assess computer problems after lightning hit close to house

March 23, 2013 at 11:07:29
Specs: Windows xp
I use a router from my provider Earthlink. Lightning struck close to our house(real close).I had a fax/ printer on standby and my desktop was on. Hardwired to the router. Lost My printer and the desktop only has a blue screen. Phones went dead also. When service man came :had to run a new power wire to phone system. He told me that surge protectors are for power surges not lightning. Anyway the green light on motherboard is on and seems processer is working. Any ideas. I had this system built for gameing cost alot of money.

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#1
March 23, 2013 at 12:00:30
So, when you boot the computer it POSTS or not? Then you see a blue screen and nothing more?

BTW, surge protectors can work for lightning too. However, they much be better ones than included in a power strip.


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#2
March 23, 2013 at 12:42:51
Yes When I turn on desktop all I see is a blue screen.

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#3
March 23, 2013 at 13:00:42
ok just hooked it up. the fan works on cpu and dvd opens and closes but nothing now on the monitor. says no signal. theres a green light on ,on the motherboard.

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Related Solutions

#4
March 23, 2013 at 16:56:46
Do you hear a single beep when you first start up?

Do you have an add in graphics card or just the integrated?


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#5
March 23, 2013 at 19:05:58
We solved a similar problem. Lightning struck an AC wire far down the street. Damage is always on a path from lightning to earth. Incoming on AC mains. Incoming to the computer and all-in-one printer. (Both on a surge protector that did what the Earthlink tech also said it does - only protect from surges too small to cause electronics damage).

If the surge only has an incoming path, then no damage can happen. But an outgoing path from the printer was via the phone line. And to earth via the FIOS box (FIOS box also damaged). Damage is only on a path from lightning to earth. Fixing damage means both the incoming and outgoing path (through printer and computer) are identified.

BSOD has numbers that are critical. Without those numbers and the associated text, then every reply can only be wild speculation.

Printers are harder to fix. In that above example, an incoming path was via the printers USB port. The outgoing path was via a fax phone line. I replaced the phone line surge protector that failed. That completely restored fax service. The USB port connected to an IC I could not replace. So the printer now runs just fine as an ethernet device.

Appreciate the concept. Having identified the incoming and outgoing path, then the printer now works just fine (except for a failed USB port). That surge went through the printer. But only damaged specific parts. All surge damage is that simple. Hardest part is identifying a surge current path.

What was the incoming and outgoing path through your computer? Numbers from a BSOD are an excellent place to start. Do not make the problem more complex by swapping parts. First identify critically important facts. Changing parts comes later.


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#6
March 24, 2013 at 04:08:59
There is no beep upon startup. I have an EVGA graphic card / ASUS P5N=D motherboard and Ultra 550 watt atx power supply

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#7
March 24, 2013 at 05:08:43
Lightning or any power surge usually damages hardware from the power supply inward. The power supply would be the first component to check. Simply seeing a light on the motherboard doesn't mean your power supply is good.

If you can, swap out the power supply with a compatible known good one as a first step in troubleshooting.


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#8
March 24, 2013 at 05:43:08
Probably the power supply is the starting point for you.
I had a different scenario: The computers in the house are all plugged in through UPS', which like some of the better power strips does include lighting protection, but a short while before the house next door was struck and blew off their chimney (0ld TV antenna with metal straps around chimney to mount it), I had removed the Cable TV and WAN (Ethernet cable from cable modem to router) from their appropriate protection ports on the main UPS in the house. When the house next door was struck, the electric power line was not the issue, but the surge came in over the Cable line. The Cable box and the modem was replaced by Time Warner, but I had to replace my router, two network switches, add new network cards on four desktops, and the printer ethernet port was dead. I had made a test to see if the lack of internet speed was related to the UPS protection, but I put off switching back the cables and it cost me.
Since you appear to have taken the surge through the power lines, try swapping out the power supply first and go from there.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#9
March 24, 2013 at 08:52:00
Thank-You very much all. At least its gives me a starting point

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