Changed graphic cards, how do I boot PC?

June 26, 2018 at 11:51:09
Specs: Windows 7, Intel Core i3-4350/3.60GHz
I recently switched graphics cards without uninstalling the old drivers. Now when I start the computer with the new graphics card installed, it either takes me to the Bios page or the startup repair function. I can't boot into safe mode and I'm not sure what settings to change in the Bios menu. I'm using a GTX 1050 and my PSU is 600 watts.

How do I get my computer to boot up so that I can uninstall the old drivers?


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#1
June 26, 2018 at 13:43:49
I've got it working now. Under the advanced settings in BIOS I changed the SATA option and then tried booting. This allowed me to boot and install the new drivers.

Not sure if I should keep the new SATA option but I think I will for now since it seems to be working.

UPDATE: PC is running very slow. Trying to figure out why.

I ran a junkware removal tool and my speed has returned.

Honestly I got this new video card to watch 4K Netflix only to find that you need Intel's 7th generation core CPU or newer and Windows 10 with Microsoft Edge to play 4K. Woe is me.

message edited by Greensky


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#2
June 26, 2018 at 16:52:09
Please post your complete system specs so we have an idea what you're working with.

If you had been using onboard graphics & then switched to a graphics card, there are several BIOS settings that should be changed. A retail board BIOS is generally much more complicated than an OEM board BIOS so there might be settings such as enable/disable, shared memory, initial display 1st, etc. The SATA setting doesn't have anything to do with graphics so unless you did something else you're not telling us, there should have been no reason to touch it. Could it be you loaded BIOS defaults?

BTW, saying you have a 600W PSU doesn't tell us a thing about its quality.

message edited by riider


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#3
June 26, 2018 at 20:24:12
Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM) i3-4350 CPU @ 3.60GHz, 3600 Mhz, 2 Core(s), 4 Logical Processor(s)

Video Card: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1050

VGA PSU with 600amps

8GB RAM (DDR3 I believe)

Sorry if I missed anything. Not sure what motherboard model I have... it's an ASUS.

I googled a forum and read someone's post with a similar problem. Someone advised him to change the SATA settings, so thought I would try it. To be fair though, I first attempted to repair under the Startup Repair screen which failed, which then asked me to backtrack to an old restore point so I did, tried to repair again and this time it actually took a while attempting to repair but ultimately gave me a "Repair Failed" screen. After all of this I changed the SATA settings and tried again to boot up and it worked. Maybe the "Failed Repair" actually solved the issue and not the settings change in BIOS.

Not sure if this matters/helps but my old graphics card was a GTX 560 which required PSU cables to be plugged into it. The new GTX 1050 does not have plugins for the cables.

message edited by Greensky


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#4
June 26, 2018 at 20:55:15
Drivers from the GTX560 should in theory work nominally with the new card but booting to Safe Mode (F8) should have let you load default Windows drivers and let you change out the driver.

You did not mention the make and model number of the power supply which often matters but since it ran the old card with its higher current demands then it should be fine.

If the system ran properly with the old card then it should have run well with the new card once the driver was replaced with the newer one. If you had other problems then they should have been dealt with first otherwise you you do not know where the problems are (new card, old driver, adware, malware, hardware compatibility, BIOS settings, week or failing power supply or other hardware, etc.).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
June 27, 2018 at 04:05:50
$1 Do you have a displayport/dvi/hmdi/vga cable plugged in between the gtx 1050 & the monitor?
$2 Or from the motherboard io to the monitor?

$1 i do have a possible solution for this but its more ellaborate

$2 If you are using the 2nd option your PC detects a dedicated GPU, thus turning off the iGPU which is pluged into the monitor, giving no ouput.
Plugging it into the gtx 1050 may fix your issue.

p.s. You're the 2nd person to ask this in the last week, the other guy just didnt answer our answers :/

i5-6600K[delid]@4.8GHz/4.4GHz@1.39v LLC=6 | 2x4GB Crucial-DDR4-2133CL15@14-14-14-30 1T 2800MHz@1.37v
MSI Armor RX 570 4GB@1395Mhz core@1.168v/1920MHz BiosModded


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#6
June 27, 2018 at 05:17:07
Well I'll try to answer your questions at least, haha. I appreciate the help!

I previously had an HDMI to VGA cable attached from my 4k monitor to my GTX560. Now I have a "high powered" HDMI connected from my monitor to the 1050. It's the cable that came with the ASUS 4k monitor.


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#7
June 27, 2018 at 05:22:59
"If the system ran properly with the old card then it should have run well with the new card once the driver was replaced with the newer one. If you had other problems then they should have been dealt with firstĀ "

Ya, as soon as I booted up the PC I loaded the disk and updated the drivers. Didn't surf the net first but started noticing all of my windows were opening super slow. Thought it was just the drivers updating in the background.

Maybe system restore caused something to come back into effect? It is running normally again at the moment.


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#8
June 27, 2018 at 07:50:28
Lucky you, only HMDI 2.0 supports 4K@ 60 fps :)

"Maybe system restore caused something to come back into effect? It is running normally again at the moment"

Let us know if it starts acting weird again, maby the required reboot reboot after the driver install fixed it.

i5-6600K[delid]@4.8GHz/4.4GHz@1.39v LLC=6 | 2x4GB Crucial-DDR4-2133CL15@14-14-14-30 1T 2800MHz@1.37v
MSI Armor RX 570 4GB@1395Mhz core@1.168v/1920MHz BiosModded


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#9
June 27, 2018 at 13:53:34
"You're the 2nd person to ask this in the last week, the other guy just didnt answer our answers :/"

I agree with hidde663, although I think he meant "the other guy just didn't answer our questions". We ask follow up questions for a reason & if you want the best help we can give, we need the answers.

"Not sure what motherboard model I have... it's an ASUS"
That doesn't help us to help you.

"my PSU is 600 watts"
"VGA PSU with 600amps"
Neither of those statements help either. The 2nd is worse than the 1st. How about opening the case & getting the make/model numbers off the PSU & motherboard? You should know exactly what hardware you have anyway.

message edited by riider


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#10
June 27, 2018 at 19:31:41
Sorry, I meant 600 watts for the power supply. Brain fart on typing out "amps"... Not much is written on my PSU. It does have a "80 Plus Bronze" label on it... not sure if that's a model or a power thing.

When I open up cmd and type in: "wmic baseboard get product,Manufacturer,version,serialnumber" it says that my motherboard Product # is B85M-G R2.0 while my serial number is 140627451102229 and Version is Rev X.0x


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#11
June 28, 2018 at 01:18:26
try updating the bios, also you could you try this (ill give it 25% chance for succes):

[1] turn the pc off&remove power cable, then hold power button for 10seconds.
[2] once the PC is completely off, remove the gtx 1050.
[3] then put the power cable back in& start the PC
[4] Then enable the iGPU in the bios.
To enable your IGPU (should be a IntelĀ® HD Graphics 4600) integrated graphics from the bios.
[5] when you are in windows change the screen resolution to something very low like 800x600 pixels.
[6]repeat step 1
[7]place the gtx 1050 back in
[8] repeat step 3
[9]disable the igpu
[10] "apply changes & reset"
[11] you should now be able to get into windows
[12] from there just change the resolution to your screen resolution, probbaly 1920x1080 px

Source: this guy from tomshardware:
http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/answe...

Source2: someone with gtx 1050 Ti problems
https://forums.geforce.com/default/...

i5-6600K[delid]@4.8GHz/4.4GHz@1.39v LLC=6 | 2x4GB Crucial-DDR4-2133CL15@14-14-14-30 1T 2800MHz@1.37v
MSI Armor RX 570 4GB@1395Mhz core@1.168v/1920MHz BiosModded


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#12
June 28, 2018 at 10:38:58
So like I said in post #2, everything seems to be working fine now. Are you suggesting these fixes to ensure proper settings to avoid future performance issues? I appreciate all the help I'm just not sure what we're addressing now.

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#13
June 28, 2018 at 11:06:20
im not sure either, didnt read the entire thread

i5-6600K[delid]@4.8GHz/4.4GHz@1.39v LLC=6 | 2x4GB Crucial-DDR4-2133CL15@14-14-14-30 1T 2800MHz@1.37v
MSI Armor RX 570 4GB@1395Mhz core@1.168v/1920MHz BiosModded


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#14
June 28, 2018 at 19:54:07
Looks like you found the motherboard model, which just as easily could have been found when you had the case open to install the card. It's just below the PCIe x 16 slot. https://www.asus.com/media/global/p...

Now that you have the model number, you can go to the Asus site to download a copy of the manual, get drivers, update the BIOS, etc.
https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboard...
https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboard...
https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboard...

The power supply is another issue. You should know the make/model. Wattage is only semi-important, it's the rest of the specs that dictate the quality. The model info & amperage specs should be on the label.
https://linustechtips.com/main/uplo...


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