Cloned HDD will not boot on new computer

July 20, 2011 at 09:51:42
Specs: Windows XP
I cloned my hard drive cause it has a very important program on there i don't want to lose. It works fine when i swap it out with the old hard drive. Like it was the original. Well I decided to use that cloned hard drive and put it on a new system. New motherboard, new ram, new processor, all that good stuff. Well now it won't boot. I see that windows is loading then a quick flash of a blue screen. I have stopped the auto restart to see the error codes:
Stop: 0X0000007B, 0XBA4CB524, 0XC0000034, 0X00000000

I have tried doing a FIXMRB, when I try to do FIXBOOT, the system says it can not find FIXBOOT. Like i said though it works perfect on the original computer.


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#1
July 20, 2011 at 10:04:22
If you have changed motherboard etc it won't work, The clone will only work with the original hardware.

A thank you would be nice, if I have helped.


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#2
July 20, 2011 at 10:27:33
XP is configured to the old hardware. Now that you've changed the motherboard, you're done. That's just how it works. Windows will have to be reinstalled. You may be able to do a "repair installation" though.

http://www.dougknox.com/xp/tips/xp_...


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#3
July 20, 2011 at 10:28:51
I appreciate it. Is it the same way if you were to grade the origninal with the new motherboard and then clone that? Or is it the same thing?

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#4
July 20, 2011 at 12:16:45
The motherboard is the problem. You can upgrade the hard disk & RAM. But the motherboard will have different drivers.

A thank you would be nice, if I have helped.


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#5
July 20, 2011 at 13:59:35
When you have a hard drive that had Windows XP (or 2000) installed on it when the hard drive was connected to a motherboard, then connect that hard drive to a different mboard and attempt to boot from that same Windows installation, if the hardware (primarily the chips that are built into the mboard) of the second mboard is more than a little different from the original mboard, you see the first bit of Windows graphics when Windows attempts to load, then one of several possible things will happen and Windows will NOT load all the way.

A Repair installation of Windows will probably fix your problem WITHOUT you losing the personal data you have added to the partition Windows was installed on after Setup was finished the last time Setup was run, .
A Repair installation of XP is often called a Repair Install but that's NOT correct - what it does is it runs Setup.

In order to run a Repair installation of XP....

- you MUST have a Windows CD of the same version as the Windows installation - Home or Pro, and boot the computer from it.
(If it's NOT the same, you WILL NOT have the second Repair choice when you run Setup.)

You must supply a Product Key when you do the Repair installation procedure.
- the CD MUST be for the same type of Microsoft license as the Product Key you used for the existing Windows installation - OEM, Retail, or Volume - otherwise the Product Key will not be accepted by Setup, and you won't be able to complete Setup.

E.g. for a brand name system Windows installation it must be an OEM CD in order for you to be able to use the (OEM) Product Key that's on the official Microsoft label on the outside of the computer case, that is either
- an XP Re-installation CD that came with the same brand name model, or that is part of a Recovery disk set for the same brand name model
- or - a regular Microsoft OEM CD - it has the Microsoft holograms on it, and "For distribution with a new PC only." printed on it.

(If there is no official Microsoft label on the outside of the computer case (on the original case in your situation), or if there is one but you can no longer read the Product Key on it because it is worn, if you connect the hard drive to the original mboard in a working system, you can find out which Product Key the Windows installation was using by using a third party program,. E.g. Search for : keyfinder on the Web, made by Jelly Bean,,,,, .
Brand name computers often have two Product Keys for the original software installation - one on the label, a different one on the Windows installation - either one will work fine.)

An XP CD specifically for a brand name computer will probably refuse to run the Repair installation procedure or install Windows from scratch on anything except the same model.
.....
- you must NOT be having any problems with ram errors or with the optical drive being able to read the CD properly .

- Setup sometimes has problems completing if it encounters (a) problem(s) detecting hardware during the second stage of Setup - in that case you can't complete Setup until you have removed the device that is causing the problem - that may happen during a Repair installation yet may not happen when you install Windows from scratch.
To avoid that possibility, unplug all cards other than a video card installed in slots on the mboard, and unplug everything plugged into ports on the case other than a mouse and keyboard, that is not essential for running Setup, BEFORE you run Setup

If you are not able to complete Setup for those or any other reasons, you will probably NOT have the second Repair choice when you figure out what the problem is and fix that and run Setup again,

There are lots of "hits" on the web about it.

E.g.
How to Perform a Windows XP Repair Install (Repair Installation !)
http://www.michaelstevenstech.com/X...
..........

Large capacity hard drives.

The Windows CD you use MUST have SP1 or later updates integrated into it in order for Setup to be able to recognize drives (or partitions on drives) larger than 137gb drive manufacturer's size (= 128gb binary size in the bios and in the operating system) as their full size.

XP CDs that have SP2 or SP3 updates integrated into them have that printed on the CD.
All regular Microsoft XP CDs that I've seen DO NOT have SP1 printed on them if they have SP1 updates, but the volume labels for the CD for XP CDs with no SP updates included are different from the volume labels for CDs that DO have SP1 updates included - you can search on the web using the volume label to determine whether it has SP1 updates or no SP updates.

If your XP CD has no SP updates included at all, you can make yourself a "slipstreamed" CD, preferably a CD-R for the best drive compatibility, that has had the SP3 updates integrated into it, by using instructions found on the web, and use that "slipstreamed" CD rather than the original XP CD, along with the original Product Key.


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#6
July 20, 2011 at 14:44:26
Hardware abstraction layer is what is commonly known as HAL. It is the parts that make up a motherboard. MS installs to a single HAL.

1/3 of highway deaths are caused by drunks. The rest are by people who can't drive any better than a drunk.


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#7
July 20, 2011 at 16:10:16
Well I appreciate all the help guys. Thanks.

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#8
July 20, 2011 at 18:08:12
You did see the posts on how to fix that above, didn't you?

1/3 of highway deaths are caused by drunks. The rest are by people who can't drive any better than a drunk.


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