CMOS Checksum, HD not recognized

June 29, 2010 at 16:54:35
Specs: XP Pro, AMD Athlon 64 3200+
My brother needed to format his computer and had to access his BIOS to change the boot priority but he had a password he didn't remember. He removed his BIOS battery for an hour and replaced it but now he's getting a CMOS Checksum error and his hard drive is not being detected.

His optical drives are EIDE and are being detected but the SATA hard drive is not. He tried moving the SATA cable to different ports on the motherboard and tried using multiple MOLEX power connectors.

He also tried using a new battery and loading the default BIOS settings but nothing's working. Any thoughts?

Windows XP Pro SP2
AMD Athlon 64 3200+ 2.0GHZ Venice Core
Gigabyte GA-K8N-SLI Motherboard
1GB Geil DDR400 Dual Channel
ATI Radeon X800 GTO Fireblade Edition 256MB DDR PCIE


See More: CMOS Checksum, HD not recognized

Report •


#1
June 29, 2010 at 17:27:29
Might be a good start here. http://www.pcguide.com/ts/x/sys/boo...

I support the 'Everybody Draw Mohammed Day'. A religion doesn't deny my freedom.


Report •

#2
June 29, 2010 at 17:58:10
1st of all, you don't have to remove the CMOS battery for an hour...you only have to remove it for a few seconds. Or better yet, use the ClearCMOS jumper. The trick is, the power cord MUST be unplugged. Hopefully you (or your brother) are familiar enough with the BIOS to be able to reconfigure the settings. You'll most likely take a performance hit if you simply load the defaults.

2nd, WinXP doesn't natively support SATA drives & won't recognize the HDD unless you do one of 3 things:

1. enter the BIOS & change the SATA controller setting from ACHI to IDE mode. Then once XP is installed, you can install the SATA drivers, then go back into the BIOS & re-enable ACHI
2. if that's not an option, you'll need to load the SATA drivers from a floppy disk at the beginning of the XP installation by pressing F6 then following the instructions
3. if you don't have a floppy drive, you'll have to create a new XP disk with the SATA drivers already slipstreamed into it. To do it, you'll need a program called nLite.

http://maxeasyguide.blogspot.com/20...


Report •

#3
June 29, 2010 at 18:43:37
jefro's reference is not ideal.

The last part of jam's info is about if you wanted to install or re-install XP on a SATA hard drive by booting the computer from an XP CD.

You should make sure the bios settings are correct before you do that.
- If the bios does not detect a bootable partition after you have removed the battery or cleared the cmos, if the Boot Order or similar settings have a CD drive or similar listed before any hard drive, the bios will automatically boot from the XP CD, if it's in a drive the bios can boot from (if you have more than one optical drive, see below) , but you need to determine why the bios is not detecting a bootable partition when it was before. See below.
- if the bios DOES detect a bootable partition after you have removed the battery or cleared the cmos, if the Boot Order or similar settings have a CD drive or similar listed before any hard drive, if the bios can boot from the disk (if you have more than one optical drive, see below) , you will see a line while booting "Press any key to boot from CD" or similar - press the specified key to boot from the XP CD while that line is on the screen.

- if the Boot Order or similar settings DO NOT have a CD drive or similar listed before any hard drive, you can't boot from the XP CD until it DOES have the Boot Order or similar settings set so you have a CD drive or similar listed before any hard drive.
If that setting is not correct...
If the bios does NOT detect a bootable partition after you have removed the battery or cleared the cmos, you will get an "operating system not found" or similar error. See below.
If the bios DOES detect a bootable partition after you have removed the battery or cleared the cmos, the bios will boot the hard drive partition.
......

When you remove the mboard battery, then re-install it, or move the clear cmos jumper on the mboard and move it back, the cmos is cleared of user settings, AND the time and date are also set to defaults.
You will get the Cmos Checksum error or similar when you boot after that.
You have to enter the bios Setup and set at least the current Date and Time (or any date and time other than defaults) , Save bios settings, in order to get rid of the Cmos Checksum error or similar when you boot after that.

If you still get the Cmos Checksum error or similar when you boot after that......

- when you re-install the mboard battery, it's polarity must be correct. Usually it's in a socket that's flat to the mboard surface, and the + must be on the top where you can see it when the battery is installed. If it's in a vertical socket, you must be able to see the + when it's installed.
- the contact in the socket that touches the top of the battery must touch it - if that's bent upwards or otherwise doesn't touch it, remove the battery, bend that contact so it will touch the battery when it's installed.
.......

Since everything is set to defaults when you remove the battery or clear the cmos, that sometimes causes problems when the bootable partition on the default drive the bios is trying to boot from is not bootable = does not have an operating system on it.

If you have only the one hard drive, connect it to SATA 1 or similar, and...
Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.
............

- If you have two hard drives, one IDE, the other SATA, the default is either
- the bios attempts to boot from the IDE hard drive first,
- or from the SATA first,
depending on the bios default.
If the hard drive it attempts to boot from is NOT bootable, the bios will NOT attempt to boot from another hard drive.

- if you have two hard drives, both SATA, or both IDE, one has a partition with an operating system installed on it, the other does not, the bios by default will attempt to boot from the first hard drive it detects, according to the way the drive is connected to which data cable header on the mboard.
E.g. if the drive you boot from is connected to SATA 2, the drive that has no operating system to SATA 1, the bios will attempt to boot from the drive connected to SATA 1. If the hard drive it attempts to boot from is NOT bootable, the bios will NOT attempt to boot from another hard drive.

In both cases, if the bios does not find a bootable drive, you must go into the bios Setup and find the list of hard drives, and make the one you want to boot from the first one in the list, Save bios settings.
Usually they are listed by the model number the bios detects, but they may be listed as HDD0, HDD1, etc., or similar. .
Usually that list is near the Boot Order or similar settings. Sometimes you can list more than one hard drive in the Boot Order or similar settings.
.....

In order to be able boot from a bootable optical disk, a CD drive or similar must be listed before any hard drive in the Boot Order or similar settings in the bios. Some bioses have the settings that way by default, others do not. It does not necessary have to be first in the list. E.g. if you have a floppy drive connected, that should be listed first.
However, network boot or similar should be listed AFTER all hard drives, in most cases, unless you need to boot from a company or institutional network.

If you have more than one optical (CD or DVD) drive, many bioses will only attempt to boot from a bootable disk in ONE of them. In that case, insert the disk in another drive, try again, or go into the bios and find the list of optical drives - the drive you want to boot a bootable disk from must be made the first one in the list, Save bios settings.
.......


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
June 29, 2010 at 20:38:57
Sorry, I misunderstood the question...I thought the HDD wasn't being recognized during the XP reinstall.

Report •

#5
June 30, 2010 at 14:32:40
please try to the motherboard bois update
thaks
ghazanfarali_1@hotmail.com

Report •

#6
July 1, 2010 at 20:22:20
M Ghazanfar Ali

Bioses do NOT get corrupted spontaneously.
Flashing the bios is NOT a fix all.
There no valid reason to do that in this case.
.....

It is NOT a good idea to have your email address in any post on the web. We who answer frequently here would not abuse using it, but the bad guys or malware certainly could.

You can Edit your own posts on this site, except possibly if you made the first post in a Topic and there is already at least one Response, by clicking on the notepad icon at the left of the icons at the top of the body of your posts.


Report •


Ask Question