Solved acomdata 1TB external hard drive

December 2, 2013 at 08:51:02
Specs: Windows 7
I have an acomdata 1TB external hard drive that I have a lot of data on, but now when you turn it on, the blue light ticks with a red light continuously and I can not access. I am not sure if there is a diagnosis or fix to it, but I want to get some of the data off of it and on to another drive. Can anyone help?

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✔ Best Answer
December 8, 2013 at 08:40:51
Didn't work! I will just trash it and start over. It was a backup to my old systems, so I think I will set up two drives (one as a backup and the other as a backup to the backup). Thanks for your help, it was worth a try.
Rich


#1
December 2, 2013 at 11:05:34
"the blue light ticks"
I assume you mean the external drive ticks. Unfortunately that is usually the symptom of a failed or failing drive requiring replacement.

Getting information off a failed drive is often difficult without expensive software. You could always try the free version of Recuva but I'm none too hopeful:
http://www.piriform.com/recuva

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#2
December 2, 2013 at 14:14:51
Does the external hard drive show up when viewing Windows Disk Management? If so, post all the information listed for that drive.

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#3
December 2, 2013 at 15:42:32
Presuming the drive is going down - as in faulty… there is away you may be able to get data off it… without using recovery software - which requires the drive to be accessible of course…

Remove the drive from its housing; wrap in a couple of pieces of paper towel; place in a plastic bag (the kind used to wrap food, sandwiches in); seal the bag. Place in the fridge (NOT the freezer) on the top shelf. Leave for a couple of hours or so.

Then remove bag from fridge, open plastic bag and remove the drive - still in its paper towel wrapping. Loosen paper towel a little - but ensuring drive is still fully covered/wrapped in the paper towel - lay it (still wrapped) somewhere flat and safe - for about 15mins or so; then remove paper towel; check drive is dry - no condensation on it… Replace in housing and reconnect its internal bits etc. as before. Connect it to your computer…

If you're lucky - and often one is at this stage… you may be able to access the drive… If so copy off as much data as you can as soon as you can; to optical media and/or another hard drive.. If the drive goes down again.. repeat the above cooling process completely; then reconnect etc. and see if you can recover more data.

This process can work for a few times at least; but don't count on the drive anymore as as safe/secure storage medium; replace it ASAP.

Something I discovered recently when I had an NAS server drive fail… It had a pair of Western Digital drives installed. and one simply failed. (My NAS is a mirrored system - so data was safe on the other drive… phew!) Long story short.. the drives I installed initially in the NAS were standard PC/laptop drives; not intended to be on for extended periods of time.. Chats with Western and also Qnaps (who make my NAS ts210) brought out that there are at least three grades of HD, and they are colour coded too… Each colour represents the degree of durability etc. of that series… Just now cannot remember which is which - but… Suggest you decide which drive you want to use as a replacement; check with manufacturer as to which are designed/spec'd for long term continuous use (as in on long periods of time…) and get one of those (even if a little more cash). You want one that is designed for server use - and thus maybe expected to be on for extended periods of time.. Standard PC/laptop drives are not so designed. At the very least get the mid-range series of drive. Even then tend not to leave it running 365x24x7; but perhaps power it down fully (as totally off (no mains power in) every now and then…; and let it rest/cool...

Even better - can you extend your pennies to a small NAS (a 2 drive - a mirror system - at least), as that way if a drive fails… and they do… you will still likely have data safe on the "other" drive in the mirrored pair. It is also advised of course to have a backup for an NAS too - and that "can" be a single drive - regularly updated and then powered down…

I have used the cooling in the fridge routine a couple of times at least - for myself and friends various. It has worked each time. I got that routine here - "quite a while back"; but for the life of me I can't recall who passed it on - for which my apologies to him.. If he reads this and can confirm who he is - would be most useful? All credit to him...


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#4
December 3, 2013 at 05:54:58
No! It doesn't show up at all. I can't see it. I think I will try the refrigerator trick first then the recovery software and then not sure what else I will try. The information is not critical, but I do believe that I have some old data on it the I have been looking for.
Thanks

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#5
December 3, 2013 at 05:59:59
I will let you know how things turn out as soon as I have time to mess with it.
Thanks again,
Rich

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#6
December 3, 2013 at 08:03:18
mmm If you can't "see" the drive anywhere - whichever OS and system you try it with… recovery software won't work; as obviously the computer running the recovery software has to be able to see/access the drive…

Considering the number of drive failures that seem to crop up here (and other forums/fora..) one is inclined to feel that drive quality and long term life has decreased somewhat overall? And does point to the need for everyone to ensure they have copies of their "stuff" elsewhere too…

Based on pro and personal experiences… I am a convert to having a personal NAS (mirror system at least); with an additional single drive a backup (a copy) of the NAS that is updated regularly - and then powered down… until required again...


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#7
December 3, 2013 at 12:14:47
As the Areal Density increases on the platters in a hard drive the chance of head misalignment increases. Any small bump can cause problems. Increasing the Areal Density of the platters is how drive manufacturers are able to ever increase the storage capacity while decreasing the cost of hard drives.

See the link below for more on Areal Density.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Area_d...

The old school method of attempting to get a drive with bad bearings going is called the freezer trick for a reason.

See the link below for more on the freezer trick.

https://www.google.com/search?q=fre...


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#8
December 3, 2013 at 15:10:46
OtH…. I had a feeling it was you who put me onto the fridge (not the freezer…) trick. As I say above I have used a few times - in the fridge… to great and successful effect… Not sure I'd go so far the freezer though…; but who knows?

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#9
December 3, 2013 at 15:22:34
The concept is to shrink the parts, thus increasing the clearances. The colder the better.

That said, if the hard drive is already rotating then frig or freezer will not help. Sounds like the heads have crashed.


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#10
December 3, 2013 at 15:36:06
I have had success when the heads were rotating, clicking etc…; and also when there wasn't anything happening - no action, no noise - meaning no access - until the cooler session… (bit like Steve McQueen in the Great Escape…?)

Will be interesting/useful to see what happens here...


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#11
December 5, 2013 at 12:27:08
I tried the freezer, but no joy! It still just clicks. Guess I should just hit it with a magnet and trash it.

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#12
December 5, 2013 at 12:52:06
Did you remove the drive from the enclosure?

Did you try connecting directly to an internal controller?


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#13
December 5, 2013 at 12:58:59
mmm good idea - removing drive from an external enclosure - might help...

My presumption is that one "always" does the chilling routine with the bare drive; no external housing etc.


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#14
December 6, 2013 at 04:38:35
I did remove it from the enclosure, but I did not try connecting to an internal controller - I do not feel comfortable enough to open the computer and mess with all that other stuff. I will try the refrigerator trick as well. I did use the two zip lock bags, but I also noticed condensation as it was warming up - is that a problem? I did not wrap it in paper towels, but I will this time.

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#15
December 6, 2013 at 06:00:43
Paper towel is important (at least from my own experience); as it will absorb any condensation that will occur - especially when removed from the fridge…

I wrap mine in paper towel (completely encase the drive and closely so too); wrap it in a plastic bag - squeezing out as much air as one can reasonably do… Place in fridge for a couple of hours…. Then remove from fridge, open (or remove) plastic bag and let it all breathe - with paper towel still in-place. (I have usually removed the plastic bag when taking it all out of the fridge.) Loosen towel a little perhaps - but ensure it is still covering the drive… After about an hour (possibly more like half-an-hour…?) completely remove paper towel; drive should still be quite cool/cold… Then try the drive - after checking no moisture/condensation on the drive case/electronics. And if any condensation/moisture present simply blot it away with a tissue? I have never found any condensation on a drive thus far…

If you're not happy going inside the a PC case etc. to try connecting to a controller that way (it would be a desktop system of course… ), then consider a usb adapter for connecting drives to a computer…? They come in both EIDE and SATA styles; often both connectors/adapters included in the kit… They don't cost much and are a useful item to have at any time? Also of course there are drive docks that allow one to simply place the drive in the dock, and connect the dock via a usb connection… Some docks are for EIDE, some for SATA and some for both… The dock is a more compact approach and also allows one, at any time, to more easily connect a drive and copy to/from it - with having a little nest of cables/adapters etc. around your computer work-space/area? I haver the cable and adapters kit; as it was all that was around when I need such an approach; but an EIDE/SATA dock is obviously much tidier… Although as this HD is a USB connection already - may not be worth that adapter kit/dock approach on this occasion; and have to say I'm not sure the internal controller would make much (if any difference); although it might be worth to try?


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#16
December 8, 2013 at 08:40:51
✔ Best Answer
Didn't work! I will just trash it and start over. It was a backup to my old systems, so I think I will set up two drives (one as a backup and the other as a backup to the backup). Thanks for your help, it was worth a try.
Rich

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#17
December 8, 2013 at 09:05:39
OK, thanks for popping back to let us know.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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