Cant put full native resolution on my LCD

Asus Nvidia geforce 9600gt graphics card...
August 28, 2010 at 11:04:39
Specs: Windows 7, AMD Athalon x2 dual core 4800 2.50 GHz /3GB
I am attempting to connect my 1080p television as a second monitor but my computer will not let me put any higher than a 1440 x 900 resolution screen up on it. Its native resolution is 1920x1080. what can I do?

I have a Nvidia 9600 GT Graphics card and a 37" Vizio E37OVL 1080p LCD.


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#1
August 28, 2010 at 11:26:01
Are you using widescreen 16:9 resolution on the tv?

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#2
August 28, 2010 at 11:32:16
Yeah it is 16:9 and show 1440x900 clearly but I would like to use the full 1920x1080. My computer only recognizes it as a non pnp monitor so I would assume the problem is in detection. It is connected through a vga cable.

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#3
August 28, 2010 at 12:09:18
"My computer only recognizes it as a non pnp monitor ..."

You have to load either Generic PNP monitor drivers or the specific monitor drivers for the TV's display.

RIGHT click on a blank part of the main desktop screen, choose Properties - Personalize - Display Properties. That window shows you which monitor drivers and video adapter drivers have been loaded.
Click on the display for the TV.
NOTE that the video adapters drivers shown there must be the correct ones.

If the monitor drivers are not Generic PNP, or are not specific...

RIGHT click on a blank area of the main desktop screen, choose Properties - Personalize - Display Settings - Advanced Settings - Monitor - Properties - Driver - Update Driver - Browse my computer.... - Let me pick from a list... - Next - choose (click on it to highlight it) Generic PNP monitor if it's listed - Next
( if Generic PNP monitor is not listed, click on the small box beside Show compatible hardware to remove the checkmark - Standard monitor Types - choose Generic PNP monitor - Next)
(OR - if you have the CD that came with the monitor (the TV in this case) that has the specific drivers for the monitor, or a download that has the specific drivers for the model, click on Have disk lower right, Next, and go to where the drivers are - Windows is looking for an *.inf file. NOTE that if the monitor is LCD or Plasma, you should load the specific drivers if they are available, because you can choose settings in Generic PNP Monitor mode that can DAMAGE the monitor ! )
Close (or if you chose specific drivers, if there is a list of models, choose the correct one, etc. )
click on Close on the Driver window.
click on OK on the Monitor window.
click on OK on the Display Settings Window
close the Personalize window.

When you Restart or start the computer after that, the subject monitor should display fine (on the TV in this case). .
........

There may or may not be a program on the CD that came with the TV that will install the drivers.
You may need to run the download you got from the web to extract the *.inf file you need - doing that may or may not install the drivers by auto running a program that does that.

In either case, if the drivers were already installed, you don't have to click on Have Disk - the proper drivers will be listed under the brand's listings, when you click on the check mark beside Show compatible hardware to remove the checkmark.
......

If specific drivers are loaded for the LCD monitor model (the TV display in this case) , Windows will by default show you only the resolutions and other display settings the LCD monitor model can use that are supported by both the monitor drivers and the specific video drivers. Set the resolution to the Optimal or Native resolution your LCD model is supposed to use, if you you can.

If you can't choose the Optimal or Native resolution , choose a resolution that has the same ratio of width to height, when you divide the width by the height, and switch on Clear Type.
Turn on Clear Type in Windows XP or Vista - makes type/fonts on LCD screens look clearer:
http://www.microsoft.com/typography...

1440 x 900 is a 16:10 ratio (1.600 to 1) not a 16:9 ratio (1.777 to 1).

1920 x 1080 IS a 16:9 ratio (1.777 to 1).


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