building new pc

Amd Phenom ii x2 callisto
February 17, 2010 at 15:53:40
Specs: Windows XP / ubuntu 9.10, 2 x 2GB 240 pin ddr2 1066
I am thinking of upgrading my motherboard to an asus m4a77d which supports am3/am2+/am2. I am also looking at the AMD Phenom II x2 dual core processor. My question is if the hyper transport on the processor is 4000 MHz and the hyper transport on the board is 2600 MHz, will there be issues or will it work just fine?

See More: building new pc

Report •

#1
February 17, 2010 at 16:31:24
Look up the cpu compatibility list on the Asus site for asus m4a77d

Report •

#2
February 17, 2010 at 17:04:18
That was helpful thanks. But I guess my question should have been does the hyper transport MHz matter when selecting a motherboard and processor? Up until now I have only built pc's that are all-in-one. I never had to choose the processor to add, it was already supplied. So this is my first attempt at buying board and cpu separately.

Report •

#3
February 17, 2010 at 17:35:22
I understand your concern. I can't answer your question, but like Tubes said, if the Mobo supports that particular processor, it will work. Check the site.

Report •

Related Solutions

#4
February 17, 2010 at 17:40:23
Cool thanks

Report •

#5
February 17, 2010 at 19:27:42
As far as I have seen, hyper transport is an AMD cpu only thing - and the front side bus speed of any mboard is a different thing. The particular cpu may benefit from a higher FSB (front side bus) speed, but they're two different things. You also need to use the ram speed the particular cpu supports, or faster, at it's highest supported FSB speed to get the max performance from the cpu and the system.

I've built three systems for others - one with an AM2 mboard and an Athlon 64 X2 6000+, the other with an AM2+ mboard with an Athlon 64 X2 6000+, and one with an AM2+ mboard with an Athlon 64 X2 6400+ ( that's one honkin' cpu ! 3.2 ghz. ) . The Athlon 64 X2 cpus can't benefit from faster than 800mhz / PC6400 DDR2 ram, but Phenoms surely DO benefit from 1066mhz DDR2 ram, on AM2+ and above mboards, and that boosts the fsb speed.
The memory controller is built into the cpu for both types of cpus, it's not in the mboard's main chipset.


Report •

#6
February 17, 2010 at 21:21:00
AMD abandoned the FSB in favor of the HyperTransport bus back in 2003 with the introduction of the S754 platform. All AMD CPUs since then run at a base frequency of 200MHz. The HyperTransport bus is the product of the CPU frequency & the HT multiplier. And like DDR RAM, the HT bus can be reported as either the actual speed, 2000MHz for example, or the theoretical speed, which would be 4000MHz. The theoretical HT bus speed is often listed as MT/s (MegaTransfers per second) rather than MHz.

What I'm getting at is you're comparing actual bus speed to theoretical bus speed. The processor supports 4000MHz aka 4000 MT/s aka 2000MHz (actual)...the board supports 2600MHz (actual) aka 5200MHz aka 5200 MT/s. Make sure to compare "apples to apples".

http://www.hypertransport.org/

BTW, Intel's new line of CPUs has the memory controller integrated into the CPU therefore they no longer use a FSB either. The new bus is called QuickPath Interconnect (QPI).

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Intel_...


Report •

#7
February 17, 2010 at 23:02:49
thanks for the info jam it was useful

Report •

#8
February 17, 2010 at 23:21:35
The only production processors that will still use a FSB method is the Intel Atom. Even the new Atoms N4xxx/ N5xxx still uses a FSB.

Iron Sharpens Iron.


Report •

Ask Question