Compaq Presario 12xl125 disassembly

Nvidia / Awrdacpi
June 27, 2010 at 15:32:52
Specs: Windows 98 SE, AMD-K6II+ MMX 533MHz/ 64MB
I need to replace the RTS battery on this laptop. I have the directions, which are in the manual that I got from Compaq's website. To remove the palm rest, it says to remove the three front screws on the bottom and the one screw on the side where the battery compartment is. I did that and the result is that the palm rest is still being held in the middle, but the sides are loose. I do not see any more screws that can be removed, nor does the directions mention any other one or device that would be holding the palm rest.

See More: Compaq Presario 12xl125 disassembly

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#1
June 27, 2010 at 18:39:22

Which manual? The User's manual or the Maintenance manual ? - if the former, get the latter.
There may be some projection underneath it that slides into a slot or similar - try pushing it each direction to see if it will move


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#2
June 28, 2010 at 10:25:28
The manual that I speak of is the the maintenance manual. None of the other options tell you anything about disassembling the computer.

According to the manual, it says to remove the four screws and then raise the monitor and lift the palm rest from the front. When I try to move the piece, in any direction, the sides move but not the middle.


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#3
June 28, 2010 at 11:21:24
They didn't say it would me easy...;). Here's a picture of the base. I see three tabs that would probably let the palmrest snap in place. Click on the picture for a large view.

http://www.notebookparts.com/produc...

You may need to slip a thin knife blade in area of the tabs to pop the palmrest off.

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#4
June 28, 2010 at 11:28:04
I took apart an Acer laptop recently. When I had removed all the screws that fasten the top and bottom of the case together, I had to insert something thin all around the edge to un-fasten the plastic "hooks" that latched the two halves together.

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#5
June 28, 2010 at 14:29:49
That did the trick to get the palm rest off. I have removed it, the keyboard and the heat spreader. According to the picture in the manual, the RTC battery is the size of a normal CMOS battery. Unfortunately, there is only a very small, almost minuscule looking metal thing that even comes close to looking like it is the same and I do not know how to move it.

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#6
June 28, 2010 at 14:39:43
Read this and look under the modem...you'll have to dig a little deeper by removing the keyboard, heat spreader, and modem.

http://forums11.itrc.hp.com/service...

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#7
June 29, 2010 at 01:29:41
You were quite correct in that the RTC battery was under the modem. Out it came, quickly replaced and back to business. Thank you for your assistance, one and all.

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#8
June 29, 2010 at 01:37:37
Not quite sure where to post my next problem. This computer does not have an Ethernet RJ-45 connection, only a RJ-11 connection. I need to do the updates but I have Cable internet. One option is to plug into my phone line, but I do not want to tie up the line while I do the updates.

Is there any way to get the computer to except the broadband connection such as a: PCMCIA Ethernet adapter; Ethernet to USB cable from router to USB port; etc?


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#9
June 29, 2010 at 11:55:09
"One option is to plug into my phone line, but I do not want to tie up the line while I do the updates."

You must also have the option from your ISP of their services via a dial-up modem connection. When you connect via a DSL or ADSL ISP (a telephone line) , you usually have that option, but I've never heard of that being an option for a cable high speed ISP (Internet Service Provider).

"PCMCIA Ethernet adapter"

Apparently your model's PCMCIA slot supports Cardbus (32 bit cards).

Product Specifications - DOES mention Cardbus
http://h10025.www1.hp.com/ewfrf/wc/...

Expansion Slots

One (1) Type II PC Card slot with support for 32-bit CardBus

You can use any Type II PCMCIA network adapter (a.k.a. PC CARD) that supports Cardbus (which is the vast majority if not all of the new ones), wired or wireless, or you can use any 16bit PCMCIA network card (Cardbus is NOT specified) , which you are much more likely to find used rather than new, and there may be no new wireless ones (certainly not wireless N ones in any case), only wired ones.

However, which operating system are you using on this laptop?
There may only be support for using the adapter in 2000 and up, unless you use an older model, which you may only find used.

If you have a router between your computer and the internet connection (the standalone high speed cable modem, or the combo router / high speed modem), you can connect to that by using a network cable in any case (a wired connection) if the PCMCIA adapter is a wired one (has a RJ45 jack), or if the router is also wireless, with a wireless PCMCIA adapter.

NOTE that a wired 10/100mbps or wired 10/100/1000mbps (gigabit) adapter connection yields you the capability of a faster internet max speed than a wireless G or wireless B adapter, if the router also supports that. Wireless N adapters have a similar capability compared to a wired 10/100/1000mbps (gigabit) adapter, in 1000mbps mode, regarding that, if your router supports that.
The max speed on the internet capability depends on what the ISP's package you are paying for supports.
.......

"Ethernet to USB cable from router to USB port;"

According to the above specs, you have only one built in USB port. It's probably NOT a good idea to use that for this purpose. Many people that have laptops use a USB hub, but USB ports in a hub connected to a built in USB port DO NOT work for many things.

You can get a USB data transfer cable - it has circuits between the two ends that allows you to transfer data between two computers using USB ports. You could transfer program installation downloads etc. from another computer you downloaded that to, however, that won't help if what you want to do is get Windows updates.

As far as I know, there is no such thing as a cable that has a USB connector on one end and a RJ45 connector on the other, even one with circuitry in between, that will allow you to connect to a router and the internet.

There are USB network adapters, wired and wireless, but you have only one built in USB port, not a good idea to tie that up, and it supports only USB 1.0 or 1.1, not USB 2.0 - that would be a bottleneck to your max speed on the internet, if the ISP's plan you pay for supports higher max speeds - you don't have that limitation with a PCMCIA (a.k.a. PC CARD) adapter .


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#10
June 29, 2010 at 16:49:59
Now that is some information. Thank you very much. OK, my intended use of the USB port was short term as the owner of the computer uses dialup when she goes online. As I suspected and if I got what you said correct, the PCMCIA Ethernet Adapter is the best route to take for my purposes of using the faster internet connection. The OS is WIndows 98SE so I will probably have to locate a Type I model.

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#11
June 29, 2010 at 17:02:50
A Type II model is necessary as you have a Type II slot. The important thing is to insure it comes with drivers for 98Se.

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#12
June 29, 2010 at 18:03:03
I use 98SE nearly every day on a K6-III 450 computer, more so than I use XP or Vista on my other computers.

If you get
- a 10/100mbps wired adapter,
- a major brand name such as D-Link
- an older model adapter
they're more likely to come with 98SE drivers.

Do you know anyone you can borrow one from?

The ad may or may not mention support for 98SE these days.
Look at the specs of the adapter in the support for the model on the manufacturer's web site if you don't see that.


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#13
June 29, 2010 at 18:39:31
OK, I understand completely now. Type II with support for Windows 98SE for the PCMCIA card. Another option is the 10/100mbps wired adapter also with support for Windows 98SE.

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#14
June 29, 2010 at 18:45:09
Correct; wired or wireless is your choice. Type II and 98Se drivers is the choice of the laptop. Either 32bit cardbus or 16bit pcmcia cards would work.

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#15
June 29, 2010 at 19:57:16
Wireless N adapters are backward compatible but are not likely to have drivers for anything previous to 2000.
The connection of wired adapters are a lot more reliable than wireless B or G adapters. Wireless N is better, if both ends of the connection are wireless N.

"Either 32bit cardbus or 16bit pcmcia cards would work."

16 bit network pcmcia (pc cards) are a lot harder to find new


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#16
July 11, 2010 at 23:40:46
Thanks to all who assisted on this computer repair. It has been successfully repaired and returned to the owner who is overjoyed to have her toy back.

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#17
July 12, 2010 at 06:02:13
We're glad to hear you found a solution.
Did you get a wireless G PCMCIA card ?

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#18
July 12, 2010 at 09:08:11
Yes and it works flawlessly.

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