Boot from onboard disk controller, not PCI

January 6, 2011 at 09:00:18
Specs: Microsoft Windows Server 2003 SP2, 850 MHz / 576 MB
Hi,
I've got an old PC (Soyo motherboard) I need to rebuild with an onboard ATA RAID controller. I've also got a couple Silicon Image SATA controllers (1 RAID, the other not) that I want to use. Without the cards installed, I can boot the OS just fine. When I install the controller cards, it looks to those drives for an OS first, and not finding an OS, I get the "Insert system disk" message. I've changed the boot order countless times, as well as disk detection order, and nothing seems to change the behavior. It's not a deal breaker installing the OS onto a drive on the PCI controller card; I just wanted to use the drive and OS that is already there and "working".

mobo: Soyo SY-6BA+100 (Award v.4.51PG, 07/11/2000-i440BX-ITE867-2A69KS2IC-00)
onboard controller: HighPoint HPT370 UDMA/ATA100 RAID Controller (BIOS ver. 1.0.4b)
PCI controller: SiL3512A SATALink (BIOS ver 4.3.79)
PCI controller: SiL3124 SATARaid (BIOS ver. 6.4.09)

When your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.


See More: Boot from onboard disk controller, not PCI

Report •


#1
January 6, 2011 at 10:18:36
"I've changed the boot order countless times". Does that mean the settings are not holding?

Describe how you have the boot order set?


Report •

#2
January 6, 2011 at 10:33:24
Thanks for the reply -

To me, the settings seem to have no effect at all.

The Award BIOS version I have gives me these choices for Boot Sequence:
A, C, SCSI
C, A, SCSI
C, CDROM, A
CDROM, C, A
D, A, SCSI
E, A, SCSI
F, A, SCSI
SCSI, A, C
SCSI, C, A
C only and
ZIP100, C

I also have the choice of ATA/100 & SCSI Boot Order:
ATA, SCSI
SCSI, ATA

I've tried the following, which seemed to be the only logical choices:
"C only" with ATA, SCSI
"C only" with SCSI, ATA
"SCSI, C, A" with ATA, SCSI and
"SCSI, C, A" with SCSI, ATA

When your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.


Report •

#3
January 6, 2011 at 13:37:21
When you installed the OS you did see the drives?

When you boot can you see the sil bios?

It would be scsi, something, something (usually) and boot scsi.

Not all systems support booting from add on cards. You may have some conflict with your onboard. Might look for an update to bios if it exactly says some deal for add on cards. Your system may not support the cheap SIL card. It would have supported older hardware arrays I'd think.

Also you may be able to put a small partition with only boot stuff on an ide and then put all data on the array.

And you will have to have the drivers slipstreamed into the install media or add on by floppy.

Why did it take me over a year to phone in a problem to ATT?


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
January 6, 2011 at 19:31:47
The ATA/SCSI should be on ATA as that enables the on-board ATA controller.

The cards have their own bios' and aren't affected by the boot order. The PC's bios hands off to the card bios before the PC gets to its own boot process. Then with no drive found on the card it should go back to the PC's bios. I'm not sure why it's not doing that. Did any setup instructions come with the cards?

Also, have you tried the cards in different PCI slots?

Real men don't use AntiVirus; they just reformat


Report •

#5
January 7, 2011 at 06:44:33
Thanks for the replies!

"When you installed the OS you did see the drives?"

No. When building the box, I started with only the onboard ATA controller with no
other cards installed. The drive already had an OS installed. I then added a second
drive to the ATA controller. The OS booted and found that drive with no issues. I
have a stack of old drives (some ATA, some SATA) that I'd like to backup and
re-purpose what I can. It was after shutting down and adding the SATA controller(s)
and drives that the BOOT drive was not found.

"When you boot can you see the sil bios?"

Yes, the SiL BIOS messages display after POST. I can enter CTRL-S to access
those BIOS menus, but they don't reflect any type of priority settings.

"It would be scsi, something, something (usually) and boot scsi.
Not all systems support booting from add on cards. You may have some conflict 
with your onboard. Might look for an update to bios if it exactly says some deal 
for add on cards. Your system may not support the cheap SIL card. It would have 
supported older hardware arrays I'd think. Also you may be able to put a small 
partition with only boot stuff on an ide and then put all data on the array. And 
you will have to have the drivers slipstreamed into the install media or add on 
by floppy."

Yeah, I don't actually want to boot from the array offered by the SiL cards; I do
however want to boot from the onboard ATA array.

"The ATA/SCSI should be on ATA as that enables the on-board ATA controller."

The ATA/SCSI effects which controller(s) are detected first, and seems to be the
only thing that works as expect. In other words, when ATA, SCSI is selected,
the following is displayed:

Award v.4.51PG, 07/11/2000-i440BX-ITE867-2A69KS2IC-00
<POST messages>
HighPoint HPT370 UDMA/ATA100 RAID Controller BIOS ver. 1.0.4b
<lists drives detected>
SiL3512A SATALink BIOS ver 4.3.79
<lists drives detected>
SiL3124 SATARaid BIOS ver. 6.4.09
<lists drives detected>

When SCSI, ATA is selected, this is displayed:

Award v.4.51PG, 07/11/2000-i440BX-ITE867-2A69KS2IC-00
<POST messages>
SiL3512A SATALink BIOS ver 4.3.79
<lists drives detected>
SiL3124 SATARaid BIOS ver. 6.4.09
<lists drives detected>
HighPoint HPT370 UDMA/ATA100 RAID Controller BIOS ver. 1.0.4b
<lists drives detected>

Changing the order of (controller) detection doesn't effect the boot process as
far as which disk to boot from. :-/

"The cards have their own bios' and aren't affected by the boot order. The PC's 
bios hands off to the card bios before the PC gets to its own boot process. Then 
with no drive found on the card it should go back to the PC's bios. I'm not sure 
why it's not doing that. Did any setup instructions come with the cards?"

Just the typical install instructions:
1. Turn off system.
2. Remove the cover of your system.
3. Remove the inside slot cover of an available PCI or PCI-X slot on the motherboard.
4. Install the SV-HBA card into the open PCI or PCI-X slot. Secure the bracket to the
system's frame.
5. Attach the Serial ATA cables to the external or internal ports on the card.
6. Fasten the controller card bracket to the system case.

"Also, have you tried the cards in different PCI slots?"

Indeed I have. IIRC, the Award BIOS can assign IRQ preference to each PCI slot.
I may revisit that menu, as I believe I allowed the BIOS to assign IRQs automatically.

I should update the original post to reflect that I actually have 4 controllers,
2 onboard, and the 2 cards. The motherboard has both standard IDE and the
HighPoint ATA controllers.

When your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.


Report •

#6
January 7, 2011 at 17:32:58
How does it work when only one card is used? Maybe they're interfering with each other. Are there any minimum hardware/cpu/motherboard requirements for the cards? (Doesn't seem necessary since they have their own bios' but something to check anyway.)

Real men don't use AntiVirus; they just reformat


Report •

#7
January 8, 2011 at 08:48:39
I'm pretty methodical, and only added one card at a time. At this point, I'm going to install an OS onto an IDE drive, and see how that goes. I'll add in an ATA drive, and see how that goes, then add in SATA if all goes well. If it still insists on SATA as being the primary boot device, I'll utilize the SiL 3512 since it doesn't offer a RAID solution, and have a spare SATA drive with an OS on it that I can boot from, when the original boot drive ever crashes. :-P

Thanks for the help!

When your only tool is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.


Report •

Ask Question