buzzing from line in socket

February 17, 2011 at 05:49:25
Specs: XP
I record spoken word on my computer and I run a condenser mic through a Boss BR1600, connecting from the phono out of the BR1600 , into the line in socket on the computer. I monitor the sound using headphones from the headphone socket, but I have to keep the volume on the computer quite low as to avoid hearing the loud buzzing this produces.
The buzzing doesn't appear on the recording but it's annoying all the same. Ive tried different cables to no avail. Does anyone have any simple but cheap suggestions please?
The sound card is a sigmatel.
Thanks in advance

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#1
February 17, 2011 at 07:50:13
You have a ground loop problem. Try using one of those ground adaptors that let you use a three prong plug into a two prong socket and plug your Boss recorder and computer into that

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#2
February 17, 2011 at 08:26:45
Thanks for your reply. I perhaps should have said I'm in the uk, could I still use a ground adapter? Or am I just showing my ignorance? Thanks

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#3
February 17, 2011 at 08:43:38
Ah, in that case I would check with an electrician or perhaps a DYI store to see what the equivalent is over there to a grounding problem.

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Related Solutions

#4
February 17, 2011 at 08:47:52
Thanks very much for your help. I'll try to find some info on this for the uk.

Cheers,


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#5
February 17, 2011 at 13:06:11
Any lamps or other devices nearby? Almost any electric device nearby can cause it.

"The era of big government is over," said Clinton 1996


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#6
February 17, 2011 at 13:11:07
yes, as a matter of fact there is a lamp nearby on top of my hi fi amp, which is near the BR1600 and computer right beside each other. Space is a bit of an issue. I'll try moving the lamp..... and re arranging other stuff - why didn't I think of that? lol thanks

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#7
February 17, 2011 at 13:37:32
I live in the UK and a ground loop is the same as it is all over the world. It is caused a by a slight difference in the ground potential between two different device. The problem can usually be solved by connecting a ground wire between the two devices.

Stuart


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#8
February 17, 2011 at 17:07:57
I'd be worried about grounding devices. On the surface it seems OK but it may end up being an electrical safety issue. Normally on modern devices the case should NOT have any bonding to ground. If one did and then you connected it to others and a short in the first could cause all of them to be charged.

"The era of big government is over," said Clinton 1996


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#9
February 17, 2011 at 17:09:02
By the way. NEVER use a 3 prong into a 2 prong socket. There is no safe way to do that. You run the risk of electrocution.

"The era of big government is over," said Clinton 1996


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#10
February 17, 2011 at 17:43:11
Normally on modern devices the case should NOT have any bonding to ground.

All mains powered electrical equipment with a metal case should have the case bonded to ground. It is safety thing so if there should be a short circuit to the case the current goes to ground and reduces the chances of an electric shock. That is what the third prong is for.

Having the case bonded to earth will cause a fuse to blow or an RCB to trip. If the case were not bonded to earth, anyone touching a live case will get the full potential of the electric current right through them.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Applia...

Most domestic appliances, like computers and audio equipment come under Class 1

Class II usually applies to portable appliances like power tools and requires double insulation. Computers certainly don't have double insulation.

Stuart


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#11
February 18, 2011 at 17:50:35
A consumer product hasn't been produced in years that has the case bonded. Test it for yourself.

"The era of big government is over," said Clinton 1996


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#12
February 18, 2011 at 17:52:17
Not confusing case from chassis.

"The era of big government is over," said Clinton 1996


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#13
February 18, 2011 at 20:27:56
Not confusing case from chassis.

Same thing.

So whats the point of having a three pin plug if it is not connected to anything.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:E...

Stuart


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#14
February 21, 2011 at 02:18:49
thanks for all your replies.

I appreciate your help.

Cheers.


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