Add OEM ID to my PC

December 14, 2010 at 02:08:28
Specs: Windows XP, AMD Athlon X2
How do I add the OEM to my PC

See More: Add OEM ID to my PC

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#1
December 14, 2010 at 05:36:40
OEM = Original Equipment Manufacturer. How are you going to "add the OEM"?

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#2
December 14, 2010 at 07:39:23
Hi mickliq,

Yes your are correct.

I built the computer myself and would like to add the OEM, but would like to know HOW.

Thanks,
Mulgravia.


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#3
December 14, 2010 at 08:29:07
The fact that you built the computer yourself doesn't make you an OEM.

All you can do now is to get an retail OEM version of Windows and install it.

If you want an OEM status similar to Dell or HP your are going to have to negotiate with Microsoft for an OEM license. You are not going to get that unless you can guaranty to build and sell a certain number of computers and that tends to run into the hundreds if not thousands.

Stuart


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Related Solutions

#4
December 14, 2010 at 09:18:50
Just as an example, ASUS makes motherboards for HP to use in their computers, therefore ASUS is the OEM.

I'm really not sure what it is you're asking for?


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#5
December 15, 2010 at 06:30:25
Hi StuartS,

It would appear that you surmised that you were correct and I’m sorry to tell you that your surmise was incorrect.

In fact it is very easy to change or enter a new O.E.M providing you have the official COA Label, which contains the OEM information supplied with the Windows XP CD.

Microsoft even provide the information for making the change, renewing or creating a new OEM; they even supply information for the OEM logo, concerning size etc….

Created a new logo and an Oeminfo.ini file and that was it! All-in-All it took me just around 45 minutes to complete, including making the BMP image.

The point of the exercise was to ensure that my PC is genuine and would be sellable if I ever choose to do so.

Regards,
Mulgravia.


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#6
December 15, 2010 at 07:26:28
In fact it is very easy to change or enter a new O.E.M providing you have the official COA Label, which contains the OEM information supplied with the Windows XP CD.

For that you need to have a legitimate copy of Windows XP installed and running, something you consistently failed to mention in you original and subsequent posts.

My assertion that you go out and buy a retail OEM version of Windows XP should have given you a clue that you had omitted some vital piece of information.

I can only answer questions based on the information provided. If you had said you had installed Windows XP and wanted to brand it with your own information, that would have been different. It still would not have made it OEM.

Stuart


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#7
December 15, 2010 at 08:23:39
I think what I was asking about was very obvious - I can see no way that the changes could be made without an OS System installed - how would one access the software if there was no OS System installed? - it must all be done in the Windows System32 folder!

I had already bought two retail OEM versions of Windows XP, installed one and will use the other for a second build Micro PC.

You also did not make things clear - you could have simply aked if I had installed the software.

It also turned out that your last paragraph in Post #3 was inaccurate

Quote:-
You are not going to get that unless you can guaranty to build and sell a certain number of computers and that tends to run into the hundreds if not thousands.
Unquote.

I do have a genuine OEM licence and I did not have to ".... negotiate with Microsoft for an OEM license"

Why are you being so picky?

Be happy!
Mulgravia.


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#8
December 15, 2010 at 08:56:04
It wasn't obvious to me and it wasn't obvious to misckliq.

I do have a genuine OEM licence and I did not have to ".... negotiate with Microsoft for an OEM license"

You have a license to install one single copy of Windows.

You do not have a license to install hundreds or thousands of copies on hundreds or thousands of computers which is what OEMs like Dell and HP have.

Stuart


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#9
December 16, 2010 at 01:46:19
Hi StuartS,

You are beginning to sound petty now, what is your purpose? Are you trying to help, put me down or just trying to appear superior and win an argument?

My original query was not about OEM Licensing about which I am already familiar; it was about how to enter the OEM licensing into my computer. In fact the statement made by both you and Mickliq concerning OEM licensing are incorrect.

As I said previously, I have TWO licenses, because I purchased two WindowsXP CD's complete with licences. So you are correct to say that I "do not have a licence to install hundreds or thousands of computers" furthermore no-one has to, when building their own Desktop PC's.

I have never said that I want to build and sell PC's, these are for my personal use only. In any case the OEM CD that Dell etc., have is quite different CD's named as "Microsoft Retail Software" often with multiple licences which you should already know.

The motherboard manufacture is not the OEM licence holder; it is the Builder of the PC. Motherboard manufacturers do not give you a licence when you buy the motherboard - it ONLY comes with the purchase of the Software CD.

The statement made by both you and Mikeq concerning OEM licensing are incorrect; they are as follows copied/pasted from Microsoft website - Certificate of Authenticity (COA) labels for OEM.….

FROM MICROSOFT

Who Is a System Builder? A system builder is anyone who assembles, reassembles, or installs software on a new or used computer system.

There is a growing market for "do-it-yourself" home PC hobbyists who assemble PCs from components for their own use. Microsoft retail software licenses are the appropriate licenses for the do-it-yourself market.

As you can see, the above two statements are quite different from yours!

Computing is my hobby and has been even before Microsoft Windows came into the market. I have been a computer owner and user since 1980 and used to run a computer club in my spare time in the early 80's, so I do know a bit about the subject, during that time I had a ZX81, Spectrum and a Superbrain all-in-one.

I am happy to say the PC I built was my first ever build and it ran and worked perfectly right from the start and has done so ever since.

There will be no more comments from me concerning this subject, which for me is just a waste of my time, but I hope, at least, that you have learned something yourself here.

Take Care and check the facts,
Mulgravia.


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#10
December 16, 2010 at 02:28:26
You have a problem my friend. You ask a question which causes total contusion then give an answer to a question that was never asked.

Never once did you mention that you had already installed an operating system until your third post. Look back at what you wrote and the answer that were given.

An OEM is a system builder. A system builder is not necessarily an OEM. You are getting yourself totally confused. The quote you mention talks about retail versions. It says nothing about OEM.

Learned something, I certainly have. Beware of people you don't know how to ask a question.

Stuart


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