. The Warning temp should be, say, about 10 C below that.


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#41
February 3, 2010 at 16:38:08
Tubes

The issue is that the OP didn't change any BIOS settings and in the past the errant readings they were getting were even higher than 27c (50c) yet the computer didn't shutdown. They had never been in the BIOS screens before.

I am assuming if it shutdown the temp went to 70c. Running 59c while idling in the BIOS is not right. Doesn't matter what CPU they have.


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#42
February 4, 2010 at 09:12:33
Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz, 1.00 GB of RAM
Is this sufficient information about the CPU?
I took another look through my user's manual and saw the fan installation
instructions. It didn't mention anything about the thermal compound. These
were the instructions:-

"As processor technology pushes to faster speeds and higher performance,
thermal management becomes increasingly important. To dissipate heat, you
need to attach the CPU cooling fan and heatsink on top of the CPU. Follow
the instructions below to install the Heatsink/Fan:

1. Locate the CPU and its retention mechanism on the motherboard.

2. Position the heatsink onto the reten- tion mechanism.

3. Mount the fan on top of the heatsink. Press down the fan until its four clips
get wedged in the holes of the re- tention mechanism.

4. Press the two levers down to fasten the fan. Each lever can be pressed
down in only ONE direction.

5. Connect the fan power cable from the mounted fan to the 3-pin fan power
connector on the board.

MSI Reminds You... If your Intel Pentium 4 proces- sor supports 3.0GHz
(and up), please be sure to use a multi-direction fan to make the heatsink
exhausts air towards the voltage regulators on the board easier. Multi-direc-
tion fan has better performance in CPU overheating."

These are the exact instructions.
The CPU case has only been opened once that too recently. So there is no
chance of someone fiddling with it. Do all CPUs really need thermal
compound? It's only been 5 years since I've got this computer. even if there
was any thermal compound, would it dry up so that quickly? I can also feel
some nice warm air coming out from the holes near the power supply.


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#43
February 4, 2010 at 10:07:25
I expressly mentioned that this step is NOT necessary when installing a NEW heat sink because thermal compound is already attached to the new heat sink.

You are re-installing the heat sink and therefore MUST clean off any residue and apply new thermal paste. I thought I explained this thoroughly in #37.

To recap, new heat sink comes with thermal compound on it. You can't reuse it after once mounting and removing it.


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#44
February 4, 2010 at 12:29:19
Enough about the heatsink ! Don't remove it unless someone fiddled with it after you bought the computer, or unless cleaning the heatsink / cpu fan, or replacing the cpu fan, doesn't help !

A new heat sink often has a thermal pad - sharply defined definite edges, a consistant thickness of thermal material - it's already stuck onto the heatsink - you remove protective paper or plastic on the bottom of the pad itsef just before you install it on the cpu.
Sometimes there's nothing on the bottom of the heatsink - in that case thermal compound or thermal grease is included with the heatsink.
Usually you get the new heatsink in a combo fan / heat sink unit; you can get cpu fans separately.
......

I've encountered several heatsinks I could not remove from a cpu because thermal compound (that has additives in it) had been used. In all cases the thermal bond between the two was fine - a proper fan / heat sink combo still cooled/cools the cpu fine.
In one case I wanted to change the cpu, and resorted to pulling straight up on the assembly of heat sink / cpu, since I couldn't release the cpu socket lever, which is the case with heat sinks that are larger on the bottom where the lever is than the cpu socket - a common situation with other than old mboards/cpus (pre 2000 or so). In that case I didn't damage the cpu socket or the cpu, but I don't recommend that - at the very least some cpu pins might be pulled off. I could not get the cpu off the heatsink even after I removed the assembly, at least not without destroying it. I even tried (carefully) hammering several single edge razor blades between with one assembly - I broke the razor blades. The strength of the bond of the heat sink to the cpu was much stronger than the force required to pull the whole assembly straight up out of the locked zif cpu socket.

I've had no problem so far removing a heat sink when a thermal pad was used, or when thermal grease (that has no additives) was used, when I unclamped the heat sink, then pressed down towards the cpu while twisting the heat sink back and forth to break the bond to the cpu. Thermal grease is a lot easier to break the bond of.

Of the three ways, I recommend using thermal grease (no additives in it, translucent whitish, almost clear in a thin layer) - it never hardens, can always be re-used, at least, that of it that is not contaminated with dust or whatever.


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#45
February 4, 2010 at 13:24:10
I agree that you should first attempt to lower the temperatures by blowing out the case and checking the fan speed.

Now that you know how to enter the BIOS screens just check it there. Keep us updated.

So to recap. Check the fan speed and CPU temperature now. Blowout the case. check both the fan speed and the CPU temperature. If your fan speed is low then you might consider changing the fan. The problem is the fan air capacity was originally sized to match the capability of the heat sink. Installing the wrong fan may actually make things worse.

I am not as sure as tubesandwires that the heat sink doesn't need to be removed. While I agree that generally the heat sink shouldn't need to be removed, according to your statements the overheating issue happened suddenly. You think it corresponded with the re-install of Windows. This may be the case, but I don't see any correlation of the two events.

If the CPU temperature actually did jump up substantially all at once, that would indicate either a CPU cooling fan failure. The heat sink has been dislodged. Also possible someone tampered with the BIOS settings and has reset some of the values for the CPU at non-standard settings (overclocking).

Does ANY other person have access to the computer other than you? I am asking if there was an opportunity for someone to change some settings?

There are some programs that can change some settings without entering the BIOS screens. I have no idea what program you have/had that monitors the temperature. That could also be a program to change settings.

Those settings are accessable in the BIOS but it may be easier to install a Windows based program that can give the same information without going into the BIOS screens.

Download and run SIW. The CPU info & Sensors listings should tell us if your settings are as they should be. Get SIW at the link below. Very safe program.

http://www.gtopala.com/siw-download...


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#46
February 5, 2010 at 05:57:26
It doesn't really correspond with the re-installation of Windows but to be
specific, this beeping problem happened twice when the disk was being
partitioned. Since then, the problem continues.
No one has access to the computer other than me but I remember that
the guy who had come to fix the computer had opened up the CPU
case. He had reconnected some of the wires from inside and had done
something with the BIOS and the computer booted up! Maybe he
would've done the overclocking thing because the computer booted up
slightly faster than before. Also he didn't touch the heatsink. It can be
that he might have knocked over some dust onto the heatsink from
other parts of the computer or something.
Can it be that I can see the overclocking thing in the BIOS?

-------------------------------------------------------------------

For the thermal compound, isn't the one with the additives better? I
think so because solids are better conductors of heat than liquids. The
atoms in the solids are closer to each other so the heat can be
transferred easily whereas in liquids they're further apart.


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#47
February 5, 2010 at 06:17:29
I will respond from last to first.

Thermal compound comes in two forms, pads or paste. Pads are more user friendly because they are already applied. Pads melt when the system is turned on and turn to the same consistency as the paste. All paste works OK. I doubt you can find aftermarket pads.

I have no idea what the technician did when in the case or the BIOS. He could have bumped the heat sink and dislodged it. That said, you need to take our advice one step at a time.

You now know how to boot to the BIOS screens so do that and record the fan speeds, the CPU temperature, system temperature, any voltages and speed settings you see and then shut down, unplug, and blowout the system as described above.

Then boot into the BIOS again and record the same values again. Post all here for evaluation and possible future procedures at that time. You are fixating on every possibility when not necessary at this time.

As far as the alarms go any stressing of the CPU will make it hotter so prepping the drive could cause the alarm to go off if the system temperature was already near the alarm temperature.

It is possible the tech may have reset the alarm and shutdown values. That doesn't matter at this time though.

We need to determine if dirt, settings or something wrong with the fan/heat sink is the cause of the higher temps. P4s do run hot anyway.

Do you know the history of the computer? Did you buy or have built new?


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#48
February 5, 2010 at 07:51:53
"Did you buy or have built new?"

Response 18
"I was transferred to Kazakhstan for 3 years
period and there I bought this computer"

Again,
- it is probable your problem is the cpu heatsink and fan have too much mung on them, and/or the bearings in the cpu fan are failing and it can no longer spin fast enough. Both are extremely common.
- it's extremely unlikely there's anything wrong with the thermal compound or grease or pad between the heat sink and the cpu (unless the clamp(s) or lever(s) that hold down the heat sink is/are un-latched - extremely unlikely).

Who knows what the technician who trouble shooted your computer did, but it's extremely unlikely he would overclock the computer, or dislodge the heatsink, or remove the cpu heat sink and re-install it. He may have loaded bios defaults because people often fiddle around in the bios Setup, and rather than trying to figure out what might be wrong in the settings that the user might have set, he loaded bios defaults.
Loose connections inside the case, or a poor connection of the ram in it's slots or of cards in slots that has developed over time and/or after having moved the computer from one place to another are a frequent cause of computer problems.
Merely re-seating the ram and cards in slots may make the computer seem a bit faster after the technician worked on it, if a card had a connection problem, or ram was experiencing ram errors before the technician worked on the computer.

The bios Setup settings can easily be set to Defaults, Save settings. In most cases for people who have not fiddled with bios settings, the only things that are non default or that are not auto set by the bios according to your particular ram and cpu are the time and date, or if they use a parallel port, the mode of that port may have been custom set to EPP, ECP, or EPP/ECP, if the bios defaults had them set otherwise (most parallel port devices require one of those modes - EPP usually works fine). If you think the cpu warning temp and shutdown temp might have been set by the technician, make a note of what they're set to now, check them later after defaults have been loaded, but otherwise, if you were to load bios defaults you could be quite certain settings will work fine, and the computer has not been overclocked.


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#49
February 5, 2010 at 08:19:52
tubes

You are not saying anything different than I am except that you are not providing any logical reason why this computer started to overheat all of a sudden. There has to be a reason. My approach is conservative and not in conflict with what you are stating.

Until Ghuggi tries to clean the case out with canned or compressed AND reports the BIOS reading as I suggested in #45 air we can't go any further.


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#50
February 5, 2010 at 08:37:24
I just went to a store and bought this canned spray. So I'll be
blowing away the dust soon. Also, I never knew that we could
build our own Computer.
I took a look at the BIOS screen as soon as I booted up the
computer right now. The CPU temperature was 22 C and
system temperature was 10 C. Fan speed was 2512 RPM.
However these three values keep on fluctuating.
I would shortly carry out the instructions you gave me of
finding the difference between the readings before and after
blowing away the dust. I guess Tubesandwires is correct
about the technician reseating the parts of the case which
made it boot a bit faster.
Is it ok to blow into the heatsink?

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#51
February 5, 2010 at 09:13:12
Those numbers can't be right. 10c is 50F and 22c is about 76F. That should be colder than the room you have the computer in. Something doesn't make sense.

Fluctuation in the readings is normal. Especially the fans.
Be sure yu are reading the CPU fan speed. Some BIOSes can report case fan speeds too.

Yes, you WANT to blow into the heat sink and the fans. Also blow into both ends of the power supply. As I think I mentioned above this will be messy. You may want to move the case before blowing. Don't be afraid to get right in there with the air stream.

If

I don't think re-seating any parts would make it boot faster. Settings in the BIOS can affect the boot speed though.

2500RPM is a typical speed for a CPU cooler fan. Look at the link below to see the variation in cooler fan speeds. Most are even slower than 2500RPM. I am venturing to say the fan will not speed up very much, if at all.

http://www.newegg.com/Store/Categor...


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#52
February 5, 2010 at 11:08:07
See response 38 regarding cleaning the cpu fan / heat sink - you probably need to remove the fan - and checking the cpu fan.

"Those numbers can't be right. 10c is 50F and 22c is about 76F"

If he's got it in a cool room, and if the computer had cooled to room temp, and he looked in the bios right after he booted they may be fine.
My grand aunt used to live in an un-insulated high ceiling ancient stone house in Glasgow, and it was cooler than normal room temp inside all year, unless you spent a lot more money than average to heat it. She wore sweaters all the time.
.....

Ghuggi

The temps stabilize in the closed case / bios after the system has been running 15 minutes or so or more. The cpu temp depends on what you were doing just before you checked the temp. If you just let the computer sit running without you doing anything for at least 15 minutes, then the temp in the bios is the "system idle" value - the lowest it gets when the system has fully warmed up.
.........

"Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz, 1.00 GB of RAM
Is this sufficient information about the CPU?"

Intel® Processor Identification Utility
http://www.intel.com/support/proces...

(Intel) Processor Spec Finder
http://processorfinder.intel.com/

e.g. look up the Sxxxx model at the second place

P4 cpus
http://processorfinder.intel.com/Li...

CPU speed: 3.0ghz Package Type: 478 pin - Filter on selections - 6 possibilities - all 800mhz

Double click on the Sxxxx model there.

E.g.

Thermal Design Power: (Also referred to as Thermal Guideline) The maximum amount of heat which a thermal solution must be able to dissipate from the processor so that the processor will operate under normal operating conditions.

(P4) SL78Z 3.0ghz 800mhz 81.9 C

Thermal Specification: The thermal specification shown is the maximum case temperature at the maximum Thermal Design Power (TDP) value for that processor. It is measured at the geometric center on the topside of the processor integrated heat spreader. For processors without integrated heat spreaders such as mobile processors, the thermal specification is referred to as the junction temperature (Tj). The maximum junction temperature is defined by an activation of the processor Intel® Thermal Monitor. The Intel Thermal Monitor’s automatic mode is used to indicate that the maximum TJ has been reached.

(P4) SL78Z 3.0ghz 800mhz 70 C

Those temps vary somewhat, they're lower for Celeron D's, but if the spec temps for your cpu Sxxxx model are very similar, it appears your present settings in the bios - 60 for Warning, 70 for Shudown, are fine.


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#53
February 5, 2010 at 11:41:36
FYI

"865GM3/865GVM2/865PEM3 series"
"MS-7037 (v1.X) M-ATX Mainboard"

Choose MSI regional site, or Global :
http://www.msi.com/language/
......

E.g.

MSI Global:
http://www.msi.com/index.php

I Searched for MS-7037 at top beside Product Search
http://www.msi.com/index.php?func=s...

3 specific models, 1st one with or without optional gigabit LAN and IEEE1394 (firewire).

Clicking on CPU support shows you the mboard revision as "PCB Version" - it's 1.0A for all of them
"Since BIOS Version" - the minimum bios version that supports all the cpus listed

NOTE that it says: "Product version may vary across regions !"
DO NOT rely on the accuracy of picture of the mboard! I know from bitter experience MSI sometimes uses the wrong picture!

Look at the downloadable Manual for a probably acccurate picture and/or diagram of the mboard !

If you're not sure which mboard is yours, the Drivers are probably fine to use for any of them, of you have the device the drivers are for, BUT the Bios updates MAY NOT BE!

Use this to find the proper downloads for your exact mboard, when you access the internet on your computer:

Live Update Online
http://www.msi.com/index.php?func=d...

I'm assuming you have a MSI bios version. Smaller brand name system builders often do not bother to make a bios version of their own.
If you have a (your system builder brand name) bios version, DO NOT use MSI bios updates - use ONLY a (your system builder brand name) supplied bios update, otherwise your mboard MAY NOT BOOT after you flash!

NEVER flash your bios unless the bios update release notes specifically mention they cure a specific problem you are having, or unless you need a newer bios version to properly recognize a cpu you have not installed yet !
If you don't need a newer bios version to properly recognize a cpu you have not installed yet, or that you have installed but the mboard doesn't recognize properly or the mboard will not boot, then, almost always, flashing the bios WILL NOT cure your problem!
The bios must be flashed when a cpu the mboard's present bios version recognizes already has been installed.
In most cases, all bios update versions include all previous update fixes, so if you need to flash, use the newest non-beta (beta = preliminary, not fully tested) bios version.

Flashing the bios is the riskiest thing you can do to a computer ! Sometimes the flash chip physically fails the first time you try to flash the bios !


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#54
February 6, 2010 at 02:44:41
It's quite cold in Edinburgh and temperature outside is around
2-6 C. I don't turn on the radiators in this room with the
computer to prevent it from overheating.
Also it doesn't take me 15 minutes to enter BIOS, so
temperature doesn't get time to stabilize. The readings I gave
you before, were taken when I turned off my computer after
working on it for around 1 to 2 hours and then turning it on
again after 20 minutes.
The latest readings I gave you were given to you by booting
into the BIOS straight away as I turned on my computer.

I also know only one thing about the CPU that it's 3.0 Ghz.
Where can I get more information that I need to filter the
search?
How do I come to know which BIOS version I have? The
information about the BIOS was given in MSI's manual. The
BIOS shown there was exactly like what I had accessed to.

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#55
February 6, 2010 at 05:18:21
I don't know why you need to know the BIOS version but it should appear on the POST screens at start up.

Did you download SIW as I suggested. everything there is to know about your computer should show in that utility.

http://www.gtopala.com/siw-download...


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#56
February 6, 2010 at 06:14:55
I have installled it but how do I use it? This is what information I got for CPU information-

Property Value
Number of CPU(s) One Physical Processor / One Core / 2 Logical Processors / 32 bits
CPU Full Name Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz
CPU Name Intel Pentium 4
CPU Code Name Prescott
Platform Name Socket 478 mPGA
Revision E0
Technology 90 nm
Instructions MMX, SSE, SSE2, SSE3, HT
Original Clock 3000 MHz
Original System Clock 200 MHz
Original Multiplier 15.0
CPU Clock 3001 MHz
System Clock 200.0 MHz
FSB 800.2 MHz
Core 0 Speed 3000.6 MHz
Core 0 Multiplier 15.0
L1 Data Cache 16 KBytes
L1 Trace Cache 12 Kuops
L2 Cache 1024 KBytes


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#57
February 6, 2010 at 07:22:55
OtheHill

"...you are not providing any logical reason why this computer started to overheat all of a sudden. "

It often seems to be "all of a sudden" when this kind of thing happens, but usually the cpu has been slowly getting hotter over time before that, all along, and the user just didn't notice that.

I think it was probably a matter of the accumlation of the mung on the cpu heatsink and fan had crossed a threshold of there being too much, and/or the deterioration of bearings in the cpu fan had crossed a threshold where the fan can no longer spin fast enough.
.........

Ghuggi

"CPU Full Name Intel(R) Pentium(R) 4 CPU 3.00GHz
CPU Name Intel Pentium 4
CPU Code Name Prescott
Platform Name Socket 478 mPGA
Revision E0
Technology 90 nm"

That's of some use, but SIW apparently can't tell you the specific model of the cpu.

Go here:
The Intel® Processor Identification Utility
http://www.intel.com/support/proces...

Run it when you're on the Golden field 6162b .

It should identify your specific P4 model Sxxxx

Go here
(Intel) Processor Spec Finder set to the P4 cpus, some of which can be used on your computer
http://processorfinder.intel.com/Li...

Set CPU speed: 3.0ghz
Set Package Type: 478 pin
Set Manufacturing Technology: 90nm
click on Filter on selections
- 2 possibilities

Double click on the Sxxxx on a resulting line that is the same as found by the Processor Identification Utility
to see the specific specs.

I appears the Thermal Specification temp specified should be the max setting for the Shutdown temp in your bios, and the Warning temp in your bios should be about 10 C below that.


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#58
February 7, 2010 at 01:45:55
I'll be blowing away the dust today. Here are the readings currently with
dust-
Initial Readings-
CPU Temperature - 22 C
System Temperature - 11 C
Current CPU Fan Speed - 1319 RPM
Vcore(V) - 1.32V
3.3V - 3.34V
+ 5V - 5.10 V
+12V - 11.85V
VBAT(V) - 2.86V
5VSB(V) - 4.99V

Readings after 6 minutes-

CPU Temperature - 53 C
System Temperature - 18 C
Current CPU Fan Speed - 2518 RPM
Vcore(V) - 1.32V
3.3V - 3.34V
+ 5V - 5.08 V
+12V - 11.85V
VBAT(V) - 2.97V
5VSB(V) - 4.99V

I kept a difference of 6minutes to give time to heat up a bit so that the
difference could be noticed.
Tubesandwires, where do I run on that website to get the information on specific model? Othehill, how do I use SIW to know if my computer is overclocked?


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#59
February 7, 2010 at 03:44:09
I blew away the dust and there was a lot in the heatsink. Readings
after blowing away the dust-

Initial Readings-
CPU Temperature - 24 C
System Temperature - 13 C
Current CPU Fan Speed - 1328 RPM
Vcore(V) - 1.32V
3.3V - 3.34V
+ 5V - 5.10 V
+12V - 11.85V
VBAT(V) - 2.86V
5VSB(V) - 4.99V

Readings after 6 minutes-
CPU Temperature - 40 C
System Temperature - 22 C
Current CPU Fan Speed - 1350 RPM
Vcore(V) - 1.32V
3.3V - 3.34V
+ 5V - 5.10 V
+12V - 11.85V
VBAT(V) - 2.88V
5VSB(V) - 4.96V
The CPU temperature remained 39 C for 4 minutes and didn't exceed
this temperature. Is the problem solved yet?


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#60
February 7, 2010 at 08:35:52
Well, it appears you have a setting in the BIOS that allows the CPU fan to run at variable speeds as needed.

I would say that the dust was probably you problem.

While is SIW look at the listing for CPU info. That should show you what the Original System clock and the current settings are.

In the Sensors listing can tell you if the processor voltages are set higher than spec. I can’t say what specs are for your CPU and I wouldn’t worry about that. The CPU info above will tell the story. You can also find fan speeds and temperatures here. That program can be minimized so you can open quickly to monitor in real time.

The memory listing can tell you about the RAM. The summary tells you how the RAM is currently set to run. The listings below show the specs for the RAM in Each memory slot, including the specified voltage.

Just look around in SIW. You can’t make any changes from within the program so you can do no harm. It is an amazing program.

Other useful items are Licenses and Secrets. Try them.

I suggest you just monitor your system for the time being. If the tech made any changes they may have been to set values as they should have been. As far as the case readings for system temperatures goes, it would seem that it is pretty much useless.


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#61
February 7, 2010 at 11:40:38
"Readings after 6 minutes-
CPU Temperature - 40 C
System Temperature - 22 C"

They're fine.
They'll probably get a bit higher before they stabilize.

" Initial Readings-
CPU Temperature - 22 C
System Temperature - 11 C"

"Initial Readings-
CPU Temperature - 24 C
System Temperature - 13 C"

It's certainly not normal room temp wherever you have the computer located.
Are you living in an OLD place?

I live in Canada. It can get much colder than it does in Scotand here - e.g. it was -38 C on one day in December before Xmas, and -46 C at the airport outside of the city, without the slight wind chill being taken into account. The house we live in was built in 1959, it was insulated according to building codes at the time, insulation has been added over the years to the walls in the basement, and in the attic, and we never have the room temp in the house set below 20 C or so in the winter on the thermostat for the furnace, and that's while we're sleeping.

"Current CPU Fan Speed - 1319 RPM"
"Current CPU Fan Speed - 2518 RPM"

"Well, it appears you have a setting in the BIOS that allows the CPU fan to run at variable speeds as needed."

Agreed.

Either that or it happens by means of default bios settings, which may or may not be settable in the bios.

"I would say that the dust was probably you problem. "

Agreed, but, as I said above...

"...if it makes rattling or screeching noises, most likely to be noticed when the computer has cooled to room temp, has not been used for a while, and then is started up, the cpu fan's bearings are failing - the cpu is likely to overheat.." eventually "...as a result of that if it can no longer spin it's full speed - replace it as soon as you can."

Intel supplied boxed set (heatsink / fan combo in a boxed set along with the cpu) cpu fans for Intel cpus I've come across often have one ball bearing, one sleeve bearing, rather than two ball bearings. It would have an official Intel label on the fan blade in that case. I've seen cases where the Intel supplied fan needs to be replaced because the sleeve bearing has deteriorated.


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#62
February 8, 2010 at 09:46:44
Thanks you very much Othehill and Tubesandwires. Now the System
temperature reaches 30 C easily. I guess the heat from the CPU is
being conducted well to the CPU case so System Temperature is
slightly higher.
There are three things that needs to be considered.
First of all, I didn't remove the fan as it seemed to be attached to the
heatsink. I did loosen up the dust on the blades and the surface of the
heatsink with a cotton bud and blasted air to blow them away. Heatsink
looked a lot better after blowing.
Second is the overclocking thing.
Original Clock 3000 MHz
Original System Clock 200 MHz
CPU Clock 3001 MHz
System Clock 200.1 MHz
There is difference of 1 MHz and 0.1 MHz in the clocks. Does it make a
difference?
Third is the CPU thermal specification. Tubesandwires,
"Go here:
The Intel® Processor Identification Utility
http://www.intel.com/support/proces...
Run it when you're on the Golden field 6162b"
I couldn't find where I had to run to get information about the CPU. Can
you please tell like which link do I click on or on which part of the
screen will I see it.
Thanks you.

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#63
February 8, 2010 at 10:13:53
Those frequencies as reported are fine.

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#64
February 8, 2010 at 12:53:27
You're welcome to use our help.

"I couldn't find where I had to run to get information about the CPU. Can you please tell like which link do I click on or on which part of the screen will I see it."

Those two Intel links in Response 57 work fine for me in 98SE and IE 6.x, and take you directly to where you need to go, but I have discovered in XP and IE 8, if you have a Google toolbar installed sometimes all you see is a small "Popup was blocked" message.

Go here:
http://www.Intel.com

In the search box upper right, type or copy and paste this:

Processor Identification Utility

click on Search to the right of the box.

The Intel® Processor Identification Utility is the first one on the list - click on it

Download it, install it, run it.

It should find a Sxxxx model number.

Make a note of that.

(I'm assumimg it will - I have zero Intel cpus on my working computers at the present time. If it didn't find that, make a note of the Processor number and/or Product order code.)
......

For the second Intel link in response 57,
the (Intel) Processor Spec Finder

Go here:
http://www.Intel.com

In the search box upper right, type or copy and paste this:

Processor Spec Finder

click on Search to the right of the box.

The (Intel) Processor Spec Finder
is the first one on the list - click on it

In the second white box....
enter the Sxxxx model the Processor Identification Utility found, or if it didn't find that, enter a Processor number or better still the Product order code, click on Go to the right of that.
Double click on the Sxxxx on the resulting line to see the specific specs.

I appears the Thermal Specification temp specified should be the max setting for the Shutdown temp in your bios, and the Warning temp in your bios should be about 10 C below that.


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#65
February 9, 2010 at 09:17:49
Thanks for the information. The thermal specification is 67.7 C.
So do I have to set the shutdown temperature to 67.7 C or
warning temperature to 67.7 C.

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#66
February 9, 2010 at 10:30:07
For the third time -
I appears the Thermal Specification temp specified should be the max setting for the Shutdown temp in your bios, and the Warning temp in your bios should be about 10 C below that.


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#67
February 10, 2010 at 11:03:23
Ok, thanks. Just 2 last thing.
For the speed fan what does this mean-
Temp 1: 32 C
Temp 2: 29 C
Temp 3: -8 C
HD0: 33 C
Temp 1: 23 C
What is temp 1, 2, 3 and HD0?

Also, how do I close this question.


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#68
February 10, 2010 at 13:00:43
SpeedFan makes assumptions based on what particular monitoring chip, or built into the main chipset monitoring circuits, it recognizes - it goes by what the maker of the chip or chipset orginally specified for the uses of the inputs. They used to label what each reading was for, but that turned out to be wrong for some mboards, because mboard manufacturers do not always connect the sensors to the correct inputs specified by the maker of the chip or main chipset. Rather than SpeedFan listing the temps, or fan speeds, or voltages, according to the purposes and labelling specified by the maker of the chip or main chipset, they eventually chose to number them rather than label them.
You need to examine the current temps in the bios Setup to determine which reading is for what, but it appears for your sample, the first Temp 1 is probably the CPU temp, Temp 2 is probably another temp on the mboard somewhere, e.g. close to but not under the cpu, there is no sensor connected to the Temp 3 input (same applies when the temp never changes when the system is running, whatever the reading), and the second Temp 1 is probably the system temp inside the case, well away from where the cpu is.
It also is possible some cpus have a temp sensor built into the cpu that can be read - that temp may or may not be in the current temp readings in the bios Setup - in that case that would be one of the first Temp 1 or Temp 2 readings in SpeedFan.

HD0 - newer hard drives have a temperature sensor on the hard drive's board that can be read - HD0 = (0 is zero) the first hard drive as detected by the bios the way the hard drive is connected to the hard drive controller / data header on the mboard. That temp may or may not be in the current temp readings in the bios Setup - usually it isn't there.
Other hard drivesmay be listed if they have atemp sensor that can be reade - e.g. HD1, HD2, etc. , in the numerical order the hard drives are detected by the bios the way they are connected to the hard drive controller / data headers on the mboard.

By the way, if the temp for the same thing is different in the bios than it is in SpeedFan after the system has stabilized it's temps, the mboard bios code has usually been tweaked to make the temperatures read accuratly for the particular mboard - you can probably adjust the temp settings in SpeedFan to make it read the same or close to it, somewhere in the Speed Fan settings.
...........

"how do I close this question. "

Say Thankyou you guys or similar, and/or this topic is closed or similar, and don't make any more posts in this topic


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#69
February 11, 2010 at 10:01:40
Ok thank you everyone.

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