Clone or Backup Hard Drive

Toshiba / Satellite l305d
April 2, 2013 at 12:31:39
Specs: Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit, 2.7GHz / 6000MB
A hard drive from a friend's Emachine has crashed. I have hooked it up to one of my computers, and can access the drive. I would like to create a back-up or clone the the first drive in an attempt to be able to migrate to a new hard drive that is bootable in the original Emachine! Any and all help is greatly appreciated.

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#1
April 2, 2013 at 12:35:02
Clone using easus, paragon or macrium, they all have free versions.

A thank you would be nice, if I have helped.


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#2
April 2, 2013 at 12:46:05
clive_pearce..Thank you for your quick reply. I shall follow-up on your suggestion, and inform you of the results! Again, thank you!

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#3
April 2, 2013 at 14:50:17
Your post doesn't make sense. If the hard drive crashed then you wouldn't be able to access it.

More likely condition is that Windows is messed up and that stops the computer from booting.

If your friend never created a factory restore set of disks he still may be able to. You may also be able to perform a factory restore by accessing the files on the hidden hard drive partition that e machines uses.

I suggest you download a hard drive fitness tool from Seagate called Seatools for DOS. Install to a CDR or if allowed, a flash drive. Boot to it on the e machines and determine the condition of the hard drive.


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Related Solutions

#4
April 2, 2013 at 18:44:31
Image it to an external drive. Images are compressed and portable, so they are more manageable (you can move the image files around, extract contained files from them, restore the image to multiple drives, update them differentially, etc.)

I've had good experience with Terabyte Unlimited's imaging software, but any of the imaging software (Ghost, Acronis, etc.) available should work.

Your post doesn't make sense. If the hard drive crashed then you wouldn't be able to access it.
I think he's just naive about his terminology. Yes, it's likely that some critical operating system files become corrupted.

So, the recommended course of action here is to image the drive and run a repair installation using the operating system disc or included recovery system on the hard drive.


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#5
April 2, 2013 at 19:02:16
If there is a problem with his system files, using an image to put the same problem onto a new drive is not going to get him any further than he is now, it will still be corrupted.
Make a back up of the important files as a protection and do a repair of Windows, after verifying that the drive is completely good with Seatools (as mentioned above). Use the longest test in Seatools. Once you verify the drive is good, test the original computer's memory with Memtest via a bootable CD you can make. Once you verify that the hard drive and the memory are good, then do the repair of Windows.
If the drive has many issues, it will need replacing and an image of a drive with that many problems will not be a good image to use. In this case, reinstall from a recovery disk set that he should have made when the machine was new, of one you purchase from the system manufacturer. Then restore from the back up the personal stuff.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
April 2, 2013 at 23:55:20
If you do want to clone the drive (assuming it's 'clonable') the best bet is to download the necessary software from the drive manufacturer. It's free and specifically designed for that drive.

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#7
April 4, 2013 at 04:59:13
It might be possible to run system file checker

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929833

Or even create a windows 7 recovery disk

http://windows.microsoft.com/is-is/...

A thank you would be nice, if I have helped.


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