Can RAM just slow down after years of use?

January 12, 2011 at 15:16:14
Specs: Windows XP
Can motherboard memory just slow down after years of use? How can it be tested for real speed, not the rated speed?

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#1
January 12, 2011 at 15:21:59
Just to clarify this ....
I can buy a system, install stuff run it for several years until I think it's about to die. I can flaten the system and install fresh OS.

BUT it still seems slow!!!!!! It seems much slower than I remember it being when I acquired the machine as a new device. Is this my memory, was WinXP on this machine always that slow, but newer machines have changed my expectations? Can the memory actually slow down?

Do the MB circuits have electronic arthritis?


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#2
January 12, 2011 at 15:35:09
I don't think memory can become slower with age. And even if it did this would not result in poor performance. It would result in an application or system crash. Slow memory would test as bad.

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#3
January 12, 2011 at 15:47:03
"Is this my memory, was WinXP on this machine always that slow, but newer machines have changed my expectations? "
yes
how much ram does it have??

larry


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Related Solutions

#4
January 12, 2011 at 15:51:04
It might seem slower because when you start adding more programs, folders/files, pictures, etc... the hard drive becomes slower in accessing it's data and information stored in it.

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#5
January 12, 2011 at 17:02:30
They could change speed but I doubt you'd notice it either faster or slower.

You use a performance monitor to determine the baseline and then save it for later review and compare.

Why did it take me over a year to phone in a problem to ATT?


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#6
January 12, 2011 at 19:18:25
It is all relative. When you first move up to a newer, faster computer you immediately notice the difference. After using it for a while you get used to it.


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#7
January 12, 2011 at 22:28:27
Assuming it actually is slower with the same hardware and software then maybe it's the hard drive. They can slow down with age.

Real men don't use AntiVirus; they just reformat


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#8
January 13, 2011 at 04:36:06
Dude375 says: ", folders/files, pictures, etc... the h"

No it's not added programs, because I flattened the machine, formatted the harddrive and started over. This newly setup machine seems much slower than I remember it being back when I first bought it. When it was new, it was so fast and snappy, that I thought I would never need another computer. After I rebuild it, I am think this machine is so slow that i might only be useful as a file server stuck in the closet.


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#9
January 13, 2011 at 04:38:51
DAVEINCAPS says: " then maybe it's the hard drive."

That's an idea. If the harddrive is physically slower, then I would see the same slow down. Since I did not benchmark the old harddrive I have nothing to compare to. But, for the future, what are good harddrive benchmarking tools?


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#10
January 13, 2011 at 06:42:35
It would be helpful if you posted the complete system specs. If you only have 256MB RAM, the system will be slow no matter what you do. XP needs at least 512MB to perform reasonably well, but it would be better to have much more - 2GB is the "sweet spot" for XP. Also, when you "flattened" the machine (whatever the heck that means) & reinstalled the OS, did you immediately install all the device drivers? Chipset, video, audio, network, etc? Did you install SP3, IE8 & all the Windows updates? Did you perform any of the performance tweaks such as disabling indexing? Which anti-virus program did you install?

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