All SSD slow since Windows 10

March 3, 2020 at 01:28:52
Specs: Win 10, 8GB
Freshly installed Windows 10 (not upgraded from Windows 7), works quite OK with some things left and right that are wrong, one of them being:

There's a series of SSD in my machine (four now), and they all run kind of slow.

How do I check: I use both my own performance tool, and CrystalDiskMark
My own tool writes a files on the disk, using dd.exe ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dd_(U... ) and then counts how long it takes to write an 8Gig file.
For all of my four disks, this is now reporting speeds between 90 and 150 MB/sec, but mostly in the lower part of that range.
CrystalDiskMark is reporting around 100 MB/sec for the Corsairs
Something is wrong with the Samsungs, as both CrystalDiskMark and the "AS SSD" tool is reporting extreme high, and irregular numbers (3200 MB/sec)
One of these Samsungs is a big, new disk. That one should not be slow. The Corsairs are old.

When testing, I'm watching what other software is running, like my AVG scanner, or Windows background download and such

My Samsungs are connected to the motherboard, using the SATA3 port, with SATA3 cables.
My Corsairs are connected to a PCI-E 2x SATA3 controller, SATA3 cables and all.
CrystalDiskInfo confirms me all is using SATA3

I've disabled Windows Indexing on all drives, and I also assured the Windows Policy is set to use the Write Cache,
but NOT use the Write Cache buffer flushing
If present, all drives have the "Performance" option set (and not the "Quick Removal" option)

I updated the hardware version thingy to the latest version of tthat, using Corsairs and Samsung SSD software

Back to earlier configurations: When this same machine was running Windows 7, it had higher numbers of speeds,
Both for my own performance check, and when running CrystalDiskMark (never run AS SSD on WIndows 7)
The newest disk was never attached to that config.
I must check that more in detail, but it seems like I once hit a 500 MB/sec maximum

The very weird thing is that I also had a test, on one of the first days I had Windows 10, and I hit 300 MB/sec for one drive
(using my own test). It is extremely remarkable that I just cannot get that any more, not even close.
Something happening, AFTER install of Windows 10. It seems like it worked all OK at first, then things went wrong.

I am going to re-install Windows 10 soon, but I'd like to know what is going on here.

I didn't discuss drivers, yet, and I think the issue should be around here ..
I now have ASMedia drivers installed, which I got from the Asus website (my motherboard is Asus), and that should be working OK.
I never have any issue anywhere, it's just all slow.

There's another thing, which can be related, which is that all of the USB3.0 ports are slow as well.


See More: All SSD slow since Windows 10

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#1
March 3, 2020 at 01:41:27
Could you run this and post the link with the result?

https://www.userbenchmark.com/resou...

it compares hardware against 21+ million devices and checks for irregularities, it also paints a clear picture for me and other users

i5-6600K[delid]@4.828GHz Core/4.627 Cache@1.456v | 2x4+8GB DDR4-3018MHzCL12-15-15-28-1@1.465v | Sapphire Nitro+ SE RX 590 8GB@1670Mhz core@1.2v/2236MHz


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#2
March 3, 2020 at 01:49:58
I'll run that this evening. That's a nice tool, I used it before to find that one drive had a SATA2 cable connected ..

What I also forgot to mention: the system is running in AHCI mode, and the disks have TRIM enabled


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#3
March 3, 2020 at 02:14:50
same here, no issues with 2 SSD's

https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserR...


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Related Solutions

#4
March 3, 2020 at 02:59:24
"There's a series of SSD in my machine (four now), and they all run kind of slow"
Were they all disconnected when you installed W10?

message edited by Johnw


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#5
March 3, 2020 at 04:29:56
> Where they all disconnected when you installed W10?

No, because:
- I know how to workaround the issue where Windows installs bootparts on other than the C: disk
- part of Windows re-install is to format all drives and partitions - This cannot be done from Windows as I have programs installed on other than my C: drive ( E:\Program Files )

Why did you ask ?


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#6
March 3, 2020 at 04:41:31
> same here, no issues with 2 SSD's
>
> https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserR...
>

I see your 860 (Evo) runs at around 450 MB/sec

Mine runs at 90-150 MB/sec according to MY test,
1300 MB/sec according to CrystalDiskMark
and - even better - 2229 MB/sec according to AS SSD Benchmark
( all sequential writ tests )

Interesting
I could make a separate thread for the weird numbers for both CrystalDiskMark and AS SSD Benchmark, because it shows something is wrong. I've never seen CrystalDiskMark do something like that ...

It's obvious something is wrong. Only my Samsungs give weird numbers when running CrystalDiskMark. The Corsairs all run around 100MB/sec when tested. Which is low, but consistent.

message edited by Looge


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#7
March 3, 2020 at 04:46:29
"Why did you ask ?"

"I know how to workaround the issue where Windows installs bootparts on other than the C: disk"
You had it covered.


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#8
March 3, 2020 at 04:48:10
How would that affect speed ?


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#9
March 3, 2020 at 05:02:53
"How would that affect speed ?"
No idea, I just know things can go pear shape very easily.

I always do a clean W10 install for everybody, by deleting all the partitions, which leaves an Unallocated drive.

All programs/everything are on the same drive, no partitions.

2nd drive is for backups.

Installed W10 soon after it first release, still going strong, fully updated.


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#10
March 3, 2020 at 05:45:06
Hmm yes, the Program Files on another drive is indeed experimental ... For the moment I have just taken the same method as I used on Windows 7.

I may need to review this. It does look like this ( https://forums.tomshardware.com/thr... )
but it may be just different as well.


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#11
March 3, 2020 at 12:53:47
Tell me what you see:
https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserR...


Note : I have disabled Samsung's RAPID feature
I had it enabled - because I thought it to be benefical - but UserBenchMark states it cannot do performance tests on such disks at it is a sort of a caching system.
This reminds me to the fact that Windows also has caching enabled, maybe both is not good.
The RAPID system would work on all Samsung disks only, which explains why CrystalDiskMark had weird numbers, but only for the Samsung disks. The setting is enabled on system level, not per SSD.

It still can be a good system, but :
1. measuring seems disturbed (UserBenchMark, and CrystalDiskMark AND AS SSD Benchmark has an issue with it)
2. it may require disabling Windows caching (on drive level) for the Samsung drives ?


CrystalDiskMark now has 500+ MB/sec for all of my Samsungs, and UserBenchMark does as well (see URL), but my own write-test tool needs 60 to 80 seconds to write one 8GB file, which is not much more than 100 MB/sec, maybe 140 at best.


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#12
March 3, 2020 at 21:15:50
"I didn't discuss drivers, yet, and I think the issue should be around here .. "
Does this mean you installed all Windows Drivers or not? It is important that the Chipset drivers and Intel Rapid Storage drivers at least are installed.
Assuming you have enough RAM, disable virtual memory. This will improve drive life and prevent the test from using virtual memory and bogging down the drive/SATA interface with two way traffic.
That is all I can think of for now...

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#13
March 3, 2020 at 21:24:34
Just a side question. As long as you are apparently concerned with drive performance and just purchased a new drive, how come you did not purchase a PCIe M.2 drive and if necessary a M.2 PCIe 4x controller card? The speed of the PCIe is actually 3X SATA3 speeds and the future of drives on all but the cheapest. You can now purchase a WD Black NVME PCIe M.2 drive 500GB for just over $100.US with included heat sink with performance nearly that of the 970Pro drives.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#14
March 4, 2020 at 00:36:58
> Just a side question. As long as you are apparently concerned with drive performance and just purchased a new drive, how come you did not purchase a PCIe M.2 drive and if necessary a M.2 PCIe 4x controller card? The speed of the PCIe is actually 3X SATA3 speeds and the future of drives on all but the cheapest. You can now purchase a WD Black NVME PCIe M.2 drive 500GB for just over $100.US with included heat sink with performance nearly that of the 970Pro drives.

Because the motherboard is old and does not support that ?
In another thread there also was the question: can you boot from that. It seemed like it may be possible, but depends on all things involved. These M2 things are for the next computer. I'm stretching this one with approved technology :)

Speed is important in the way that I should get the speed I pay for, but speed is not that important that I consider the newest technology. Actually, I expanded my storage because I needed more GB. I just added 1T to 3 disks in total only half a TB

message edited by Looge


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#15
March 4, 2020 at 00:56:14
> Does this mean you installed all Windows Drivers or not?
> It is important that the Chipset drivers and Intel Rapid
> Storage drivers at least are installed.
> Assuming you have enough RAM, disable virtual memory.
> This will improve drive life and prevent the test from
> using virtual memory and bogging down the drive/SATA
> interface with two way traffic.
> That is all I can think of for now...
>

Well, that is a good question. You know, this is my first
Windows 10 install, and I'm actually debugging all of this.
In the old Windows 7 way, I would install my USB3.0 drivers
because Windows 7 wouldn't do that. Note that the USB3.0
and the SATA drivers come from the same source: ASMedia.

In the device manager I see that Windows installed some
SATA drivers. No clue if they are good or not.

But I never installed any SATA drivers, even on Windows 7.
Or, not that I'm aware of.

But now on Windows 10, all is different.
Windows installed all these drivers itself ... Remember
that on Windows 7, you needed to install network drivers
as one of the first things. Nothing of that anymore.
Actually, I didn't install any drivers. Well, not on purpose
since when you install printer software, he does things
like that ..

But now, I'm installing ASMedia SATA drivers, just because
the speed is off. But, I'm not sure why it is off,
because there are different copies of ASMedia drivers
involved here. Currently I have the ones from the Asus
website itself, which are suited for Windows 10 ...
... but which date from 2015. Currently have one disk
that hits 240MB/s, which is not fast enough, but faster
than what I have when the issue occurs. I'm certain it
has to do with drivers ... it's a big old mess.


Note I also have an external SATA controller, but that
is for my slow/old disks only. I'm not focussing on those.
These drivers are actually going downhill anyway.

So, virtual memory : I disable that on any machine I work
on, and make sure other than C: drive don't have such a
file either. So, in this case: none of the SSD's have
a pagefile or swapfile. It's on the first things I disable
on every install. They should have removed that feature
from Windows 10, as it was a system for low memory
machines, which are long gone now. Like the 2GB 32-bit
Windows 98 machines, and such.

message edited by Looge


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#16
March 4, 2020 at 03:30:29
> it compares hardware against 21+ million devices and checks for irregularities,
> it also paints a clear picture for me and other users

It's indeed a nice tool to diagnose things. In the disk section, there were two statements I'm interested in now:

"Proprietary drivers (eg Intel RST or Samsung NVME) often perform offer better performance than Windows stock drivers."

-> So, I have a Samsung, I need to test this "NVME" thing. Not sure why I'm not just trying to get drivers from Samsung, instead of messing with ASMedia stuff (while my SATA-III ports are Intel in fact).

"SATA-3 drives on non-Intel (eg ASMedia) ports sometimes limit peak speeds."

-> As stated, my ports are Intel, but Asus tells me I need/can use ASMedia drivers from 2015, to run these ports.


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#17
March 4, 2020 at 03:38:06
Also found many Windows Events, which are fired just by starting up Windows.

At first, it looks like he's installing driver, on every startup ? Not sure if that is even a possible scenario ... It surely indicates something is wrong.


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#18
March 4, 2020 at 21:33:55
After a fresh install of Windows 10 (or an upgrade install) there will be Windows Updates for a while unless you manually go in and search for updates and install all important ones.

Install drivers from motherboard website as long as WIndows 10 compatible, these are best for your hardware and will get you the best performance (except graphics for distinct cards, they should be from GPU mfg (NVidia, AMD). Install Chipset Driver first, then SATA and Intel Rapid Storage and anything recommended or that covers hardware you have.

I am not sure how old your motherboard is but certainly it can be an issue with NVME drives on older boards, especially as boot drives. I am currently running one on a Gigabyte Z97X-UD3 as a boot drive and with Windows 7 (I will eventually go the W10 route but I am stalling) to be even more difficult. True I had to do a BIOS update, a Windows 7 patch, and a long list of settings (BIOS & other) before cloning it over to the drive but it has been working well for a while now. I now actually moved my first M.2 over to my slightly slower PCIe 2.0 4X for primary storage and added a second to the PCIe 3.0 8X port for the boot drive. Programs and files load even faster now. Windows 10 should be more compatible as long as a latest BIOS update supports booting to PCIe drives and NVME in general.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#19
March 6, 2020 at 00:21:38
That's nice, but in this thread I'm looking how to make my SSD's run faster. They still run at around 100MB/sec, including my new Samsung 860 Pro.

This specific drive was not actually attached at moment of Windows (10) install, but my older 840 was. And my Corsairs also were.

I presume I ended up in a mess because I manually tried ASMedia drivers, where that may not be necessary.

There's one conclusion I do have already, which is that Samsung's "Rapid" messes up the performance measuring. Not saying the feature is bad, but it just shows weird numbers when trying to diagnose the speed. ( But, not with MY test, because my test is a very basic copy and time-function, a real world test, unlike whatever Crystal and others are doing).

message edited by Looge


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#20
March 6, 2020 at 14:25:07
"They still run at around 100MB/sec, including my new Samsung 860 Pro."

have you set the bios option to use sata 3? you should eb able to set the sata mode to 1,2,3 and auto per port

specs: https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserR...


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#21
March 9, 2020 at 01:30:55
I haven't seen that setting in my BIOS. The only thing there is, is the AHCI enable- or disablement. And, that is set to true ..

CrystalDiskMark states SATA3-SATA3 (for all drives), which means it sees the drive as SATA3 drives, and also connected as SATA3.
I know because it was SATA3-SATA2 (or the other way round) when I had my SATA3 drive connected to my SATA2 controller.

I think I'm passed the SATA-thing, I have personally installed a SATA3-controller, and I have checked that my current drives are connected to the SATA3-ports on my board, not to the SATA-2 ports.

I have removed my Samsung, Corsair and ASMedia software in the mean while. The status is still the same, but I'm not sure the drivers are gone.


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#22
March 9, 2020 at 05:12:22
RE #11 they seem to perform average actually, the corsair force 3 120GB SSD's.
you cant make them any faster :( (I Looked up the specs)

also you seem to have not enabled XMP on your ddr3-1600MHZ kit, they run at 1333. you can enable it through the bios somewhere under memory settings

specs: https://www.userbenchmark.com/UserR...


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#23
March 9, 2020 at 05:43:17
The Corsairs are old and slow, but also these had higher (better) numbers in my previous tests. One of those was actually running on a SATA2-port back then. It's fair to say that they are handicapped by their state, but that doesn't mean nothing else is holding them back.

I must check my memory BIOS/UEFI settings; I may have lost these settings when I replaced the battery. But I have a video of all of my BIOS/UEFI settings. If the setting was changed, I'll revert it back to that setting.


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#24
March 10, 2020 at 02:26:13
The memory frequency was always set to 1333. That may be a mistake, or it may be intentional - Not going to change it myself.

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