Buy new PC that comes with SSD harddrive

Microsoft Windows 7 ultimate 32-bit
April 3, 2013 at 05:39:24
Specs: Windows 7, n/a
I am looking to buy a New PC that has an internal SSD harddrive
Any suggestions?
I have looked at newegg, but I am thinking of maybe buying the parts myself and building the PC how I want it to be

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#1
April 3, 2013 at 06:21:52
If you know what you're doing, self-built will give you the most control, and it'll cost less than a "gamer PC." However, you'll still spend more than if you bought a Dell, Gateway, or HP.

If you don't know what you're doing, it's a great way to learn. Costly in time and money, though.

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#2
April 3, 2013 at 06:27:30
Thanks!! I am technical. I have done desktop support/server support, and have built PC's before.
Maybe I will just buy a DIY kit from new egg.

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#3
April 3, 2013 at 06:52:53
If you need recommendations on hardware, Something Awful has an okay list.

You might want to buy a smallish SSD, and have a traditional HDD for documents and really large programs. This requires either more setup, or more effort as you go along.

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Related Solutions

#4
April 3, 2013 at 06:53:17
"Maybe I will just buy a DIY kit from new egg"

No, it would be better to "cherry-pick" your own components rather than buying a kit, unless the kit just happens to have what you want without having to make concessions. We can advise with the parts selection if you need help.


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#5
April 3, 2013 at 07:02:05
Razor2.3,
That is exactly what I am planning on, that's what I have now. A 250GB SSB and a secondary 500 GB Sata Drive.

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#6
April 3, 2013 at 07:03:21
Riider,

Yes, I need help. My problem is I know what parts, meaning, video card, harddrive. etc... I am not sure if the RAM is the right type, or the video card is correct for the motherboard.


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#7
April 3, 2013 at 07:09:52
In that case, I suggest you use the 500GB as the drive to hold user directories. To do this "correctly," you'll need to install Windows using the Win7 OPK, or the Win8 ADK, depending on the version of Windows.

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#8
April 3, 2013 at 07:50:13
Razor2.3

I am questioning the need for Win7 OPK.

chrismr

Do you have a full version of Windows 7? Does your DVD include BOTH the 32 bit and 64 bit versions? 32 bit restricts you to 4GB of RAM with an effective useable amount of less than 3GB in most configurations.


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#9
April 3, 2013 at 07:57:02
I have Windows 7 Ultimate 64 bit. I do not believe I have the 32 bit version

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#10
April 3, 2013 at 08:01:47
You posted specs above with Windows 7 32 bit. That is why I asked.

In order to help with hardware we need to know what you intend to do with the computer and what type of budget you have. Will the budget include the OS, monitor, mouse, keyboard?


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#11
April 3, 2013 at 08:05:11
"Yes, I need help"

OK, which CPU, AMD (Athlon, Phenom, FX, etc) or Intel (i3. i5, i7, etc)? RAM choice will depend on the CPU choice & RAM amount will depend on how much you feel you need plus the limitation of the motherboard. Video card choice will depend on primary usage - general purpose, gaming, HTPC, etc.


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#12
April 3, 2013 at 08:34:15
OtheHill: I am questioning the need for Win7 OPK.
Officially, the only time you can specify non-standard locations for the special directories is during the installation of Windows. The only way you can specify a non-standard location during installation is though a custom deployment. To create a custom deployment, you need the OPK.

It's not all a loss, you can use the OPK to answer all of the setup & install questions, so you can start the install and wonder off.

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#13
April 3, 2013 at 08:42:56
Razor2.3

What non standard locations are we talking about? That is what I am confused about.

My understanding here is Windows 7 would be installed on the SSD and Programs to the SATA drive. This is all done without any special installation unless you are referring to an SLP version of Windows. Then it makes sense.

I am assuming this is a full version of Windows 7 64 bit and chrismr has installation disks for any third party programs.


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#14
April 3, 2013 at 08:59:16
I checked all my other posts here, I never mentioned anything about Windows 7 32 bit ?

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#15
April 3, 2013 at 09:16:54
"I never mentioned anything about Windows 7 32 bit ?"

Look at your initial post & what you entered for TAGS:

Tags: Microsoft Windows 7 ultimate 32-bit hard drives ssd


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#16
April 3, 2013 at 09:22:13
oh, that was by accident

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#17
April 3, 2013 at 10:18:49
OtheHill:
I'm talking about not having a "C:\Users" or a "C:\ProgramData", but rather a "D:\Users" or a "D:\ProgramData". Possibly a "D:\Program Files", but I suspect 250GB would be large enough to hold both Windows and programs. (Assumed: SSD = C:, HDD = D:)

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#18
April 3, 2013 at 11:02:59
My budget is about 1,000.00. Looking for an i7
I'm not sure if I want to venture to Windows 8 or stay with Windows 7

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#19
April 3, 2013 at 11:09:50
"Do you want Win8?" Could be better rephrased as, "Do you have multi-touch based input?"

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#20
April 3, 2013 at 11:14:38
not yet, but I could buy one. But the better question is, do I want touch based input.
I dont think I do.

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#21
April 3, 2013 at 11:43:27
Razor

The machine I am typing on has E:\ Program files\. Most of my installed programs are located there.

This was done while inside of Windows. No need for any additional tools. I also have my "Documents on the E: partition. This computer has 3 hard drives with a total of 7 partitions and a USB external. Plus a floppy and two burners.


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#22
April 3, 2013 at 12:11:40
chrismr:
There are use cases for touch, but if they don't apply, then don't force yourself. Metro really isn't designed for traditional PC roles.

OtheHill:
If you're registry hackin' to get the locations moved, that's the unofficial / unsupported way. If it defaults to the C: location and you're redirecting it, that's the extra work I mentioned.

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#23
April 3, 2013 at 12:16:57
You referred to METRO -- what do you mean by that?

And I don't understand your comment regarding use cases for touch?


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#24
April 3, 2013 at 12:17:41
I am NOT hacking. When you go to install most any program you can choose Advanced or something similar. This will allow you to change the path. Usually the original path will show highlighted. I simply change the C to an E or whatever partition I want. I have been doing this since Win98se.

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#25
April 3, 2013 at 12:22:04
Metro is the touch based interface.

How to banish Metro from your Windows 8 PC forever


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#26
April 3, 2013 at 12:52:41
OtheHill:
If you had customized your install with the OPK, you could have skipped that part for the life of your Windows install. Also, you could have had a custom location for user profiles. As I said, more setup up front, or more effort down the road.

chrismr
Basically what riider said. When someone says they don't like Win8, what they mean is they don't like Metro. It technically doesn't have a name, but it was called Metro until some company in . . Germany (I think?) contested the use of that name.

As for the use cases, they tend to be more art-type things, or where a computer is dedicated to a single task that requires a simplified interface. Like a cash register or an interactive kiosk display.

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#27
April 3, 2013 at 13:39:00
Why do they call it Metro?

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#28
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