coax and RJ-45 protection?

Self build / N/A
August 10, 2009 at 14:06:35
Specs: Vista SP1, 3.0Ghz,2Ghz
I recently purchased a surge supressor with phone line (DSL) protection. It does not have coax or RJ-45 protection. I have an ATI all in wonder card with an HD tuner. I attach a passive antenna to it to get TV signals. This type connection does not need coax protection, am I right? The antenna does not get any AC power; even if it did, it shoud not require coax protection since if plugged into the surge suppressor any signals being sent through the coax would be protected also. Am I thinking correctly along these lines? Also, if your DSL line is going through the phone line protection part of the surge suppressor, you shouldn't have to protect the RJ-45 line either. Am I correct? What I'm saying in a nutshell is this: If the device(s) are AC surge protected you shouldn't have to also protect any cables coming out of the device(s) into the computer. The only thing I'm not sure of is if FIOS is involved. If an RJ-45 is coming off a FIOS modem, then I think it would need to be surge protected. Thoughts, ideas?

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#1
August 10, 2009 at 15:10:30
If the antenna is out doors you are vulnerable to lightning.

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#2
August 10, 2009 at 18:50:21
The antenna is indoors. And the powered antenna I was referring to would also be indoors.

Do you know what's involved with a FIOS setup? I mean FIOS Internet. I know it's fiber coming in but coming out of the modem...is it RJ-45?


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#3
August 10, 2009 at 21:43:03
Googling for RJ45 surge protection yields many hits. Here is one example.

http://www.apc.com/products/resourc...


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Related Solutions

#4
August 12, 2009 at 12:38:47
Thanks! I looked at the link. My question is this: DSL has two parts: RJ11 going in; RJ45 going out. If RJ11 is protected, I would think there's no need to protect RJ45 segment also. That would seem redundant to me.

But if you have FIOS modem that's another story. I don't think you can surge protect fiber going to the modem, but I think you can surge protect RJ-45 coming out of the modem, assuming FIOS works that way.

I have DSL. So I should be OK protecting the RJ11 segment only or am I missing something? The signal is going through the RJ11 into the suppressor, then into the DSL modem, then out the RJ45. In this case, what do I need to protect the RJ45 also for? The incoming signal's already protected!


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#5
August 12, 2009 at 13:06:51
You only need one connecter with a surge protector for the dsl. If the phone line is pluged in to the surge protecter then you don't need to worry about the cat 5 cable since it's already protected. just plug the power to the modem in to the protecter and you'll be fine.

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#6
August 12, 2009 at 18:54:15
Thanks everyone! I appreciate all your responses!

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#7
August 12, 2009 at 19:12:37
"I looked at the link. My question is this: DSL has two parts: RJ11 going in; RJ45 going out. If RJ11 is protected, I would think there's no need to protect RJ45 segment also. That would seem redundant to me."

Absolutely right. I used to work for COX cable and those darn surge protected coaxs caused me no end of headakes. There is a grounding block (or should be according to code) in you demarcation box or being it is DSL the NID. This will protect you against lightning strikes and EMPs.

Wow you are really using RG11 to the modem? We use to use that stuff for long spans like 200 meters. As for the RG45, through it away, it is junk. Get some RG6 wire to run to your set. It is less susceptible to ingress and can carry a signal longer distances without attenuation loss.


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#8
August 13, 2009 at 19:32:07
Ace Omega,
Thanks for your response. Yes I'm using RJ11 all the way to where the phone line enters the house. It is working fine for me. I'm pleased with the speed. I'm using RJ45 only from the modem to the PC. In my case, I didn't need a "data grade" cable to replace the regular phone line. Possibly others don't need it either. I am rather close to a central office, though...about 5 miles.

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