Solved BSOD when installing gfx card

July 11, 2011 at 06:52:30
Specs: Windows 7
Hi I have a computer that I tried to update to windows 7, when installing it bsod when completing installation, I have narrowed it down to the AGP card or slot, when I install the drivers for any card it bsod after I try to restart after the install, I have no pci card to try and there is no onboard either.is my board dead or can there be another solution?
Thanks

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✔ Best Answer
July 12, 2011 at 08:42:06
When you search the web with: STOP: 0x0000008E

you will find lots of "hits" and lots of possible causes.

Searching the web with something such as: STOP: 0x0000008E after installing video drivers
might find something that is more appropriate.
.....

I'm assuming you HAVE NOT installed any anti-malware software yet.
If you HAVE.....

NOTE that sometimes the resident module(s) of anti-malware programs - a part that runs all the time scanning for suspicious activity - will interfere with the proper installation of third party software, the software will not install properly, and you may get no indication of that at all while installing the software.
To avoid that possibilty, you should always DISABLE the resident module(s) of anti-malware programs, BEFORE you install third party software (software other than most Microsoft Updates, etc., that did not come with Windows ), especially when it's a major or complicated software package.

E.g. if you are using the free or paid version of AVG, you should disable the Resident Shield in AVG's settings in Windows.

If you don't know how to do that, tell us which anti-malware software you are using.
When you are sure the software has installed correctly, re-enable the resident module(s).

NOTE that Microsoft's Security Essentials anti-malware software MAY be built into your Windows 7 installation. If it is, it's listed in your All Programs list. It's resident module doesn't interfere with the proper installation of MOST third party software, but it MIGHT.

Scroll down - it shows where you can enable / disable Real time protection:
http://www.microsoft.com/security/p...
.......

Probably the most frequent cause of this error is a ram problem, and in that case you may not get the error in some circumstances, but you DO get it in other circumstances.

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...
.....

Some ram manufacturer's modules do not strictly adhere to the JEDEC standards that most mboards bioses use to determine ram settings.
In that case, the ram settings in the bios Setup that the bios has automatically chosen may not be correct.
Check the ram settings in your bios - the ram voltage, and the ram timing numbers - those should be the same as for the specs for the modules themselves. Often the ram voltage and timing numbers are printed on the label on the modules.

If the voltage setting or timings settings in the bios are different from the specs for the ram, change them in the bios. The timing numbers must be as close as you can get to the same, or slower timings (higher numbers = slower) - you won't notice the difference the slower settings make.

If you have a mix of different modules
- don't mix ram that different voltages are specified for - the bios will force the ram to use the lowest voltage, if "by spd" or similar is used (default settings) - ram that a higher voltage is specified for is more likely to not work properly in that situation.
- the bios settings must be those for the slowest timing settings of all the modules, or slower (higher numbers = slower).

You MAY be able to custom set the ram voltage to the higher ram voltage in the bios if you do NOT have the bios set to detect the ram "by SPD" or similar, however, you must NOT exceed the max voltage range for the modules that require a lower voltage, and that can be hard to determine, unless you can find detailed specs - e.g. if the ram is Kingston ram that doesn't have a brand name system specific part number, that info is easily found.
.......

NOTE that I / we have seen that the ram can pass bootable ram diagnostics tests when those settings in the bios are NOT correct ( usually, when one or more ram timing number(s) is(are) too low) - it's only when you use the operating system that you experience problems because of that.
When that applies, you usually do not have problems in some circumstances, but you DO experience errors or problems you can't find a cause for in other circumstances.
........

When you have determined the ram settings in the bios are okay, and you have re-seated the modules...

Test your ram with a ram diagnostics set of tests.

E.g. Use memtest86, or memtest86+ (different author), or if you have 4gb or less installed, Microsoft's
Windows Memory Diagnostic:
http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag...
It can be toggled (press T) to do a standard or a more comprehensive set of tests - use the default 6 test one first - if it passes one pass of that, use the latter one. A few of the tests in the latter set are intentionally slower.

memtest86 has bugs that cause false errors to be reported in one or two tests of the default full set of tests for SOME mboards that have an AMD cpu or AMD main chipset. One of them reports infinite errors and never finishes running.

memtest86+ has bugs that causes false errors to be reported for SOME mboards, unless you DISABLE Legacy USB or USB Keyboard or similar in the bios Setup BEFORE you run it.

I've had no false error problems when I've used the Windows Memory Diagnostic.

......





#1
July 11, 2011 at 07:16:21
You need to post the make/model of your motherboard, make/model of your video card, & which graphics driver you're attempting to install.

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#2
July 11, 2011 at 07:20:35
Motherboard model is MS-6533 as for make and model of graphics card its is any card I try, all AGP cards , all drivers including the default drivers that come with windows. I have tried 4 different cards and they all do the same.

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#3
July 11, 2011 at 09:39:28
Not a good motherboard. Are you uninstalling all these video drivers so that they don't conflict with each other? Are you sure the cards you're attempting to use are supported? Do you have the latest SiS chipset drivers installed? Did you enter the BIOS & disable the onboard video?

http://www.msi.com/product/mb/MS-65...

http://w3.sis.com/download/agreemen...


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Related Solutions

#4
July 11, 2011 at 13:14:51
Quote the STOP: 0Xx00000xx code you're getting .

What (max combined output) wattage capacity does your power supply have ?
What make and model ?

Which video chipsets are on the AGP cards you tried ?

If the video chipset on the card was first released before about 1999, some of those cannot be used on a mboard that has onboard video unless the mboard has a jumper on it you can move to disable the onboard video. (I haven't seen any mboard that has that since the early Pentium mboards.)

Do the AGP cards work fine BEFORE you have installed specific drivers for them in Windows (it sounds like they do) ?

There are three series of MS-6533 - at least one of them has onboard video -if your model has onboard video, does that and the mboard work fine when you have installed specific drivers for it in Windows when there's no AGP card installed ?
.......

MSI mboards are well known to be more likely to have this problem than most brands...

Some mboards develop this problem - electrolytic capacitors were installed on them that were not properly made, and they fail eventually - the mboard manufacturer didn't know they were improperly made at the time the mboard was made.

Open up your case and examine the mboard to see if you have bad capacitors, and/or other findable signs of mboard damage .

What to look for, mboard symptoms, example pictures:
http://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5
Home page that site
- what the problem is caused by
- he says there are STILL bad capacitors on more recent mboards.
http://www.badcaps.net/

Pictures of blown capacitors, other components, power supplies, fried Athlon cpus, etc.:
http://www.halfdone.com/Personal/Jo...
.........

If you see no evidence of failing or failed capacitors, or other mboard damage.....

The circuits of an AGP slot or an AGP card are easily damaged if you or anyone has ever plugged in or unplugged an AGP card , or if the card was ever not fastened down and rode up in it's slot, when the power supply has live AC power to it.
The ATX PS is always powering the ATX family mboard in some places, including some of the contacts in the AGP slot, even when the computer is not running, as long as the PS is receiving live AC power, and AGP cards and AGP slots are especially easily damaged because they have two vertical levels of staggered contacts.

I have seen, and we have seen in Topics on this site, that sometimes the dedicated video slot's or video card's circuits have been damaged such that video card works fine in plain VGA mode while booting and in Windows before the specific drivers for the video chipset have been loaded in Windows, and in Windows Safe mode, or VGA mode, but the video card does NOT work fine when the specific drivers for the video chipset have been loaded in Windows when you boot normally..
If that applies to your case, since you have tried several AGP cards, the AGP slot's circuits are probably damaged. If your mboard model does not have onboard video, a PCI video card will probably work fine.


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#5
July 12, 2011 at 00:04:59
Thanks for the reply
Are you uninstalling all these video drivers so that they don't conflict with each other - yes

Are you sure the cards you're attempting to use are supported - yes

Do you have the latest SiS chipset drivers installed - yes

Did you enter the BIOS & disable the onboard video - Didnt see the option to do this.


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#6
July 12, 2011 at 00:20:57
Hey thanks for the replys guys,
The stop is 0x0000008E
The psu is 250W but I have tried it on a 500W as I thought this might be the problem and still not worked.
I dont see any onboard output unless its anything other than the standard outputs.
Yes the cards all work before the drivers are installed.
I dont see any blown anything although I dont know about the AGP slot itsself.

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#7
July 12, 2011 at 07:42:41
"Did you enter the BIOS & disable the onboard video - Didnt see the option to do this."

Installing an AGP card disables the onboard video automatically, installing a PCI video card does not, when the mboard has onboard video.

There is no bios setting that can actually disable the onboard video when the mboard has an AGP slot and onboard video. There is a setting for Primary Video or Intialize Video First or similar, but that only informs Windows about the type of video adapter the computer is using.


Report •

#8
July 12, 2011 at 08:42:06
✔ Best Answer
When you search the web with: STOP: 0x0000008E

you will find lots of "hits" and lots of possible causes.

Searching the web with something such as: STOP: 0x0000008E after installing video drivers
might find something that is more appropriate.
.....

I'm assuming you HAVE NOT installed any anti-malware software yet.
If you HAVE.....

NOTE that sometimes the resident module(s) of anti-malware programs - a part that runs all the time scanning for suspicious activity - will interfere with the proper installation of third party software, the software will not install properly, and you may get no indication of that at all while installing the software.
To avoid that possibilty, you should always DISABLE the resident module(s) of anti-malware programs, BEFORE you install third party software (software other than most Microsoft Updates, etc., that did not come with Windows ), especially when it's a major or complicated software package.

E.g. if you are using the free or paid version of AVG, you should disable the Resident Shield in AVG's settings in Windows.

If you don't know how to do that, tell us which anti-malware software you are using.
When you are sure the software has installed correctly, re-enable the resident module(s).

NOTE that Microsoft's Security Essentials anti-malware software MAY be built into your Windows 7 installation. If it is, it's listed in your All Programs list. It's resident module doesn't interfere with the proper installation of MOST third party software, but it MIGHT.

Scroll down - it shows where you can enable / disable Real time protection:
http://www.microsoft.com/security/p...
.......

Probably the most frequent cause of this error is a ram problem, and in that case you may not get the error in some circumstances, but you DO get it in other circumstances.

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...
.....

Some ram manufacturer's modules do not strictly adhere to the JEDEC standards that most mboards bioses use to determine ram settings.
In that case, the ram settings in the bios Setup that the bios has automatically chosen may not be correct.
Check the ram settings in your bios - the ram voltage, and the ram timing numbers - those should be the same as for the specs for the modules themselves. Often the ram voltage and timing numbers are printed on the label on the modules.

If the voltage setting or timings settings in the bios are different from the specs for the ram, change them in the bios. The timing numbers must be as close as you can get to the same, or slower timings (higher numbers = slower) - you won't notice the difference the slower settings make.

If you have a mix of different modules
- don't mix ram that different voltages are specified for - the bios will force the ram to use the lowest voltage, if "by spd" or similar is used (default settings) - ram that a higher voltage is specified for is more likely to not work properly in that situation.
- the bios settings must be those for the slowest timing settings of all the modules, or slower (higher numbers = slower).

You MAY be able to custom set the ram voltage to the higher ram voltage in the bios if you do NOT have the bios set to detect the ram "by SPD" or similar, however, you must NOT exceed the max voltage range for the modules that require a lower voltage, and that can be hard to determine, unless you can find detailed specs - e.g. if the ram is Kingston ram that doesn't have a brand name system specific part number, that info is easily found.
.......

NOTE that I / we have seen that the ram can pass bootable ram diagnostics tests when those settings in the bios are NOT correct ( usually, when one or more ram timing number(s) is(are) too low) - it's only when you use the operating system that you experience problems because of that.
When that applies, you usually do not have problems in some circumstances, but you DO experience errors or problems you can't find a cause for in other circumstances.
........

When you have determined the ram settings in the bios are okay, and you have re-seated the modules...

Test your ram with a ram diagnostics set of tests.

E.g. Use memtest86, or memtest86+ (different author), or if you have 4gb or less installed, Microsoft's
Windows Memory Diagnostic:
http://oca.microsoft.com/en/windiag...
It can be toggled (press T) to do a standard or a more comprehensive set of tests - use the default 6 test one first - if it passes one pass of that, use the latter one. A few of the tests in the latter set are intentionally slower.

memtest86 has bugs that cause false errors to be reported in one or two tests of the default full set of tests for SOME mboards that have an AMD cpu or AMD main chipset. One of them reports infinite errors and never finishes running.

memtest86+ has bugs that causes false errors to be reported for SOME mboards, unless you DISABLE Legacy USB or USB Keyboard or similar in the bios Setup BEFORE you run it.

I've had no false error problems when I've used the Windows Memory Diagnostic.

......




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