Solved asus x200 battery draining to fast and charge up 80% any

Asus Vivobook x200ca-db01t 11.6" led not...
August 24, 2017 at 21:46:39
Specs: window 8.1, 4 gb ram
My Asus x200ma battery draining to fast and stop charging at 80% and have tried charging it for more than six hours still yet it won't pass 80%. What can I do to solve this problem

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#1
August 24, 2017 at 22:27:08
✔ Best Answer
The battery is dying and it needs to be replaced.

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#2
August 24, 2017 at 22:33:58
Am not sure it is the battery because the original charger got spoiled and it was after I changed the charger the battery started draining fast and not charging up too 100% any more

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#3
August 24, 2017 at 23:16:18
It's a matter of time, you'll get a message from your operating system that shows the capacity, which is much lower than 100% and that the battery has to be replaced.

Last month, two of my friends got the same problem.
The cells inside the battery are dying one by one.

Btw.:
If your battery has 80% capacity, how long can you work with the laptop without connected to the charger?
It should be at least 2 hours or so.
But mostly after half an hour the system tells you, that your battery is low and needs to be charged.


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#4
August 24, 2017 at 23:25:05
Okay.... Thanks a lot for the information

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#5
August 25, 2017 at 08:07:07
If you let the battery go completely flat/fully discharged, will charge up afterwards and if so to what level?

Occasionally letting a lithium battery (and most are these days) go right down to flat allows them to recharge properly afterwards, and perform as required.


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#6
August 25, 2017 at 10:02:23
Okay.. I will try that too....thanks

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#7
August 25, 2017 at 21:49:29
Also if you are using an aftermarket charger, make sure it is sized correctly for your system. As a battery charges the voltage within the battery rises and more voltage is needed to continue charging it. If you have say a 6 cell battery but the charger is sized for a 4 or 5 cell battery then it will not have enough voltage output for the battery pack to reach its full voltage. Way back when we were running 6cell NiCads in radio control cars the 7.2Volt packs would peak out during charging at just over 11 Volts so the chargers needed to put out a minimum of 12Volts and the faster chargers usually put out about 13.5Volts to ensure complete charging. The same applies to the Lithium batteries that the modern portable electronics use. I know that some laptops are offered with optional larger cell count battery packs which have longer run times but require different chargers. My daughter's HP laptop was purchased with an option of a dual battery combo, the lighter battery for more portable and the heavier battery for more serious work but the charger is larger than the one that would have come with the single (smaller) stock battery set up.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
August 26, 2017 at 02:41:18
Okay....thanks for the information

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#9
August 26, 2017 at 11:53:14
If you let the battery go completely flat/fully discharged, will charge up afterwards and if so to what level?
Occasionally letting a lithium battery (and most are these days) go right down to flat allows them to recharge properly afterwards, and perform as required.

It still charging to 80%


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#10
August 26, 2017 at 20:57:10
If it is an aftermarket charger you might have got the wrong version for your machine. You can test with a volt meter the charger and the battery when discharged and at the 80% charge, if the charger does not put out more than the battery reaches (by at least a volt or two) then it will not increase in the charge it has already achieved. A 6 volt battery may reach 10 or 11 volts at full charge (momentarily) and if the charger is not putting out at least 12volts then it will not fully charge. After the battery sits a minute or o the open circuit voltage will drop to closer to 7Volts and lower when actually being used. It may read maybe 5Volts when fully discharged fully. These are for example only and not the exact numbers you will see and they will also differ depending on the battery type, just to give you an idea of what to expect and a guide to see if the charger is good enough or even dying.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#11
August 27, 2017 at 01:32:39
Thanks alot for the information

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#12
August 27, 2017 at 02:41:04
Does seem the next logical step is along the route which fngers is advising.

Is the charger the original, or a replacement?


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#13
August 27, 2017 at 02:43:18
It is the replacement

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#14
August 27, 2017 at 07:19:16
From what I could find, here's the original charger specs:

Input: AC 100-240V, 50/60Hz
Output: 19V 1.75A 33W

https://adapterfamily.com/index.php...

If you bought a non-ASUS replacement, the output voltage must be 19V but the amperage can be different. Higher amps will charge more quickly, lower amps charge more slowly.


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#15
August 27, 2017 at 07:52:39
The charger I bought is 19v

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#16
August 27, 2017 at 09:05:45
Is it the same specification as the original?

It must be able to deliver the same output voltage, the same current (or higher) and thus at least the same wattage (or higher) If it isn't then that may be the problem.

Volts x Amps = Watts

If your charger doesn't make up/produce at least 33 watts (which rider says is the original charger specification) then you need to replace it with which can/will. One that can deliver a little more would be ok - as long as the volts are as original 19volts); more/higher current is ok.


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#17
August 27, 2017 at 09:08:57
Okay....thanks for the info

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