Solved can the dead cmos battery keep it from booting up

June 12, 2015 at 06:42:40
Specs: Windows 95 2 edition
I have an old packard bell model 5x5.2 that wont bootup. i checked the cmos battery which is soldiered in an it's dead. I get no post beeps, the hard drive light comes on for a few seconds and goes off. I also get no video on monitor.

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✔ Best Answer
June 13, 2015 at 06:33:50
Yes, just plonking a multi-meter on the 12V rail with the computer running Windows (idling) will give you no idea about the ability of the PSU to deliver a decent amperage.. The trick is to get the computer running as many intensive programs as you can muster. If the PSU cannot handle that load then the 12V will fall noticeably and give you some indication that it is not up to muster. Put it this way, if it maintains 12V on load then it must be capable of delivering the amps needed for that particular situation.

I'm not trying to undermine expensive load testers but at least the above gives some sort of clue. You have to load it up.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks



#1
June 12, 2015 at 08:56:20
No, a dead CMOS battery will not prevent a system from booting.

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#2
June 12, 2015 at 12:41:20
Sorry, I don't recognise that model. Is it a PC or laptop?

Keep it plugged in for a long while, that might help things along such as dried out electrolytic capacitors.

Although a CMOS battery is not claimed to be rechargeable it does rely on a voltage being kept across it for it to remain refreshed.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#3
June 12, 2015 at 14:15:45
Thanks riider, since it was built in the 90's and being soldiered in thought it was different from the new computer now, it has the old P8 & P9 output connectors on p/s. I'll look else where for the problem. thanks again

message edited by ldcraw


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#4
June 12, 2015 at 14:21:13
Thanks Derek, This is a i guess a mini tower multimedia.I'm buying a ps tester, cpu tester that might help me. thanks again

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#5
June 13, 2015 at 05:34:06
"I'm buying a ps tester, cpu tester that might help me"

For the most part, those testers are useless. And it's very likely that you have an AT power supply, not ATX. The power connections are completely different. The testers I've seen are for ATX only. You can test for voltage using a multimeter or voltmeter but what you can't test for is amperage, & that's what's important.

For example, say you find that the +12v rail is putting out 11.75v (which is within spec). Is the rail capable of delivering & maintaining 10A at +11.75v? It takes professional load testing equipment costing 1000s of dollars to check for that.

http://www.escotal.com/powersupply....

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuco...

http://www.playtool.com/pages/psuco...


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#6
June 13, 2015 at 06:33:50
✔ Best Answer
Yes, just plonking a multi-meter on the 12V rail with the computer running Windows (idling) will give you no idea about the ability of the PSU to deliver a decent amperage.. The trick is to get the computer running as many intensive programs as you can muster. If the PSU cannot handle that load then the 12V will fall noticeably and give you some indication that it is not up to muster. Put it this way, if it maintains 12V on load then it must be capable of delivering the amps needed for that particular situation.

I'm not trying to undermine expensive load testers but at least the above gives some sort of clue. You have to load it up.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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