Solved clone HDD with damaged sectors?

Self-built, one of many / Asus m4a77d
September 18, 2017 at 09:23:52
Specs: Windows 7 64-bit, Core i5 / 6GB
I'm working on a 5 year old Dell Inspiron N7110 for a friend - Intel Core i5 2430M (2.40 GHz),
6GB RAM, 640GB Toshiba HDD, Win7. It runs painfully slow. It was heavily infected with malware but even after cleaning it, it's still extremely slow. It literally takes 5-10 seconds to respond after a mouse click. I ran CrystalDiskInfo & HD Tune; both came up with a warning about damaged sectors. HD Tune lists the number of retired sectors as 456.

I'm planning to replace the Toshiba 640GB 5400 rpm with a WDC Black 750GB 7200 rpm & cloning the partitions using Acronis True Image. I've cloned "good" HDDs before without any issues but might I have problems due to the condition of the source drive?

Thanks.


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✔ Best Answer
September 19, 2017 at 16:58:20
Certainly worth a shot, the worst that happens is you format and you are at the same place except you know you have to do it the slower way.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
September 18, 2017 at 09:41:10
I have not tried it myself but Acronis should ignore the retired sectors. It appears to be 'intelligent' about things like that. I cloned a SATA SSD to a PCIe SSD a little while ago with WD downloaded free version of Acronis and they were similar in size but not exactly the same and it had no trouble compensating for that.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
September 18, 2017 at 10:38:33
But, if there was important information or programs in those sectors you may still have problems.

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#3
September 19, 2017 at 08:10:30
ijack - yeah, that's my concern. I backed up all the files so I guess I'll just give Acronis a shot & see what happens. I'm trying to save the hassle of a fresh install & all that goes with it.

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#4
September 19, 2017 at 16:58:20
✔ Best Answer
Certainly worth a shot, the worst that happens is you format and you are at the same place except you know you have to do it the slower way.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
September 28, 2017 at 09:26:44
Here's an update: I finally installed the new HDD & connected the old drive via USB. I booted off the WD Acronis True Image CD, selected the source drive (old HDD), but the destination drive (new HDD) was grayed out. I tried a couple of different ways to make it work but had no luck. A google search turned up numerous threads regarding the same problem. So rather than wasting any more time, I did a clean install of Win7 & will just copy over whatever I can.

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#6
September 28, 2017 at 18:50:45
Works.
I would leave it at that except that it would be considered too short an answer to be helpful.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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