Solved Cannot install operating system on Compaq Armada 1700

February 11, 2012 at 03:05:07
Specs: Windows NT 4.0 (Actually there is no operating system on the computer), Pentium 2 (I dont know what speed)
I have a big problem with my Compaq Armada 1700. I cannot install any operating system, because the CD drive doesn't work. My hard drive is not installed, so there is no way to copy files over to the hard drive. But the floppy drive works. The HDD is a Hitachi 4GB hard drive. Is there any BOOTABLE hard drive utility to install the HDD, and then install an operating system over floppies like Windows NT Workstation 4.0 or something? Am i screwed or what?
BTW: It's not possible to get into BIOS. The BIOS were on the HDD and not the motherboard, and the HDD has been formatted.
Can anyone help me?

See More: Cannot install operating system on Compaq Armada 1700

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✔ Best Answer
February 11, 2012 at 16:08:45
"It doesn't matter if I buy a new CD drive or not. I have set it to deafult BIOS settings, and floppy is chosen as the first boot device"

The fact that you can access the BIOS should tell you that it's NOT on the hard drive. And of course the floppy is set as the 1st boot device, it's the ONLY bootable device! You said the HDD isn't even connected so obviously it won't be listed as an option & if the CD drive is bad, it won't be listed as an option either.

What are your plans for this antique anyway? How about temporarily connecting the hard drive to another system, installing Win9x on it, then putting it back in the Compaq? Both Win95 & Win98 will transfer from one system to another with minimal hassle. Or you could buy a CD drive? Or you can search for someone who's selling the complete Win95 floppy pack - 13 floppies for the 1st version, 26 floppies for OSR2.1. You'd need a later version (OSR2 or better) because the early version only supported up to 2GB HDD. Good luck finding it.



#1
February 11, 2012 at 04:19:21
http://h18002.www1.hp.com/products/...

If you install the hard drive surely you can re-install the BIOS, obviously the drive would need to formatted but that can be done with a W98SE Boot Floppy ?

http://www.bootdisk.com/bootdisk.htm

http://h20000.www2.hp.com/bizsuppor...

Googling is quicker than waiting for an answer....


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#2
February 11, 2012 at 05:45:29
Thank you for your answer. I need my old computer with a floppy drive and Windows Me make the floppy. So, in a couple of days i will tell you if it worked or not:-)

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#3
February 11, 2012 at 08:16:52
Apparently the Compaq Armada 1700 was Retired (discontinued) on March 1, 2000 .

If I were you I would move on to something newer.
....

It have an old desktop computer - K6-III 400 - that has Win 98 (first edition) on it.

It's getting difficult to use a computer with an operating system on it older than 2000 on the internet these days.
You can't install an IE version higher than 6.x on those older operating systems, and many web sites no longer support 6.x properly.
You can't install newer versions of any web browser in those older operating systems, although you may be able to install a newer version than IE 6.x is.
You get many web pages where it requires a newer version of the Adobe (formerly Macromedia) Flash player, but you cannot successfully install it.

I have recently found there is an open source "patch" program that allows you to install newer web browsers on older operating systems and the latest version of the Flash Player. After installing that, I installed the newest version of the Opera browser, but found an older version (that's much newer than IE 6.x) works better with the computer. You can play videos on the web that you couldn't play in IE 6.x, the sound for it works fine, however, because of the relatively slow speed of the computer, the best you get is a freeze frame result. You can sometimes RIGHT click on the video while it's playing and choose Global settings and set that to the lowest graphics setting to get more freeze frames, but that often won't work.
....

There is no way I know of to install any Microsoft operating system newer than Dos / Win 3.1 from only floppy disks.

If you have an operating system CD for ME or Win 9x (I recomend 98 or 98SE - I know the most about 98SE - most Win 95 CDs have no support for USB), or NT (I know almost nothing about NT), there is a way of preparing a hard drive on another computer that has a working optical drive, then installing it on you computer and you run Setup on your own computer, from the hard drive.

- or - you can do similar by having prepared a flash drive with enough to make it bootable, and have the necessary files on it, IF the computer has USB ports, IF and only if your bios can be set to boot the computer from a USB drive (not likely in your old bios version - I can't do that in my circa 2000 mboard's bios) to install Windows on your hard drive

however it would be FAR easier if you bought yourself a replacement optical drive.

Your computer has a 9 character specific model product number on a label on the outside of it - xxxxxx-xxx.

Go here:
http://partsurfer.hp.com/search.aspx
Scroll down a bit.
Look for the similar label on the outside of your computer.
The Product number - that's on the third line.

Enter that product number there to search with, you will get a list of parts for your model and their HP part numbers.

Then you use the HP part number of the CD-rom or DVD-rom drive to search on the web with.

I picked one product number after searching using: Armada 1700.

It's likely all the Aramada 1700 specific models used the same optical drives..

316257-001 CD-ROM drive - 24X-max read speed

316295-001 DVD-rom drive (reads CDs too)

I searched the web with both numbers - nothing found for the CD-rom drive.

The DVD-rom drive's number does produce "hits"

E.g.
possible DVD-rom drive
http://www.cygnussupply.com/search....

....and I found this info
"....searching Google or eBay for "Armada 1750 DVD" turns up several matches for the OEM DVD drive for the Armada 1700 and 1750 - part number 316295-001 (or 316258-B21 - the kit version)".




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Related Solutions

#4
February 11, 2012 at 08:33:15
"I cannot install any operating system, because the CD drive doesn't work"

Did it occur to you to replace the CD drive? A brand new DVD burner sells for about $20. You should be able to pick up a used CD-ROM drive for about $5. Or you can buy an old computer from Goodwill or Amvets for about $20.


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#5
February 11, 2012 at 09:38:41
It doesn't matter if I buy a new CD drive or not. I have set it to deafult BIOS settings, and floppy is chosen as the first boot device. So i need that damn BIOS! Is there any bootable BIOS.
And i'm not gonna use this computer at the internet. This is what i want to do:
1. Get the BIOS working.
2. Get the Windows 98 floppy version (If there is any)
3. Install Windows 98 SE.
4. Install nsub33 mass storage device drivers so i can use a USB flash drive.
5. Install Windows 2000 from USB (When i bought this computer Windows 2000 was installed on the HDD)

Thanks for every answer


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#6
February 11, 2012 at 11:59:27
In some bioses, a device does NOT show up in the Boot Order or similar list unless the bios has detected that it's connected.

All computer mboards have a bios - they cannot work and communicate with the operating system without it !

However, on old computers, especially laptops, they MAY store your custom Cmos settings on the hard drive, and you MAY need some other way of accessing the bios Setup if a program or other necessary data to access it is not present on the hard drive.
.....

If you don't have this, download it:

Service manual- Armada 1700 SM.pdf - 152 pages
http://www.eserviceinfo.com/downloa...

Scroll down to
Download >> To download the file, please, click here !
and click on it.

See the info about how to access Computer Setup (what they call their bios setup).

If that doesn't work, then it requires that some program or other data is present on the hard drive.

In that case download this....


HP's
Computer Setup for Portables

Copy this link into your browser's address box...

ftp://ftp.hp.com/pub/softpaq/sp8501-9000/sp8975.exe

It's a direct download.
If it doesn't pop up, look for a probably orange "0% of sp8975.exe .." button in your taskbar at the bottom of the main desktop screen, and click on it

sp8975.exe makes a floppy that has data on it that allows you to access the bios Setup, called Computer Setup in the Armada 1700 Service Manual.

I have foud posts that confirms it works with the Aramada 1700 series.
..................


" Install nsub33 mass storage device drivers so i can use a USB flash drive."

Win 98 and 98SE have no built in support for recognizing USB flash drives - ME was the first Windows version that did.
It used to be that when you bought a new flash drive, there were drivers on a CD or a floppy disk that came with it that you could install for Win 98 or 98SE for that brand's flash drives, and / or those drivers were available from the brand's web site, but that's rarely the case these days, and if the brand does have drivers on their web site these days they're usually only available for Win 98SE, and in any case they often don't work with other brands of flash drives.

I've found these drivers to be a very good solution...

Generic USB Mass Storage drivers for Win 98 or 98SE ...

They also support many other USB devices including many USB 2.0 controllers and USB 2.0 devices.

See response 8 for detailed info:
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...
.....

"5. Install Windows 2000 from USB "

Search on the web for info about that - there are probably lots of hits.

However, you can ONLY install 2000 that way
"....IF and only if your bios can be set to boot the computer from a USB drive (not likely in your old bios version - I can't do that in my circa 2000 mboard's bios)...."

If you CAN'T boot the computer from a USB drive, and you have no internal optical drive, then your ONLY choice is the other one I described - preparing the hard drive on another computer, then running a network Setup from it on your own computer.
....

Install 2000 or XP from a USB optical drive ?

You would have to be able to set your bios to boot from a USB drive.

The 2000 and XP CD contents CANNOT recognize a USB optical drive model unless it was available when the Windows version was first released - in the case of XP, that's circa 2001, for 2000 that would probably be circa 1999 (it was first released in late 1999).

If the initial files loaded from the CD can't recognize the USB optical drive model, if you can set your bios to boot from a USB drive, the CD is recognized as bootable, but when you access it, all you see is a blue screen and nothing further happens.

The only way you can fix that problem is to add the Plug-n-Play ID string of the USB optical drive you're using to the proper location in the contents of a "slipstreamed" burned CD made from the contents of the original CD.


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#7
February 11, 2012 at 12:15:25
#5 gave you some pointers in my response #1

Googling is quicker than waiting for an answer....


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#8
February 11, 2012 at 12:58:48
If you get yourself an internal optical drive....

You may be able to restore the orIginal brand name Windows 2000 software installation if you can find the Recovery disks for your model.

When you search on the web for Recovery or Restore CDs or disks, most "hits" are for single CDs or DVDs you use to attempt to get your system working properly again - they don't have an operating system to install on your computer, and they are not the same as the specific ones for your model.

There are a small number of web sites where you can buy Recovery or Restore disk sets for your specific brand name model - this is especially useful for models that never had them, or had them but you can no longer order them from the brand name web site. Many of them were made by people who had the model and DID make the set when the computer was working fine, then sold those or copies of those to the web site; some are copies of the original CDs that came with the computer when new that people may not have because they bought the computer used.

Try here:
http://www.digitalmedia-labs.com/
http://www.restoredisks.com/
http://www.myrecoverycds.com/

If they don't list your exact model, if you contact them, they MAY be able to provide you with them - e.g. the same disks may be used for several or many models made by the brand at about the same time.


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#9
February 11, 2012 at 16:08:45
✔ Best Answer
"It doesn't matter if I buy a new CD drive or not. I have set it to deafult BIOS settings, and floppy is chosen as the first boot device"

The fact that you can access the BIOS should tell you that it's NOT on the hard drive. And of course the floppy is set as the 1st boot device, it's the ONLY bootable device! You said the HDD isn't even connected so obviously it won't be listed as an option & if the CD drive is bad, it won't be listed as an option either.

What are your plans for this antique anyway? How about temporarily connecting the hard drive to another system, installing Win9x on it, then putting it back in the Compaq? Both Win95 & Win98 will transfer from one system to another with minimal hassle. Or you could buy a CD drive? Or you can search for someone who's selling the complete Win95 floppy pack - 13 floppies for the 1st version, 26 floppies for OSR2.1. You'd need a later version (OSR2 or better) because the early version only supported up to 2GB HDD. Good luck finding it.


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#10
February 12, 2012 at 04:28:05
So, is it possible to move the HDD over to another computer, install Windows 98 Second Edition, and then move the HDD back in the Armada?

If i did that, i thought the system would crash, and not work.


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#11
February 12, 2012 at 08:13:06
When you install a hard drive that already has Windows 2000 or XP on it that was set up on another computer, if the difference in hardware is more than a little different, 2000 or XP often cannot deal with the change and will not boot all the way into Windows - typically you see the first bit of Windows graphics, then a black screen with a blinking cursor top left and nothing further happens.
Or - sometimes you get other symptoms, such as the operating system reboots the computer before Windows has fully loaded.

In that case you need to run a Repair installation of Windows procedure, often called, incorrectly in my opinion, a Repair install.
You CANNOT do that procedure if you have no internal optical drive, and in MOST cases if you have a USB optical drive .
(There IS a Repair installation of Windows procedure for XP - I don't know if that's available for 2000.)
...........

If you can set the bios to boot the computer from a USB drive, use the install 2000 from a USB flash drive method !
.......

If you can't set the bios to boot the computer from a USB drive......

The following assumes your drive is an IDE drive.
If you have an SATA hard drive, there are additional things you need to be informed about.
You can do all of the following with a SATA hard drive if the mboard's bios Setup is set to recognize it as an IDE compatible drive and the mboard has a SATA controller the SATA drive is connected to. Other situations CAN be more complicated.

What you do is
- connect the hard drive to the other working computer (that has Windows 2000 or above running on it - I'm assuming it has 2000 or XP, but it can be Vista or Windows 7) , such that it's connected and / or the bios settings for the computer is (are) NOT booting from it.

- delete ALL existing partitions on your hard drive in Disk Management. (Optionally, you can use the older operating system's Fdisk to do that, later. It identifies any NTFS partition as a unknown type or similar but can delete it.)
(Optionally, if your hard drive is large enough and has more than one existing partition, you could delete one of more partitions and leave one or more intact - you just need a reasonable amount of un-allocated space you can make a small partition for the older operating system and make another larger partition later to install 2000 (or XP) on.)

- boot the computer using something such as a Startup floppy disk for an older operating system you want to use - the disk must have Fdisk and Format on it when it has fully loaded.
OR, boot the other computer from the Dos 7.x or Win 9x or ME full version CD, which will load the same initial files the Startup floppy disk loads.

- use Dos 7's or Win 9x's or ME's (whichever older operating system you can install) Fdisk and Fomat to make one SMALL partition on your hard drive, e.g. 2 gb (= 2,048 mb)

- install the older operating system on that partition - run Setup when it's CD is in a drive.
(If all the other partitions on the hard drive(s) on that other computer are NTFS, the older operating system cannot "see" those partitions. )

- boot the other computer normally
- this may not be required but it's a good idea, just in case - go to Control Panel - Folder Options - View tab, and enable showing hidden files and folders AND enable showing protected operating system files.
- copy the \i386 folder (including all of it's contents) from the 2000 (or XP) CD to the small partition on your drive.

- remove the hard drive and connect it to your computer, such that it's connected and / or the bios settings for the computer IS (ARE) booting from it
- the older operating system will load and accommodate to the changed mboard hardware and install generic drivers if needed - it will take longer for it to load the first time, but it will load.
(NOTE that, that won't work for more recent mboards designated not compatible with operating systems before 2000.)

- use a command for a file in the \i386 folder (that was copied from the 2000 or XP CD) to run the network install version of Setup
- make at least one partition on the un-allocated space on the drive, run Setup and install 2000 (or XP) on it.
(If you want more than one partition on the new Windows installation, change the default size for the partition Windows will be installed on to something smaller, 1,024 mb per gb, then make one or more partition in Disk Management later after Setup has finished in the remaining un-allocated space.)

(In your case you haven't got a lot of drive space - do the default - make a single partition that uses the entire un-allocated drive space.)

- run 2000's (or XP's) actual Setup

- when Setup has finished, you will probably then have either
- a dual boot situation where you can boot either the older operating system or 2000 (or XP)
- or - only 2000 (or XP) will boot
(I haven't tried this method myself.)

- copy the \i386 folder from the older operating system's partition to the 2000's (or XP's) partition Windows was installed on, so that in the future you won't need to insert the operating system CD when that would normally be required.
......

- if you want to get rid of the older operating system's partition, use a third party "partition manipulation" program in 2000 (or XP) , such as the freeware Easeus Partition Master Home Edition, to delete the older operating system's partition, and either use that program to add the un-allocated space created by doing that to the 2000's (or XP's) partition, OR use that or Disk Management in 2000 (or XP ) to make that un-allocated space into a second usable partition.
(Microsoft operating systems themselves previous to Vista can't add un-allocated space to an existing partition that has data on it.)

If you DID have this situation
- a dual boot situation where you can boot either the older operating system or 2000 (or XP)
...you will need to Edit Boot.ini to eliminate the now useless older operating system choice.
........

More details.....

See response 11 and 12:
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...

A newer subject thread, the same things re-stated:

See response 5, 6, and 7:
http://www.computing.net/answers/wi...

Response 6 has the poster of the subject's summary of the procedure I pointed to.

Response 7 has some SATA info.
......

Obviously, it's MUCH easier to install Windows if you get yourself a replacement internal optical drive !!



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#12
February 13, 2012 at 09:23:57
After it has finished copying files, i'll move the hard drive from the Compaq Evo N620c (I used the Evo to copy the files) back to the Compaq Armada 1700. Then i'll just boot 2000, and finish the installation. This almost worked when i tried it yesterday. But the computer wouldn't boot Xp (I couldn't find the 2000 cd). I just got a BSoD, and it said: Your system isn't fully ACPI compliant. Run setup again, and when it says: Press F6 to install a third party SCSI or RAID driver, press F7. Some websites says that i should press F5. What should i do? F5 or F7.

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#13
February 13, 2012 at 14:13:23
I included info about installing XP in response 11 because I wanted to reference response 11 to other people in the future.

You would be much better off if you installed 2000 rather than XP !

You SHOULD NOT install XP on your Armada 1700 !
The minimum system requirements for XP are much higher than they are for 2000.

E.g. How much ram do you have ?
XP just barely runs as it should when it has 256 mb of ram - it should have 512 mb or more to run reasonably well - 2000 will run well with less ram
If you have less than 256mb of ram, your hard drive that Windows was installed on will be accessed a lot more than it would be if you had more ram - you will hear it grinding away, and it will take a lot longer than if you had more ram for anything to load in XP !

I have installed XP on old slower systems, but not on a system as old as yours.
At the time your laptop was made, the performance / cpu / etc. of a laptop lagged behind desktop computers about two years.

Those Windows XP installations were / are really slow with 256mb of ram, and better but still slow with 512 mb.
If you have less than 256 mb of ram, it can take ten minutes or more for the hard drive activity to slow down enough, or stop, after the desktop screen has initially loaded on those systems, before you can do what you want to do without it not working properly.
....

2000 and XP are incompatible with the ACPI support, or lack of ACPI support, of some older mboards. 2000 may be incompatible with fewer such mboards.

You can install 2000 or XP on such mboards if you do it a certain way that doesn't install the operating system's ACPI support - I've seen that somewhere for installing XP the regular way, by installing it from it's CD in an internal optical drive. but I don't recall what it said.

"Run setup again, and when it says: Press F6 to install a third party SCSI or RAID driver,..."

It ALWAYS displays that near the beginning of Setup ! Pressing F6 will not solve your problem.
You don't need to press F6 unless
- you have a mboard that has a SATA drive controller built in,you have a SATA drive connected to it you want to install Windows on, and you have that drive controller iset to SATA or AHCI mode in the bios
- you have an IDE or SATA drive controller card in a mboard slot the hard drirve you want to install Windows on is connected to

Try searching the web for something such as: install XP or 2000 without ACPI support.


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#14
February 13, 2012 at 14:53:55
Ram specs for your computer

Specifications

•Banks: 1 (one slot)
•Fixed RAM: 32MB (non-removable)
•Maximum RAM: 160MB
•Speed: 66MHz
•Standard RAM: 32MB


You can use PC100 modules - the PC100 spec itself is backwards compatible with the PC66 spec - as long as the module is otherwise compaible with using it in your mboard - e.g. a 128 mb module probably MUST have 8 chips on it - but they will run at 66 mhz, max, not 100 mhz.

Your computer will be REALLY SLOW in XP even if you have installed the max amount of ram.

It will run Win 95, 98, 98SE or ME WELL with 128 mb of ram or more (96 mb or less causes the hard drive to be accessed a lot more) , and run 2000 SLOW with the max amount of ram.

In comparison, I can install up to 768 mb of PC100 or PC133 ram in my circa 2000 K6-III 400 mhz desktop computer's SS7 mboard. It's FSB and CPU runs at 100mhz or a bit more - your FSB and CPU runs at 66 mhz. I can overclock certain cpus to 600 mhz, or a little more if I use PC133 ram .



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#15
February 14, 2012 at 06:29:44
This is the specs:

No operating system
IBM TravelStar 6GB HDD
160MB of RAM
Pentium 2 400 MHz (or something like that)
I'm NOT, i mean, NOT gonna install XP. I'M GONNA INSTALL 2000, because i know 2000 works with this computer.


I'M JUST GONNA GET THIS CRYSTAL CLEAR: 2000 WORKS WITH THIS COMPUTER, AND THE ARMADA IS NOT "VERY SLOW" WITH 2000. I HAVE TRIED IT MYSELF.

Forget XP.

I have read, that to DISABLE ACPI, just press F7 when it says "Press F6 to install a third-party SCSI or RAID driver."

THE BSoD SAYS THAT I HAVE TO PRESS F7! AND I MEAN F7, NOT F6. SO WHEN IT SAYS "PRESS F6 TO INSTALL A THIRD-PARTY SCSI OR RAID DRIVER", OR YOU CAN ALSO CALL IT "TEXT-BASED PART OF SETUP".


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#16
February 14, 2012 at 06:33:27

This ("http://support.microsoft.com/kb/256841") confirms that i have to press F7 when it says "Press F6 to install a third party SCSI or RAID driver" to disable ACPI.

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#17
February 14, 2012 at 06:37:09
Quote: Reboot the computer to restart Setup.
When Setup starts again, press F7 when you see the "Press F6 if you need to install a third-party SCSI or RAID driver" screen.

This quote is from theMICROSOFT WEBSITE


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#18
February 14, 2012 at 07:48:17
You said....
"This almost worked when i tried it yesterday. But the computer wouldn't boot Xp (I couldn't find the 2000 cd)..... "
You didn't specifically say you found the 2000 CD after that, although I see now you did say...
". Then i'll just boot 2000, and finish the installation."

What I said was it will "....run 2000 SLOW with the max amount of ram. " , not REALLY SLOW.
....

I've never encountered a mboard that had the incompatible ACPI problem with the 2000 or XP CDs, and I said above....
"....I've seen that somewhere for installing XP the regular way, by installing it from it's CD in an internal optical drive. but I don't recall what it said. ."

There's no need to repeat several times that you need to press the F7 key - if that's what you need to do, fine.
....

Whenever you load Windows from scratch, after Setup is finished you must load the drivers for the mboard, particularly the main chipset drivers, in order for Windows to have the proper drivers for and information about your mboard hardware, including it's AGP or PCI-E, ACPI, USB 2.0 if it has it, and hard drive controller support. If you have a generic system and have the CD that came with the mboard, all the necessary drivers are on it. If you load drivers from the web, brand name system builders and mboard makers often DO NOT have the main chipset drivers listed in the downloads for your model - in that case you must go to the maker of the main chipset's web site, get the drivers, and load them.

In your case, the 2000 CD may or may not already have the support for your main chipset built into it, since 2000 first came out in late 1999. It does no harm to install the Intel main chipset drivers when you're not sure about that.

NOTE that for early Intel 8xx main chipsets, if Intel lists the IAA - Intel Application Acceleratoir - in the downloads for your main chipset, you MUST install it in order for your hard drive(s) and optical drive(s) to be able to run at the full max burst speed they are capable of.
If the IAA IS listed there, you should install the INF Update Utility (main chipset "drivers") to make sure 2000 is properly informed about the capabilities of the main chipset, THEN install the IAA.
After you have installed the IAA, Intel Application Accelerator will be listed in your All Programs list. You have to access that to see which DMA mode your drives are running in, rather than in Device Manager - IDE / ATAPI Controllers - Primary or Secondary IDE Channel - Advanced Settings tab (that tab isn't there after you have installed the IAA).

NOTE that if you're using onboard video, Intel often lists enhanced video drivers for the video built into the 8xx main chipsets that are newer than the original video drivers. If you install those your video settings will be more versatile - more settings to choose from. When you RIGHT click on a blank part of the main desktop screen, there will be a listing for those settings, rather than you selecting Properties (goes to Display Properties) after RIGHT clicking, then Settings where there will be fewer settings choices.
....

Even if you don't intend on using the internet once 2000 has been fully installed, you should connect to it so that the available updates for 2000 can be installed. That will install bug fixes, although many of the updates are security fixes you wouldn't need if you're not going to use the internet all the time. If you set Automatic Update to non default settings so that it informs you when updates are available but does not download or install them automatically, a yellow shield icon will pop up in your task bar and when you click on that you can choose which ones you install, and download them when you want to download them. If your 2000 CD does not have the Windows SP4 updates built into it, you should install them.
OR - you can go the the Microsoft Windows Update page to have it do an Express search for updates to speed up the updating process, however, you may NOT be able to de-select Security updates when you do that.

You don't need to install anti-malware software if the only places you go on the internet are sites that are likely to be very well protected from malware - e.g. the Microsoft and Adobe web sites (you may be required to install an Adobe Flash player version from the Adobe web site). If you use IE to access the internet, 2000 comes with something less than IE 6.x - you may be required to install a higher IE version - install IE 8 if you are.
Or - install some other newer browser version, although that may NOT work with the Microsoft Windows Update page.


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#19
February 15, 2012 at 12:47:02
Drivers is not a problem. I think the HP/ Compaq site is the easiest place to download drivers from in the whole world.

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#20
February 15, 2012 at 13:17:06
The HP web site probably doesn't have the IAA. It's effect is similar to the enhanced IDE drivers you install for other brands of older main chipsets.
If the Intel web site lists the IAA for your 8xx main chipset, there will be a noticable improvement in performance after it has been installed.
You'll also benefit from the Intel enhanced video drivers listed there if HP doesn't have that version - for versatility, more available settings. If one or more of the versions listed there has a date newer than the HP video drivers, they're likely, or one of them is likely, the enhanced version.
I forgot to mention that if you install the enhanced version I'm talking of, there will be an icon in your taskbar that looks like an LCD monitor, which as I recall you can RIGHT click on to access the same set of settings. If you don't see that icon when you install the HP supplied video drivers, HP's drivers are probably older and not enhanced.

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#21
February 15, 2012 at 16:25:58
http://distrowatch.com/?newsid=07099

larry


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#22
February 17, 2012 at 12:13:37
Thanks everybody. The Armada is now working. I sucsessfully installed Windows Milennium Edition, but i'm gonna install 2000 on it soon.

But i have another problem; It has two speakers, but only the left one is working. I know the speaker isn't broken. When i go to device manager, it says that there is "A resource conflict" Code 15.

There's two "System speakers" in device manager, and it's just the only one that got the error.


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#23
February 17, 2012 at 15:43:52
Have you figured out where you put your 2000 CD yet ? If NO, if you have more than one computer, I have many computers and sometimes I forget to remove a Windows CD from one of their drives, and that's where it turns out it was.

The same as for 2000 and XP, you must install the main chipset drivers after Setup has finished. The Intel main chipset drivers for the 8xx series for laptops are different from those for desktop computers - the former has support for more possible devices built into laptops.

If you didn't install those, ME may not have the correct info about your mboard or the devices built into it.
E.g. ME may not have the correct info about how your main chipset assigns IRQs to devices.

Motherboard "drivers" are actually all, or mostly, *.inf (information) files that inform Windows about the capabilities of the mboard - Windows usually uses software support already built into the operating system when it has that proper information.
.....

"But i have another problem; It has two speakers, but only the left one is working. I know the speaker isn't broken. When i go to device manager, it says that there is "A resource conflict" Code 15."

There is no software sound problem I know of that causes sound on one side, other than it's set to one side in your sound mixer settings - either both work or they don't.

I'm assuming that you have installed the correct sound drivers, if ME's Setup didn't install them automatically

RIGHT click on the speaker icon in your taskbar, choose Volume Control.
If there is a horizontal slider setting below the main volume control, make sure it's in the middle (my sound adapter on my circa 2000 K6-III 400 desktop computer doesn't have that).

"... I know the speaker isn't broken..."

Are you talking about internal speakers or external speakers ?

If internal speakers....

The headphones jack on laptops and netbooks has a mechanical switch inside of it. It's supposed to disable the sound from going to the speakers built into the laptop or netbook whenever you plug a plug (on a cord) into the headphones jack.
If you have plugged into the headphones jack a lot, it's common for that mechanical switch to malfunction. You could try plugging a plug into the headphones jack, wiggling it, then pulling it out, that may get one or both speakers working, but the only real solution is to replace the headphones jack - that's an item frequently replaced by laptop repair places.
OR - you could make do by plugging amplified speakers into the headphones jack.

If external amplified speakers.....

Have you tried them with another computer ?
Whether or not the speaker itself works, it's common for wires to be damaged inside the cord, particularly near the stereo plug, which could certainly account for one side not working, and sometimes when the wiring is damaged, one side of the stereo amp inside the amplified speakers is damaged and produces less volume or nothing. Replacing the stereo plug and chopping off the last part (e.g. 1/2 inch) of the cord when you wire it up may or may not fix the problem.
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"When i go to device manager, it says that there is "A resource conflict" Code 15."

If that's NOT for the sound adapter, which device is it for ?

If that's for the sound adapter....

I'm assuming that you have installed the correct sound drivers, if ME's Setup didn't install them automatically

Go to Device Manager - Sound video and game controllers,
double click on the sound adapter's name , click on the Resources tab .

You MAY see which resource in the list there is the problem, and you MAY be able to fix the problem - you may NOT be able to if it's a Plug-n-Play device.

Remove the check mark in the small box before Use automatic settings if there's one there.
(If there was no check mark there, you could try clicking on it to insert the check mark, click on OK at the bottom of the Window, Restart the computer then see if there is still a resource conflict there.)

Then - either
- if there is more than one possible configuration in the box beside Setting based on, try selecting a different configuration - if you can , select one, then look in the list to see if there is still a resource conflict - if there isn't, click on OK at the bottom of the Window.

or - choose (highlight) the resource setting in the list that has the conflict, then click on Change setting, to see if you can set that to another setting that does not have a conflict - if you can , click on OK at the bottom of the Window.

When there is no check mark in the small box before Use automatic settings, when you click on OK at the bottom of the window, you will get a message regarding the device will be forced to use the settings you chose. That's sometimes what you need to do to get a device to work properly in ME back to 95.
....

If you can' get rid of the conflict by doing one of those things,
- you MAY be able to change the resource setting for the device it is conflicting with in Device Manager
- try going into the bios Setup to see if there is a setting similar to PNP operating system - Yes or No - if you see that, try changing it to the opposite setting, Save bios settings.
OR - in any case, you could try loading bios defaults in the bios Setup, Save bios settings.
....

NOTE that resource conflicts are not always identified specfically in ME back to 95.

If you don't see what the problem is in Device Manager, try looking in System Information.

Shortcut
Start - Run - type: msinfo32, click OK.

On the left side

- Hardware - Conflicts/Sharing
Is there anything flagged, e.g., in red ?

- Hardware - IRQs - there should be 16 IRQs there (0 to 15) . More than one device may be using the same IRQ number.
Are there any numbers missing ?
Are there any that are using the same IRQ number that have more than one device other than IRQ Holder ?

- Hardware - Forced Hardware - anything there ? If there is, that doesn't necessarily indicate a problem, but does indicate automatic settings were NOT used for it - e.g. I often had to use non-default settings for sound adapters in 98 and 98SE, including presently on my circa 2000 K6-III 400 Win 98 desktop computer .

- Components - Problem Devices - anything there ?



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#24
February 18, 2012 at 01:27:42
It's internal speakers. And i've loaded Windows 2000 on it now.
But yesterday, after I loaded Windows 2000 on it, both speakers played the Windows 2000 startup sound. But now it's just the left speakers that is working.
I had the same problem with Windows ME.

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#25
February 18, 2012 at 05:08:43
Thank you Tubesandwires. The Armada 1700 is now working, and both speakers is also working.

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#26
February 18, 2012 at 07:13:25
What turned out to be the cause of the speaker problem, if you know for sure ?

If the partition ME was installed on is still intact with it's data, are you getting a dual boot situation - you can choose either ME or 2000 when the hard drive boots ?


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