Solved cmos not holding memory even after new battery is installed

September 28, 2012 at 08:09:52
Specs: Windows 7, Intel quad 2.66/2.67 8G RAM
I have a Win 7 Gateway LX6820 desktop computer. I'm getting a checksum error when I boot. I replaced the battery on the motherboard after first unplugging the computer. I then rebooted and corrected the date and time, loaded and saved the factory CMOS defaults, and the computer starts fine. However, if I turn it off and switch off the power strip, the CMOS memory is lost and I must repeat the process. I've checked the battery. Any ideas? Thanks.

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✔ Best Answer
September 29, 2012 at 07:01:13
The negative contact in the battery socket may not be making contact. bend it to correct.

You could also check with Gateway to see if there is a BIOS update to address this problem.

Unless the computer has been subjected to a power surge I can't understand why this should be occurring.

Below is a link to Gateway downloads. It appears there may be some BIOS updates. The latest one gives no reason for the update. Be aware that flashing the BIOS MAY result in a non operational computer.

http://support.gateway.com/us/en/pr...



#1
September 28, 2012 at 08:44:46
Did you check that the new CMOS battery is the same way up as the old one was? (usually the '+' side of the battery should be face up).

If it's inserted the wrong way up it won't do any harm, but neither will it be able to do it's job.


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#2
September 28, 2012 at 10:45:08
Oh, yes. It's in correctly. (I'm a retired sound and communications service tech. I'd better know by now which side of a battery is which!) I know maybe the next step is to meter the PC board and make sure the battery holder is making a good connection and not broken. It's a pain to get to, and it's doubtful that's the problem, but it could be. It could also be a cold solder joint. I was hoping to avoid this.

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#3
September 28, 2012 at 11:51:29
Could be the RTC (real time clock) is bad.

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#4
September 28, 2012 at 17:41:30
Silly question but did you save the changes when exiting?

Also, sometimes the contacts can get bent when removing the battery.


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#5
September 28, 2012 at 18:26:52
Yes, I did save the changes, thanks. I did also notice how easily it is to bend the contacts. I think they are not bent, but will double check then Saturday. The battery fits tightly so I'm hoping it's OK. I admit I don't know how to check to see if the real time clock is bad, however it keeps time when on. Also, the memory stays in place if I keep the computer plugged in and don't connect it to a power strip. It seems it uses a little power to keep the cmos memory in place, even if there are problems with the battery circuit. I guess I'm going to need to bite the bullet and pull the PC apart to make sure the battery connections and the pc board traces are good.

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#6
September 28, 2012 at 18:47:21
Did the computer CMOS hold the settings in the past?

Did you use the clear CMOS jumper in the past?

Possible someone sold you a dead battery too.


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#7
September 28, 2012 at 19:10:50
I checked the battery with my meter/battery tester and it's fine. It's always held the memory before. I've never moved the CMOS jumper. The computer has other problems too. It often will not start then it runs the repair utility, usually System Restore, to get it going. It used to just freeze too. I know enough about computers to have a good anti-virus and firewall in place and a repair program; I use System Mechanic Pro. I have three other computers and do minor repairs to computers my family has, so I am familiar with basic servicing. I've also replaced CMOS batteries in my other computers with no problems.This Gateway computer is only three years old. I've run a hard drive test utility many times and other tests, and all seems OK. some times I think I just have a lemon. I never had this many problems with my HP, Dell or Compaq computer. By the way, I appreciate everyone trying to help me and doing so so quickly.

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#8
September 28, 2012 at 19:42:48
Everything appears to be asked and answered already and this appears to be a weird problem. I will make a side comment though:
It is the process of turning off the computer from a power strip that makes the CMOS battery need replacing after just a few years. Every time there is no power going to the motherboard, the battery needs to support the CMOS memory but if it remains plugged in, the battery is rarely drawn upon. I have had computers for as long as 9 years without ever needing to replace the CMOS battery.
I am not saying that leaving it plugged in all of the time is significantly better (other than this) and turning it off at a power strip is apparently environmentally better, it is just my observation and my preference.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
September 28, 2012 at 22:53:19
I agree. Ironically enough, the other computers I have are plugged directly into a surge protector, and one is a laptop, so I've only replaced the battery in one, and that's my wife's old Win 98 gaming computer! The lazy solution for now is just to leave it plugged into a surge protector like I'm doing. This surge protector is also a UPS power supply so even if the power fails, I have time to shut down and the CMOS memory will probably hold. When I get real ambitious I get into the motherboard.

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#10
September 29, 2012 at 06:40:11
The battery is only a backup for when there's no power to the board. As long as there's power to the power supply, there's power to the board (& therefore the CMOS chip), even if the computer is shutdown. But as soon as you kill the power at the power strip, all power to the board is lost. The BIOS settings are being lost because the battery backup isn't working. If you're sure the battery is good & it's installed correctly, the problem is either with the battery circuit, the RTC, or the CMOS chip itself.

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#11
September 29, 2012 at 07:01:13
✔ Best Answer
The negative contact in the battery socket may not be making contact. bend it to correct.

You could also check with Gateway to see if there is a BIOS update to address this problem.

Unless the computer has been subjected to a power surge I can't understand why this should be occurring.

Below is a link to Gateway downloads. It appears there may be some BIOS updates. The latest one gives no reason for the update. Be aware that flashing the BIOS MAY result in a non operational computer.

http://support.gateway.com/us/en/pr...


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