Solved Clone large HDD onto smaller SSD - Partition too big

April 21, 2013 at 09:31:02
Specs: Windows 7, A8-5600K / 16GB RAM
I have a problem. I have a 320GB Seagate HDD, with a 284GB Main Partition, of which only 68GB is used (216GB of 284GB Free)

I have a new OCZ Vertex 4 128GB SSD. I want to Clone the existing Laptop HDD onto the OCZ SSD.

The problem is, the Partition ITSELF is 284GB, Much larger than the OCZ SSD. Is there a way for me to Image the existing HDD on to the SSD?? So all my programs remain intact??


See More: Clone large HDD onto smaller SSD - Partition too big

Report •


#1
April 21, 2013 at 10:08:50
✔ Best Answer
You need to "shrink" the existing 284GB partition using a bootable CD containing partition-management software, since you obviously cannot shrink it while Windows is running. Try the free Minitool Partition Wizard:

http://www.partitionwizard.com/free...

To shrink a partition with the above software, read this tutorial:
http://www.partitionwizard.com/resi...


Report •

#2
April 21, 2013 at 10:10:42
I moved my Win7 installation from an HDD to a smaller SSD manually. After installing the SSD by using the Win 7 install DVD, and booting into the recovery environment. From there, I:
• Partitioned and formatted the SSD. Diskpart and format were used, respectively.
• Copied the files over from the old HDD to the new SSD. I think I used xcopy with /e /x /b /v /h /k. I think I had to run it twice, because it kept trying to copy the symlinks before the directories they linked to. Obviously, the first pass generated a lot of errors that I helpfully ignored until I ran it again.
• Ran bootrec with /FixBoot, then /FixMbr, then /RebuildBcd, because booting is nice.

Then I powered down, disconnected the old HDD, and booted up. I remember Win7 deciding since the SSD wasn't my HDD, it should get a volume label that wasn't C:, and that annoyed me. I had to go registry diving to fix it. This TechNet article had the information I needed in order to do that. After making the changes and rebooting, I made sure everything I cared about was still working. Then I found one of those "set up your PC for your SSD" articles and followed those instructions. This basically consisted of making sure TRIM was on, and prefetch was turned off.

All this was helped by my laptop having two HDD bays, but I don't see why an external enclosure wouldn't work. So long as the enclosure is seen by the WinPE environment, everything should work the same for you. Just remember, if you screw something up, you can still fall back to the old HDD. Just don't wipe it or throw it away until you're sure everything's okay.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

#3
April 21, 2013 at 12:39:45
Phil,

I did as you explained.. Shrunk the System Partition down to 72GB with Partition Wizard, then I used EaseUS Todo Backup to Clone the HDD to the SSD. It went just fine... HOWEVER, When I insert the SSD into the Laptop to attempt to boot, It simply boots to a black screen with a flashing cursor. I can't even get a command prompt. What should I be doing firrently? What other steps need to be taken?


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
April 21, 2013 at 13:42:52
You probably need to rebuild your MBR, and other boot bits.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

#5
April 21, 2013 at 14:00:15
I redid it, Cloning the whole Disc instead of the Partition this time. It boots to an error screen saying that it failed to start. It asks me to insert the Windows Disc to Repair the Installation, but the discs I have from HP is a set of Windows 7 Recovery discs. Which simply try and do a full recovery. I do NOT want to recover though. That was the whole point of the Clone. I was hoping to do the clone, run startup repair to repair the boot, and be done.. Any Suggestions?? Ho can I rebuild from here.

Report •

#6
April 21, 2013 at 14:19:31
http://windows.microsoft.com/is-is/...
You'll need a working Win7 with a CD or DVD burner. If you don't have one, you can always plug your old disk back in. From there, you can use bootrec from the command line to rebuild your boot DB.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

#7
April 21, 2013 at 15:42:42
You make a Windows 7 Repair Disk from any Windows 7 machine as long as both are either 64bit or both 32bit and use that. Boot to the repair disk and perform a Start Up Repair. That will fix your MBR on the SSD. Make sure that the original hard drive is unplugged during this operation so that it does not tend to put the MBR on the wrong drive.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#8
April 21, 2013 at 16:42:19
Well, I did all the above. Burned a Win 7 x64 ISO and tried to do a repair. The results are that Windows cannot repair this machine automatically.

The Startup Repair Dialog states:

Root cause found:
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Unspecified changes to system configuration might have caused the problem.

Repair action: System files integrity check repair
Result:Failed. Error code = 0x57
Time taken = 3276 ms
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Report •

#9
April 21, 2013 at 16:58:49
Isn't there a command line option somewhere in that menu? You're doing some advanced configuration changes here, you're not going to find a GUI to fix what needs fixing. Run bootrec with the options listed above, then edit the registry on your soon-to-be-C: drive. Regedit should still work. Backup and delete the MountedDevices key in your off-line system registry. That should remove any barrier to boot, unless you're missing some boot driver for the SSD. I don't think that's the case because you hooked up the drive to your laptop to clone it, right?

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

#10
April 21, 2013 at 17:11:06
Razor, As I did not know how to do it off my Laptop, I hooked up my Thermaltake BlackX Sata Dock to me Desktop, Inserted the HDD into it, then I mounted the SSD inside my Desktop to perform the clone. Then specified the drives in EaseUS to perform the Clone.

I went to the command prompt, performed all the bootrec commands.

When I select the Command Prompt option, when I run Regedit, what keys should I be editing?


Report •

#11
April 21, 2013 at 17:56:30
(Select) HKEY_USERS -> (menu) File -> Load Hive -> (select) <SSD's drive letter>:\Windows\system32\config\system -> OK -> (type) system -> OK

You should now have a HKEY_USERS\system\MountedDevices key. Backup (aka export) and delete this key. Once you do that, select HKEY_USERS\system and go to File -> Unload Hive

This should hopefully cause the SSD to become C: when you boot off of it. If that doesn't work, you'll need to boot off of the old HDD and connect your SSD (probably through some enclosure) so Windows installs the needed drivers. Then re-clone the drive. Then redo the bootrec and regedit settings. If it doesn't work after that, I don't know what the issue could be.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

#12
April 21, 2013 at 19:27:40
The standard way to clone one drive to another drive--same size or different size--is to use the software from the drive manufacturer for that purpose. I assume it's that way for SSD drives. Have you checked the support site for the SSD drive to see if such software is available?

Report •

#13
April 21, 2013 at 19:30:16
It's an OCZ drive. Their site recommends using Acronis True Image.

Report •

#14
April 21, 2013 at 19:55:28
I'm not familiar with that brand but WD and Seagate have their own versons of Acronis available for download to clone their drives. Does OCZ?

Another thing--their versions of acronis only require that one drive be theirs. So if OCZ doesn't have their own version and since the other drive is a Seagate then Seagate's acronis might work with a seagate-to-OCZ cloning.

Edit It looks like you can download acronis from the OCZ site:

http://ocz.com/consumer/download/ac...


Report •

#15
April 22, 2013 at 12:16:14
Ok, About to throw the whole system out the window. I did ALL of the above, no joy, errors galore. So I started FRESH. COMPLETELY Reinstalled Windows, several needed Apps, and now I have a NEW HDD =

CLEAN HDD = 247GB of 284GB Free. (37GB Used)

CLEAN SSD = 128GB

As instructed, I used the RECOMMENDED Acronis True Image Software off of the OCZ Site, all the way to Selecting the Source Disc. Then, When I get to the Select Destination Disc, the OCZ is greyed out because the Main Partition on the HDD is bigger than the whole SSD. What do I do now??

Last time I ran Partition Wizard to Compress it, but that rendered the Windows Partition Unbootable on the HDD & SSD. GRRRRRRRRRRR....


Report •

#16
April 22, 2013 at 12:40:44
Wait, after all of that, and you didn't test the HDD after shrinking the partition but before the cloning?

Well, feel free to shrink the larger partition, but make sure the HDD works after the partition modifications before trying to clone it.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


Report •

#17
April 22, 2013 at 14:05:25
I know that it might be a pain right now, but a new clean install is in the long run, a better option when going from an older HD to a new SSD drive. Also look to OCZ's site for instructions (or Google) on what BIOS and Windows settings are best for an SSD drive for best performance and life.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

#18
April 22, 2013 at 14:44:20
Razor, you as always, are a genius for pointing out the obvious. I shrunk the partition, restarted 5 times to verify bootability after, and all is well. Cloned, and I now have two identical drives. Thank you to ALL.

Report •


Ask Question