Solved Anyone own a notebook that cannot have spare batteries?

July 6, 2015 at 16:39:05
Specs: Wimdows 8.1
I bought a notebook and found out later that it could not have a spare battery also, the battery is not user replaceable which means the owner cannot remove the battery only a repair tech can, so here's the kicker I cannot run the notebook on just AC power. Anyone got any ideas to get around this? please don't suggest obvious stuff, thanks.

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✔ Best Answer
July 7, 2015 at 11:14:58
Might as well jump on the article bashing bandwagon, and comment that it looks like the author was struggling with a positive, especially since his proof is actually in line with industry expectations for Li-Ion. In reality, internal batteries mean you don't need an external bay for the battery, nor do you need a plastic shell around the battery. That means thiner and lighter devices.

craby63: There's not a lot of options. If the battery is weak, you can replace it. Difficulty varies by model. Most are fairly easy, but some of them can be quite difficult to remove. Otherwise, your options are to hang around outlets, or get an external battery pack. I hear Energizer makes a pack with connectors for just about every laptop model out there, but I have not personally used it..

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#1
July 6, 2015 at 17:27:51
"please don't suggest obvious stuff"
That might put folk off from responding in case you deem their suggestions obvious.
However, I'll take that chance:

I'll assume that "I cannot run the notebook on just AC power" means that it won't run on AC alone (not that you don't want to run it that way). Whatever, obvious or not, it can only be either an internal fault with the Notebook or a faulty power adapter. If it requires a tech to change the battery then trying to fix anything more complex inside the Notebook would presumably be even worse. Seems therefore all you can do is check out the adapter and replace it if defective.

If I'm not understanding the question properly then when you come back please give us the make and model number of the Notebook so we at least know what we are looking at.

EDIT:
Perhaps you have in mind something like plugging in an external battery. In which case it depends what's wrong with the internal one. If it is draining power then it would also affect any external battery. The latter would also have to have some charging arrangement and it would be very important to get the external battery voltage, capacity and polarity right. Not something I've ever tried.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#2
July 6, 2015 at 18:01:02
"Anyone got any ideas to get around this?"

Would it be too obvious to suggest returning it for a refund & then buying a laptop that has a removable battery?


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#3
July 6, 2015 at 18:57:48
Let's us take a break and read what this is all about - it's by design - something to think about when shopping for laptops

The difference between Removable and Sealed Laptop Batteries

i_Xp/Vista/W7User


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Related Solutions

#4
July 6, 2015 at 20:18:49
A warning about there being 'no user serviceable components" is often just an attempt to keep stupid people from messing with the product. It wouldn't suprise me if someone had already posted a video or instructions on how to replace the battery.

Are you sure it's the battery? Maybe the notebook isn't working right due to any number of other reasons. You haven't provided any details on what it is or isn't doing.

message edited by DAVEINCAPS


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#5
July 6, 2015 at 21:04:22
I think he/she is looking for longer run time: "...and found out later that it could not have a spare battery also...", something like an external battery or a magic wand (broken along with my crystal ball).
My wife uses a small laptop with a non-removable battery and she just plugs it in when it gets low. She uses a small laptop so she is not tied to the desk chair and can sit wherever she likes, it just happens that there is an outlet near where she likes to sit. Non-removable batteries just means that you cannot swap out batteries to extend the portable use time, it does not mean that the batteries are never replaceable when they go bad. Whether you can replace them or take it to a shop to do it, depends on how good you are working in tight places with delicate things and how difficult it is with that machine.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
July 7, 2015 at 04:38:00
#5 (Fingers) sounds a reasonable possibility... As clearly there are more than a few mini-books (netbooks or whatever) that to all intents appear to have fixed battery; one which cannot be simply popped out as per the standard laptop. But presumably if one is adept at it all one might be able to access the "built-in"/non removable battery and replace it...

Ane thanks to Xpuser for the link; useful resource to point others too anon.


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#7
July 7, 2015 at 07:17:52
As per that linked article, why would there be a generic difference
between removeable and non-removeable batteries? That makes
no sense to me at all. Just because a battery can't be removed
shouldn't mean it will last longer than one which can be removed.
If a long-lasting battery can be made non-removeable, it can just
as well be made removeable.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#8
July 7, 2015 at 08:27:25
"If a long-lasting battery can be made non-removeable, it can just as well be made removeable"

The battery is removable/replaceable, just not by the "average Joe". If you're adept at dismantling a laptop, you should be able to swap the battery yourself when the time comes. But in this throw-away society, the non-adept will opt to replace the laptop rather than paying someone to replace the battery.


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#9
July 7, 2015 at 08:33:59
If the poster gave the make and model number it could prove more easy to determine whether repair is feasible. It's quite possible that a suitable battery can be found.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#10
July 7, 2015 at 09:01:45
riider,

The article XpUser linked to says "The benefit of sealed laptop
batteries is that they have a longer useful life over time. It takes far
longer for a sealed battery to start to lose its ability to hold a charge
than a removable battery." I don't believe it. I can't imagine any
reason for a difference.

-- Jeff, in Minneapolis


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#11
July 7, 2015 at 09:10:57
Perhaps one of the reasons why some "laptops" have non swappable batteries is that it makes the base cover design simpler, cleaner; fewer panels to design in; fewer screws etc... These "little things" may not cost much but across a range - using a given base cover etc. design - they add up to money saved by the manufacturer/vendor. Overall a cheaper design to have moulded...?

And of course "should" the battery require a replacement... the owner is obliged in many cases to go back to the vendor/manufacturer to have the battery replaced; thus generating more income for them... And if it can't be replaced... (perhaps by intent, matter of policy) then the owner is "encouraged" to buy a new device... A lot of bluetooth head sets have batteries that cannot be replaced if they decide to "die"...; and thus the headset becomes a corded connection only - if it had that option as part of the design initially. Failing which the owner has buy yet another headset (and likely again with a non replaceable battery).


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#12
July 7, 2015 at 11:14:58
✔ Best Answer
Might as well jump on the article bashing bandwagon, and comment that it looks like the author was struggling with a positive, especially since his proof is actually in line with industry expectations for Li-Ion. In reality, internal batteries mean you don't need an external bay for the battery, nor do you need a plastic shell around the battery. That means thiner and lighter devices.

craby63: There's not a lot of options. If the battery is weak, you can replace it. Difficulty varies by model. Most are fairly easy, but some of them can be quite difficult to remove. Otherwise, your options are to hang around outlets, or get an external battery pack. I hear Energizer makes a pack with connectors for just about every laptop model out there, but I have not personally used it..

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#13
July 7, 2015 at 20:51:13
I did not read the article but I would think that it should have been stated the other way around. Something like: Manufactures that make laptops with sealed in batteries (presumably) use the best available batteries for a longer overall life span. The money they save on not needing a battery compartment or a rigid battery case can be spent on the better battery. The net advantage for the consumer is a thinner, lighter laptop.

A battery pack is only as good as the weakest cell in the battery. One other thing I learned a while back with high performance electric radio control (cars, planes, etc.) is that the closest the batteries are matches to each other (capacity, charge rates, high discharge rates, and internal resistance), the better the battery back will perform under high draw rates, quicker charge rates, and longer life span. You are less likely to get a cell reversing polarity, going shorted, or loosing its ability to take a charge. This was with NiCads back then, but the general principals still apply, it just takes more effort to test and match cells so it is rarely done in industry.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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