Solved Bottleneck for a EVGA GTX 1070 SC ACX 3.0 in PCI-E 2.0 slot

September 7, 2017 at 19:49:23
Specs: Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit, Intel Core i7 @ 3.9GHz | 16GB DDR3 2400MHz
Hey there,

I'm looking at some used motherboards to hold over my current build and enable overclocking until I can afford to upgrade the processor, motherboard, and RAM all at once, and was just wondering if there would be any bottleneck for my EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 SC ACX 3.0 going from a PCI-E 3.0-compliant expansion slot on my MSI B75MA-P45 to a PCI-E 2.0-compliant expansion slot on a GIGABYTE Z68MA-D2H-B3.

I remember reading some time ago that most PCI-E 3.0 video cards didn't see any bottleneck in PCI-E 2.1 slots, but wasn't sure if that still applied to current cards since it has been some time since I read that.

My only real reason for replacing my current MSI board is due to the P45 chipset not supporting overclocking beyond the boost frequency, so a P67, Z68, or Z77 board would be a temporary replacement to allow overclocking until I do a full upgrade.

Thanks in advance.

MSI B75MA-P45
Intel Core i7-3770K 3.9GHz
Corsair H115i CPU cooler
16GB DDR3 2400MHz
EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 8GB
Samsung 840 EVO 120GB SSD (Windows 7 Ultimate)
Toshiba 2TB


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✔ Best Answer
September 13, 2017 at 21:11:44
This makes sense to me. Keep it as it is and when it is not fast enough, getting old, or just ready for a fresh start, build a new one from scratch. When you try to use parts of an older system to save money you usually make unintelligent compromises that are necessary but do not yield the best system and one that will be out dated that much sooner. It is in my opinion almost always better to hold off, save, and do it right.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
September 8, 2017 at 13:48:55
Your system is fine as-is. You'd be wasting your money for a minor increase in performance.

"When you limit your overclock of a chip like the Core i7-3770K to 4.2 or 4.3 GHz, you’re completely on the safe side. There is no temperature issue, and performance remains impressive. Then again, such a system won’t be significantly faster than a machine running at its stock clocks."

http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...


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#2
September 12, 2017 at 04:20:32
gonna ask you something off topic...

Why do you have an expensive cpu cooler, but have not overclocked your cpu?
I'm fairly certain you can get it to 4.5 ghz at 1.35 vcore without trouble nor temp issues

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBT...

guide: http://www.overclock.net/t/1247413/...

I mean its free +10% preformance

Simple solutions are often the best

message edited by hidde663


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#3
September 12, 2017 at 21:39:08
If you must upgrade from a B75 MB then you have to go with a Z77 MB which all should support PCIe 3.0 as well. I cannot fathom anyone purchasing a K series CPU and Not purchase the appropriate Z series MB to go with it. Without the correct chipset you cannot properly OC it if that was your original intention. Otherwise why spend for the K series in the first place. Remember OC'ing is a step by step process and all silicons are different. Just because one person gets a particular OC does not mean you will also and even copying exact settings does not mean the exact results. Yours may run at that speed but only on a different VCore which if it needs to be higher for stability will also mean higher temps.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#4
September 13, 2017 at 17:24:32
Apologies for the delay in responding- always busy this month.

@riider

The change in performance may not be that big of a difference, yet I have a sufficient cooler and sourced a fairly cheap board, so the possibility of overclocking at a decent price for a replacement for my P45 prompted this question. Regardless, I've decided against replacing the board for now until I can find a decent Z77 board.

@hidde663

My current motherboard's chipset does not support overclocking beyond the turbo frequency, hence my want to replace it with a board with a chipset capable of overclocking.

@Fingers

This board was originally configured for an i3-2100, and I purchased the 3770K used last year for a great deal as a straight upgrade over the i3. I originally intended to replace the B75 board right away, but Z77 1155 boards are getting hard to find at a decent price.

Anyways, I've decided to forego the replacement of my current board for now until I can either source a Z77 board or replace the processor, RAM, and MB with a more current configuration.

MSI B75MA-P45
Intel Core i7-3770K 3.9GHz
Corsair H115i CPU cooler
16GB DDR3 2400MHz
EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 8GB
Samsung 840 EVO 120GB SSD (Windows 7 Ultimate)
Toshiba 2TB

message edited by Comguy


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#5
September 13, 2017 at 21:11:44
✔ Best Answer
This makes sense to me. Keep it as it is and when it is not fast enough, getting old, or just ready for a fresh start, build a new one from scratch. When you try to use parts of an older system to save money you usually make unintelligent compromises that are necessary but do not yield the best system and one that will be out dated that much sooner. It is in my opinion almost always better to hold off, save, and do it right.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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