Solved BIOS setup freezes (yet Windows will boot)

December 20, 2013 at 10:28:06
Specs: Windows 7, C2D 4400 w/ 3GB DDR2-5300
My PC (Asus P5LD2, C2D 4400, 3GB, Win7 32bits) freezes upon entering the BIOS setup: no keyboard input is registered en the system clock freezes. A hard reset is then required.

Yet, Windows will startup fine if one does not enter the BIOS setup.

I've tested the CMOS battery on two multimeters and it is good (delivers 3 volts). I have also removed the battery for a couple of minutes and reset the CMOS (using the motherboard's jumper). Also, I have flashed the BIOS using the Asus update utility for Windows. None of these actions have helped.

What could causing my BIOS setup to freeze? What can I try next?


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✔ Best Answer
December 22, 2013 at 20:53:38
Agreed, for a short while the power supply apparently was putting out more than it was designed for but it could not keep that up for long. Now it cannot. Your best bet is to purchase a good quality power supply with 450W - 500W overall, but more important is in the details. It should have a single high amperage 12Volt rail, Active PFC, 80% or greater certified efficiency, and be made by a quality name brand. It also should have a 3-5year warranty since that is the way you know the company is confident with their product. You should be getting 35A to 45A approximately on the 12V rail so that you will be able to even upgrade a little higher if you eventually want to down the road.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.



#1
December 20, 2013 at 10:31:35
What type of keyboard are you using? If you are not using a PS/2 type then try one.

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#2
December 20, 2013 at 11:18:23
Thanks you for your reply.

I have unplugged all USB devices, replaced the USB keyboard by a PS/2 one. Then I disconnected harddrive and CD/DVD drive. I even removed and swapped memory modules. The only card in the PC is the videocard (no on board graphics in this model) and this one I did not remove.

With all these 'options' the BIOS setup still hangs. What can I try next?


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#3
December 20, 2013 at 11:27:56
It may be time for a BIOS update to the latest one available for your version of the board.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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Related Solutions

#4
December 20, 2013 at 12:43:02
When you cleared the CMOS as mentioned above, did you have the computer unplugged at the time?

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#5
December 20, 2013 at 13:16:36
Did you measure the 3V battery on load somehow? If not then the 3V could be totally misleading. Without a load many a dying battery (of any type) can read fine, put it on load and the voltage falls right off.

If it's the coin type best just replace it - they are cheap and easy to fit. That will eliminate it from the equation.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
December 20, 2013 at 23:17:47
I think you should try the cmos reset again. Remove the power cord as OtheHill mentioned. You don't need to remove the battery. Just locate the 'clear cmos' jumper and move it from its standby position to 'clear' for a few seconds and then back to standby.

When you next start it up you'll usually get a message about needing to configure the bios settings. Enter setup again and see if the problem persists.

message edited by DAVEINCAPS


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#7
December 21, 2013 at 05:06:41
Hi and thank you all.

I have tried all your suggestions above. Flashed to latest BIOS version (version 2002), cord unplugged, CMOS reset without removing the battery. I even got a new battery this morning. Nothing helped.

One thing I can think of: I replaced the videocard (ATI HD5450) by a faster one (ATI HD7750). I did some research and my 350W PSU /w 23 amps on the 12v rail should be sufficient. And'the PC has worked finein this configuration for about a month. And I could enter the BIOS setup without any problems.

Today I put the old videocard back. And I could enter the BIOS again. So... is my system underpowered? Why then did it run fine for weeks? Or could the cause be something else?


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#8
December 21, 2013 at 07:25:24
PS: I checked again, and my PSU should indeed be sufficient for an HD7750, according to the guys from RealHardTechX:
http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_...

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#9
December 21, 2013 at 07:59:36
Post the brand and full model number of the power supply.

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#10
December 21, 2013 at 15:16:19
Are there any video options in bios setup? Often there's a use onboard/use added card option there. Whatever it's set for, toggle it to the other and then try the new card again.

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#11
December 22, 2013 at 03:49:27
@daveincaps: thank you, there is no onboard graphics card and no option for it in the BIOS

@OtheHill: the PSU is an AOpen Z400-08FC
It delivers 350W continues, 400W peak, has 10.0A on 12v1 and 13.0A on 12v2

message edited by Bas71


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#12
December 22, 2013 at 11:34:48
The guys at Realhardtechx are wrong. See the link below from AMD for system requirements. 400W minimum. This means a good 400W PSU.

Second link below is to the specs of your power supply. It has 2 +12v rails. 10A@+12v, 13A@+12v. Too lean.

http://www.amd.com/us/products/desk...

http://global.aopen.com/products_de...


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#13
December 22, 2013 at 20:53:38
✔ Best Answer
Agreed, for a short while the power supply apparently was putting out more than it was designed for but it could not keep that up for long. Now it cannot. Your best bet is to purchase a good quality power supply with 450W - 500W overall, but more important is in the details. It should have a single high amperage 12Volt rail, Active PFC, 80% or greater certified efficiency, and be made by a quality name brand. It also should have a 3-5year warranty since that is the way you know the company is confident with their product. You should be getting 35A to 45A approximately on the 12V rail so that you will be able to even upgrade a little higher if you eventually want to down the road.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#14
December 23, 2013 at 01:50:31
OtheHill, Fingers, thanks.

I am also starting to have problems loading Windows at startup (two spontaneous reboots). That didn't happen before either. So indeed it seems like the PSU is 'overstretched' and can take no more.

I'm going to get a new PSU today. The PC is pretty old, so I am not looking for too much extra headroom for future upgrades.

The following PSU is relatively cheap (about $50) and has some great reviews: the Corsair CX430. With it 430Watts, 32A on 12v and an 80 PLUS Bronze certificate it should do the job easily.

And if I wrap it up nicely, it makes a nice gift under the Christmas-tree :-)

Everyone, thanks again and happy holidays.

message edited by Bas71


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#15
December 23, 2013 at 05:11:45
That is a good choice for a reasonably priced power supply an is highly recommended here by many. Let us know how it goes.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#16
December 23, 2013 at 10:35:17
The old AOpen PSU has been replaced by the CX430. I have been testing it for a couple of hours now and all seems well! The new PSU is also noticeably more quiet.

Wishing you an error-free 2014!


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