Solved Can I override the Front I/O cable failure error in bios?

October 2, 2017 at 20:02:53
Specs: Windows 7
My son moved the motherboard of an Optiplex 790 into a gaming case. The Optiplex has some kind of proprietary front panel lineup that did not match up well with standard front port i/o's, power switch, reset switch, power led and hdd led, etc. Because it was an easier fix, I moved the power switch from the Optiplex to the new case, and it works beautifully. However, he continues to get the error message "Alert! I/O cable failure" every time he turns on the computer. It is not so much a failure as it just not connected on purpose. Is there a way to permanently bypass this error in the bios for the Optiplex 790 that I am failing to see? He can bypass it and use the computer but the message is annoying. Thanks in advance.

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✔ Best Answer
October 3, 2017 at 14:05:14
I suggest you return the board to it's original case & if you want a gaming system, build it from scratch.

That being said, if you were to take the time to trace each individual wire in the Dell case from the motherboard plug back to the power button, reset button, HDD LED, power LED, etc, you should be able to figure out which wire corresponds to the wiring scheme of the new case. I don't buy that it "cannot be fixed".

Here's the pinout diagram for the power switch connector: http://pinoutguide.com/Motherboard/...

And here's the 34-pin front panel connector: https://i.imgur.com/Hxa2Lz2.png



#1
October 2, 2017 at 20:46:35
First you have to identify the I/O that is not connected. Then you will know what to look for to try bypass it. Unfortunately if it is a motherboard from a system manufacture there will be much less options in the BIOS that you can turn off. If you said which one we may have been able to offer more specifics.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
October 3, 2017 at 09:42:59
I don't know why you (or your son) would move that board into a gaming case. Try temporarily disconnecting all the front panel cables except for the power button. That should allow the system to boot. In the meantime, you'll have to research which wires are for which pins. It may mean releasing the individual wire/plugs from the case's plastic connectors so that the wires can be plugged in individually to the pins. Just carefully pry up the tiny tabs on the plastic connector using a pin to release the wire/plugs. This may help:

http://clascsg.uconn.edu/download/s...

Here's a close-up of those tiny tabs that hold the plugs in place: http://www.bcot1.com/IMG_1224b.jpg


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#3
October 3, 2017 at 11:18:01
Thank you Fingers and riider. For the record I did try to establish which I/O is not connected with no luck. The message remained the same. Thank you for the link but I had already troubleshooted with the schematic before I resorted to this forum.

After even more research (after posting this) I found that this is an issue lots of people have when dealing with the Optiplex. The reasons why people would choose to move a motherboard from one case to another probably falls in the hundreds; for my son, I have no idea, but aparently a lot of people have done it because there are a ton of similar questions out there on this issue.

For others who end up having the same issue the answer I found came from Dell: The test/error cannot be disabled. The only way to remove it is to reconnect the cable to the original front panel. The key is in that statement. If the ORIGINAL front panel no longer exists to plug it into, then according to Dell the error cannot be fixed.


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#4
October 3, 2017 at 11:43:34
I imagine if you were able to identify the LED leads, you'd be able to short them together to remove the error, but without a front panel to reference, you'd have a hard time identifying them.

How To Ask Questions The Smart Way


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#5
October 3, 2017 at 14:05:14
✔ Best Answer
I suggest you return the board to it's original case & if you want a gaming system, build it from scratch.

That being said, if you were to take the time to trace each individual wire in the Dell case from the motherboard plug back to the power button, reset button, HDD LED, power LED, etc, you should be able to figure out which wire corresponds to the wiring scheme of the new case. I don't buy that it "cannot be fixed".

Here's the pinout diagram for the power switch connector: http://pinoutguide.com/Motherboard/...

And here's the 34-pin front panel connector: https://i.imgur.com/Hxa2Lz2.png


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