Solved After BSOD Boot takes 10-15 minutes to Logon

April 6, 2013 at 18:52:38
Specs: Windows 7
After BSOD, Extremely long boot. 5 minutes or more to leave opening POST/Setup Screen, Pauses twice more before Windows Login Screen
BIOS Corruption or Hardware?
Possible corrections?

Abit IX38 QuadGT
Dual-Quad Pentium CPU
RAM: 8 Gigabyte
Win7 Pro, 64-bit
Phoenix-AwardBIOS v6.00pg


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✔ Best Answer
April 11, 2013 at 12:42:02
Just for info there are two hardware issues which have found to be the reason for this particular BSOD (although there are probably other possibilities).

1. Faulty RAM.

2. Faulty Hard Disk.

If you have been doing any recent work inside the computer then clean the RAM edge connectors with a pencil eraser then insert and remove the stick(s) a few times. Sometimes a very slight movement can put the RAM onto an oxidized part of its edge connector. If you have more than one RAM stick then try them one at a time to see if that proves anything.

You can download a memory (RAM) test here:
http://www.memtest.org/

It would be worth running chkdsk like this:
Open the "Computer" window.
Right-click on the drive in question (usually C).
Select the "Tools" tab.
In the Error-checking area, click <Check Now>.

Here is a thorough hard disk test:
http://www.seagate.com/support/down...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks



#1
April 6, 2013 at 21:28:03
How about giving us the EXACT error number from the Blue Screen? That would help us to help you...

Some HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions 7 Golds


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#2
April 7, 2013 at 07:33:37
Here's what we'd need: http://ifixo.files.wordpress.com/20...

A more complete spec list would be helpful too. What is a "Dual-Quad Pentium CPU"? Abit is long gone but I found your board specs listed at newegg:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...


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#3
April 7, 2013 at 09:36:42
Well this could be hardware or software depending on where the bsod happens, does it happen at boot or when ur inside windows ?

computers are a second home
NVIDIA GeForce


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Related Solutions

#4
April 7, 2013 at 14:43:04
As well as the info depicted in the first link in #1, look to see if a file name is mentioned (it won't be too prominent and might not even be there). If you do find one that could help too.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#5
April 10, 2013 at 22:30:08
OK guys here is the info requested: (I think)

Time of this report: 4/11/2013, 01:18:37
Operating System: Windows 7 Professional 64-bit (6.1, Build 7601) Service Pack 1 (7601.win7sp1_gdr.130318-1533)
Language: English (Regional Setting: English)
System Manufacturer: OEM
System Model: OEM
BIOS: Phoenix - AwardBIOS v6.00PG
Processor: Intel(R) Core(TM)2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs), ~2.4GHz
Memory: 8190MB RAM
Available OS Memory: 8190MB RAM
Page File: 6458MB used, 9920MB available
Windows Dir: C:\Windows
DirectX Version: DirectX 11
DX Setup Parameters: Not found
User DPI Setting: Using System DPI
System DPI Setting: 96 DPI (100 percent)
DWM DPI Scaling: Disabled
DxDiag Version: 6.01.7601.17514 64bit Unicode

And:
The computer has rebooted from a bugcheck. The bugcheck was: 0x00000019 (0x0000000000000003, 0xfffffa800ab5b050, 0xfffffa800ab5b050, 0x0000000000000000).

There is virtually never a crash on boot. But, the last BSOD was when PC was already in the process of powering DOWN.


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#6
April 11, 2013 at 05:41:02

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#7
April 11, 2013 at 12:42:02
✔ Best Answer
Just for info there are two hardware issues which have found to be the reason for this particular BSOD (although there are probably other possibilities).

1. Faulty RAM.

2. Faulty Hard Disk.

If you have been doing any recent work inside the computer then clean the RAM edge connectors with a pencil eraser then insert and remove the stick(s) a few times. Sometimes a very slight movement can put the RAM onto an oxidized part of its edge connector. If you have more than one RAM stick then try them one at a time to see if that proves anything.

You can download a memory (RAM) test here:
http://www.memtest.org/

It would be worth running chkdsk like this:
Open the "Computer" window.
Right-click on the drive in question (usually C).
Select the "Tools" tab.
In the Error-checking area, click <Check Now>.

Here is a thorough hard disk test:
http://www.seagate.com/support/down...

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#8
May 11, 2013 at 09:38:35
Seems like you solved the problem. If you come back, which particular thing fixed it?

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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