Solved Battery Voltage and Adapter Voltage don't match

June 22, 2018 at 16:56:28
Specs: Windows 7
I'm looking to replace my battery and power adapter for my laptop. I've read that you want to match the voltage of the power adapter to that of the battery and the amperage should match or exceed. My current battery however is 10.8V, 5.2A and my power adapter says 19v, 6.32A and I received it like this directly from Asus. My battery actually doesnt hold a charge anymore (which doesn't matter to me since I keep it plugged in all the time anyway), and I have an exposed wire on my adapter now, hence why I just want to replace both. Should I match the battery and adapter voltage/amperage as closely as I could to what I have now despite the large voltage disparity? I'm having trouble finding lower voltage adapters for my laptop. I haven't had any problems with my laptop for the 7 years I've had it other than poor battery life. I just don't want to damage my laptop

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✔ Best Answer
June 23, 2018 at 03:00:33
Amazon will have numerous compatible batteries and mains adapters/chargers, as likely will Egghead, and many other sources on the web. Look for your specific Asus model in the list of compatible batteries and/or chargers/adapters and read any reviews carefully. Don’t buy the cheapest just because it’s the cheapest; note end user comments carefully.

Voltage on charger/adapter will be higher than the actual battery volts (as already advised/explained by the chaps above). Current delivered by the adapter must not be below that of your current and Asus spec’d adapter; but it can be hgher (within reason).

One item to be aware of is the tip diameter of the plug on the cable whch plugs into the
laptop. These vary enormously and not uncommon to find an alleged multi compatible charger doesn’t have the corrct diameter tip. The one you have now will be a snugly fitting laptop end plug, and any replacement charger plug end must be likewise. So search for the exact model as given on your current charger, also (as suggested by the chaps above) check with Asus re’ the exact model you require. Then go hunting... When you receive the new charger/adapter check carefully both its voltage and current ratings - and the fit of the plug into the laptop. If the plug is loose... or won’t even go in... send the charger/adaper back for refund or a replacement unit with the correct diameter laptop end plug.

I mention the plug issue because I know of at least two cases where an adapter sold as a fully Acer compatible replacment - wasn’t! The internal tip diameter was too large and the owner of one was jamming the plug to one side in order to make/retain a conact... He did replace the adapter with a truly compatible one needless to say..



#1
June 22, 2018 at 17:26:01
There should be a label somewhere on the laptop listing the voltage & amperage for the AC adapter. You can also check the ASUS site: https://www.asus.com/us/support/

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#2
June 22, 2018 at 19:51:19
The adapter voltage is OK. My older HP laptop has about the same (original) battery/charger ratings.
The battery charger-circuit will regulate the voltage for the battery. Nothing to worry about.

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#3
June 22, 2018 at 19:51:33
The voltage on the adaptor is always going to be higher. 99.9% of laptops these days use 19 volts as the standard. If you got it from ASUS, then you will be fine.

Battery voltage and current output do not determine what the voltage and current rating of the power supply will be. Under load, the voltage will drop slightly anyway and they go overvoltage to allow for this and also it gives some extra headroom for voltage regulation.


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Related Solutions

#4
June 23, 2018 at 03:00:33
✔ Best Answer
Amazon will have numerous compatible batteries and mains adapters/chargers, as likely will Egghead, and many other sources on the web. Look for your specific Asus model in the list of compatible batteries and/or chargers/adapters and read any reviews carefully. Don’t buy the cheapest just because it’s the cheapest; note end user comments carefully.

Voltage on charger/adapter will be higher than the actual battery volts (as already advised/explained by the chaps above). Current delivered by the adapter must not be below that of your current and Asus spec’d adapter; but it can be hgher (within reason).

One item to be aware of is the tip diameter of the plug on the cable whch plugs into the
laptop. These vary enormously and not uncommon to find an alleged multi compatible charger doesn’t have the corrct diameter tip. The one you have now will be a snugly fitting laptop end plug, and any replacement charger plug end must be likewise. So search for the exact model as given on your current charger, also (as suggested by the chaps above) check with Asus re’ the exact model you require. Then go hunting... When you receive the new charger/adapter check carefully both its voltage and current ratings - and the fit of the plug into the laptop. If the plug is loose... or won’t even go in... send the charger/adaper back for refund or a replacement unit with the correct diameter laptop end plug.

I mention the plug issue because I know of at least two cases where an adapter sold as a fully Acer compatible replacment - wasn’t! The internal tip diameter was too large and the owner of one was jamming the plug to one side in order to make/retain a conact... He did replace the adapter with a truly compatible one needless to say..


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#5
June 23, 2018 at 05:33:32
All of the above plus a little additional information:
In order for the current to go into the battery it needs to be 'pushed' in. What this means is that any charger must have a voltage rating at least a little higher than the actual voltage that a battery will reach at the peak of charge which is slightly higher than the rated voltage and which will settle down after the charge.
Example:
Quite a few years ago when performance radio control electric cars were popular (Kits and custom, not ready made stuff) both on-road and true off-road models, the primary battery packs were 7.2Volt NiCad packs. These were really the first quick charge batteries and it was quickly apparent that the faster the drain and charging, the more important it was to match the cells to each other. These 7.2Volt batteries were charged at between 12Volts and 13.5 Volts typically and reached a peak voltage at charge end of about 10.5Volts. If you were to charge that same pack at 10Volts then the battery would only reach approximately 80% charge and then stop charging. [On the extreme end we were able to push a charge into them in 15 minutes and some really hot rigs ran them down in 5 minutes or less. Talk about battery abuse! Needless to say, only a really top quality battery was usable under these conditions and testing and matching these cells (now referred to as binning) become really important. Some found that charging them on ice in coolers helped pack a little bit more into them and others found that a cooled battery after charging could be quick charged again briefly and it would reach approximately a volt higher and hold this for maybe a minute before a race.]

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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