Any data loss when convert primary to logical

Microsoft Ms office home & student 2007...
July 22, 2011 at 22:17:07
Specs: Windows XP SP2, Pentium 4 1.60 GHz/1.50 GB
When converting a primary partition to logical partition, what happens exactly? Will there be any data loss? The primary partition is on my external usb hard drive i use for storage. This partition is where i cloned my Master C: Root Drive before it failed. So XP operating system is on there and I'm concerned it may be interfering with my other XP installation on the new Master C: Root Drive. So i figured if I converted to logical, it will no longer be considered "active" partition. Is this the proper way to solve this issue or am i totally out in left field???

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#1
July 22, 2011 at 22:54:36
What failed on the USB drive? Was it the boot partition? Is the BIOS still set to boot the USB drive first?

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#2
July 22, 2011 at 23:43:18
If you want to convert without data loss then I believe that you have to use a third-party application such as Paragon Disk Manager. But I'm pretty sure that's not your problem (although it's not quite clear if you actually have a problem).

Perhaps you could explain what, if anything, is going wrong?


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#3
July 23, 2011 at 13:40:28
You need to backup to some other place then perform any task that you want to do. That would be the only safe way.

In normal windows, the data is lost.

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#4
July 23, 2011 at 15:04:08
There is no such thing as a logical partition. There are primary partitions ans there are extended partitions. Extended partitions contain as many logical drives as there is room for them and letters to name them with.

Converting a drive on a primary partition to a logical drive within an extended partition will almost certainly result in data loss. The only way to do it is to create the extended partition and then a logical drive and copy the data from one to the other.

If you want to isolate the cloned drive the simplest way to do it is to temporary disconnect it from the system or with a third party partition manager, mark it as hidden. It can be un-hidden later when Windows XP is properly installed.

It should be remembered that if there are any system files on the cloned drive, that is boot.ini, ntdetect.com and ntldr then while that drive is active, any new installation will use the same system files.

That is probably where you problems arise and temporary marking the drive as hidden will force Windows to create a new set of system files on the new installation.

Stuart


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#5
July 23, 2011 at 18:59:46
Thanks for responding so quickly. I do have a program EASEUS Partition Manager that will convert from primary to logical but it doesn't give any information as to what that conversion actually means, just how to select that option etc. And I'm not sure what it means to convert from primary to logical. I don't really have a problem per se. It's a long story of what ive done with my system, due to lack of funds and technological expertise, and I am a bit rusty as it is. My intention is to have (because I read somewhere it's better) only one drive containing an Operating System Installation. Right now I have 3 different partitions with XP installations on each. I only need 1 correct? On the boot drive C: is this right? I read having more than one can sometimes confuse the system and try booting from other than the intended/assigned boot disk drive. Anyway, 2 drives are internal, one of which i'm just planning to use for extra storage space. The other is on my External USB Drive, i created a partition so i could copy my former boot HDD that was failing and save all the data before it died. It appears in computer management any drive/partition with OS installed on it, automatically gets the status of "Active" and the only way i see to not have the partition assigned as "Active" is to change it from primary to logical, but don't want to lose any of the data on this partition by converting. Ultimately, i would just like to have a cleaner running system, without multiples of operating system files, too much confusion, allowing for the potential of added problems. Does any of this make a bit of sense to ANYONE?? I may not be explaining what i don't really know much about very well. Any suggestions or comments would be greatly appreciated. Thanks so much :-)

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#6
July 24, 2011 at 03:23:51
One OS is enough. Having two versions of the same OS in the system achieves nothing.

Normall you would boot from Drive C: but it doesnt have to be. It is the location if the three system files, ntdetect.boor.ini and ntldr that matters. This the system drive. The Wndows folder with all the windows files in is boot drive and that can be anywhere and there can, as you have discovered be many of them This is know as the boot drive.

The boot ans system drive is normally the same but they can be differnt.

You appear to have got yourself into a mess by not understanding exactly what is going on. What I would do is copy all data thea you need to keep from to th eUSB drive. Disconnect it and start again from scratch deleting all partitions and recreating them.

You can do all this with the Windows boot disk. Leave Easeus Partition Manage out of it. Converting a partiiton to something else regardless of what Eaaeus calls it is always a risky proposition.

Stuart


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#7
August 17, 2011 at 08:03:29
My 500 gb harddrive of Hp Pavilion G6 notebook has 4 primary partitions already. First - system (199 MB), Second - C: (450 gb), Third D: Recovery (14.97 gb) and Fourth Hp_tools (103.02 mb). I want to divide my C: drive into 3 partitions 150 gb each. I'm using MiniTool Partition Wizard software. It doesn't allow me to create further partitions because I have already four primary partitions. So, I have to change one to logical partition. Which one should I change?

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#8
August 17, 2011 at 08:16:54
You dont change it to a logical partition. The change it to and extended partition then create logical drive within that extended partition, as many as there is space and letter to accommodate them.

Which one you range would be entirely up to you, that last one in the partition list would be the easiest, probably the HP tools partition. However, if this is an OEM computer be careful you do not disturb file that are needed for system recovery and HP Tools may well be one as this is an HP computer.

Stuart


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#9
August 17, 2011 at 08:32:37
I suspect (though don't know from experience) that Easeus, like Paragon, can convert a primary partition into a logical drive within an extended partition without data loss. Having said that, I wouldn't recommend splitting your partition into 3 relatively small ones. It leaves you with a less flexible setup as you tend to find that one runs out of space whilst the others have plenty of free space. Also it may well slow things up (at best it won't affect speed appreciably - but it's certainly not going to make things faster).

What are you trying to achieve by having so many partitions?


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