Boot Up Issues

July 31, 2010 at 10:10:28
Specs: XP Pro SP3
After installing a second external DVD RW drive to my OS, upon the command of asking me to please restart the computer in order for the changes to take effect; by computer stopped responding upon reboot. Keep in mind, I already have an internal DVD/CD combo drive, and another external DVD/CD RW drive installed; the reason being; I conduct a business uploading, editing, converting, different formats of movies and transfer them to DVDs and have to make copies, etc. On this particular day I was being rushed for time and needed more copies and was going to attempt to transfer from DVD to DVD instead of tranferring DVD to my HDD. I'm curious if the crash was due to power overload, conflict of hardware, or possible virus of software since this latest external drive was given to be by a third party. My error msg. reads 'Boots from CD Failure....' x 3; then will read DISK BOOT FAILURE INSERT SYSTEM DISK AND PRESS ENTER; I have attempted F8 to start up in safe mode to uninstall the software, it will not allow, I only hear continuous 'beeps'; I inserted the XP disc, which at first it stated it could not read, so I went into the BIOS and changed the sequence for the CDROM to read 1st, it acted like it read it, but when it came time for me to press any key it went back to the boot up screen and went to the same error msg? Now it's stating along with this error msg, on boot up screen 'secondary IDE channel no 80 conductor cable installed'.....any ideas would be greatly appreciated!

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#1
July 31, 2010 at 17:01:41
The external drive has some requirements that must be met.
The following applies to external hard drives, but the same things apply to external optical drives, and to drives connected via a firewire connection.

Troubleshooting USB device problems including for flash drives, external drives, memory cards.
See Response 1:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...

Check that out first.
......

Rarely, not all the ports on the back of a desktop case may be able to supply 500ma each.

If you have a desktop computer, Note that I answered a Topic on this site recently where a guy had an external drive, which does require the full 500ma, connected to a port on the back of a desktop case - it would not work properly when a webcam was in the port next to it, but it worked fine when the webcam was unplugged. Ports on the back of a desktop case often have two ports connected to the same USB controller module that are ports one above the other - you could try connecting the cable to one of those and leaving the other un-used.
......

"I only hear continuous 'beeps';..."

For an Award bios or a bios based on one, a pattern of beeps that indicate no ram is installed, or a ram problem, is often a beep of about a half second, silence for a half second, a beep of about a half second, silence for a half second, continuously.


If that's what you're hearing.....

See response 2 in this - try cleaning the contacts on the ram modules, and making sure the modules are properly seated:
http://www.computing.net/hardware/w...

For a laptop, or netbook, you must remove both its main battery and AC adapter before you do that.

For a brand name computer, see the Owner's or User's manual if you need to - how to remove or replace the ram is usually in that - it may already be in your installed programs. If you can't get into Windows, it may be on a disk that came with the computer, or you can go online and look at it or download it - it's in the downloads for your specific model.

For a generic desktop computer, see the mboard manual if you need to - how to remove or replace the ram is usually in that.
........

" I went into the BIOS and changed the sequence for the CDROM to read 1st,"

It does not necessarily have to be listed first - it just has to be listed before any hard drive or SCSI.

When you have more than one optical drive connected, many bioses will only boot a bootable disk from one of them. In that case,
- try the disk in another optical drive if the drive can read the disk

- or - find
- the list of optical drives. It's often near the Boot Order or similar settings - make the optical drive you want to boot a bootable disk from the first one in the list

- or - less often, sometimes there is no optical drive list, but there is more that one optical drive listed in the Boot Order or similar settings - make the optical drive you want to boot from the first one in the list

- in either case, Save bios settings.
.........

When you have more than one hard drive connected, the bios will only attempt to boot from the first bootable hard drive it detects, or the first hard drive it is custom set to detect first. It WILL NOT attempt to boot from other hard drives if the first one in not bootable.

I know from experience that DOES NOT have to be correct when you boot from a Windows CD and install Windows on a drive - Setup will work fine - it's only after Setup has completed that the wrong boot setting rears it's effect.
No bootable device found, or no operating system found, or similar .

If you have more than one internal hard drive connected, go into the bios Setup and find
- the list of hard drives. It's often near the Boot Order or similar settings - make the hard drive you want to boot from the first one in the list

- or - less often, sometimes there is no hard drive list, but there is more that one hard drive listed in the Boot Order or similar settings - make the hard drive you want to boot from the first one in the list

- in either case, Save bios settings.
.......

"'secondary IDE channel no 80 conductor cable installed'.."

Were fiddling with IDE data cables inside the case ?

Some bioses will generate a message like that

- if a hard drive that supports UDMA 66 or higher is connected to a 40 wire IDE data cable

- if an optical drive that supports UDMA 66 is connected to a 40 wire IDE data cable

- if there's something wrong with an 80 wire data cable that such a drive that's connected to .

IDE hard drives made after about 1999 are UDMA 66, UDMA 100, or UDMA133 .

IDE DVD combo burner drives - that can burn and read both CDs and DVDs - that have a DVD-R and DVD-R burn rating of 16X or greater must use an 80 wire data cable in order to be able to achieve their rated max specs. Slower DVD burner drives and all CD only drives will work fine with a 40 wire data cable if by themselves on a data cable, or if on a data cable with another drive that does not require an 80 wire cable.

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittent, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.

80 wire data cables must have the proper end connector connected to the mboard or controller card IDE header - usually that's blue, but in any case, it's the one farther from the middle connector on a 3 connector data cable.



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