Acer Aspire E5-575G won't boot, repair tech at shop....

December 21, 2017 at 14:06:55
Specs: Windows 10
repair tech said that it is a hardware issue, tried to re-install Windows 10, but it won't boot and he tried everything. 4 months past warranty. Acer post-warranty, 3rd party repair company said after hearing specs on my F12 set-up utility screen that it is not motherboard or hard drive, is a software issue, but wants $99 to connect me with technicians, but won't guarantee that it can be fixed, despite being certain of software issue. Should I pay, as they may have Acer-specific knowledge? Or is it likely to be a waste of money--hardware issue. Is the laptop junk? And if not, who can fix it?...can't even talk with Acer because it is out of warranty. Any help or guidance is greatly appreciated.
Scott

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#1
December 21, 2017 at 14:47:40
I hope you're not paying for this poor service.

How about explaining exactly what's displayed on the laptop screen when you try to boot it up.


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#2
December 21, 2017 at 15:24:31
Be very wary of third-party repair outfits claiming to represent (in this case) Acer... Sadly there are many outfits "out there" who offer assistance and frequently will simply resort to using manufacturer (in this case Acer) support info.. Or take the money, do a few things - as in go through the motions...; and then either try to sell you new kit, or charge you for software fixes you can do yourself (with a little help from friends on some forums).

To isolate hardware possbles... download a Linux ISO and burn to a dvd. See if it will boot with that dvd. If it does it will load into RAM only and present a windows style desktop. Don't install it to the hard drive. If it boots to Linux dvd etc. as above then you know the hardware is lkely OK,and thus one starts to look elsewhere.

When the laptop powers up, is there a message saying which key to press to enter bios settings? If so, then enter bios and set dvd to first item in boot order

How are trying to re-install wndows-10; and any error messages?

There are various flavours of Linux and ubuntu (ubuntu.com) is one.

message edited by trvlr


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#3
December 21, 2017 at 15:31:49
I haven't yet paid the local technician...he put in time, and I'm not sure what the bill will be yet. He was able to get my data off of the laptop, onto a flashdrive, after totally scrubbing the defective Windows 10 off. But when he attempted to reinstall, he couldn't get it to boot. The question I asked was from a telephone call to Toshiba's after-warranty contracted service place. That person said that it is not hard drive or motherboard, and was a software issue...but the deal is I pay the $99 just to be connected to the technicians...with no money back guarantee if they can't fix it over the phone. It doesn't sound right, but I paid nearly $600 for this laptop, only 16 months ago, and I can't be sure what's wrong with it, and don't know if this is junk, and if I should buy a new one. But apparently it isn't the mother board if it lights up and starts, but there is some type of hardware issue, according to the tech, preventing it from booting. He said he tried everything.

There is currently no operating system, given that he scrubbed it. But I have a downloaded Windows 10 on a flashdrive, from my four hours on the phone with the Windows tech, when he tried to get it to boot (that was before I took it to the shop).

As to your question, when I press the F2 button repeatedly on startup, and get to the Setup Utility screen, and move the tab over to boot, it says on the priority list:

1. HDDO
2. HDD1: LITEON CV1-8B256
3. ATAP1 CDROM: Slimtype DVD A DA8AESH

It also has some things after numbers 4-7 in the list. But I read the first three to the intake phone rep at the Toshiba third party repair company, and that is all he needed to hear to tell me that it was definitely a software, and not a hardware issue, and that I could spend $99 to get connected to one of their technicians. But he wouldn't say that I could have money back if they couldn't fix it. Please advise.

Thanks,

Scott


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#4
December 21, 2017 at 15:36:08
Thanks...I just saw your reply,as we crossed messages. Is there anything else you would add after reading what I wrote above? Is the Linux OS free for download? How do I get it? I am a computer novice, and only know a few basic things...not much.

Thanks for your quick reply!

Scott


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#5
December 21, 2017 at 15:40:06
This outfit was what I got when calling Acer directly. As soon as you put in your computer ID number, they reply that it is out of warranty, and send you to this company. I wasn't able to talk to anyone at Acer at all, but this outfit is where they send people who are out of warranty.

Scott


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#6
December 21, 2017 at 16:31:11
Are you at least somewhat computer savvy? Did you create the Recovery Media when you 1st purchased the laptop? If not, see if you can do a factory reset. The "tech service" may have already tried it but there's no way for us to know for sure.

Make sure the laptop is completely powered off. Unplug the AC adapter, remove the battery, then press & hold the power button for about 30 seconds. After doing that, reinstall the battery & reconnect the AC adapter. Press & hold Alt+F10, then press the power button. As soon as you see 'Please wait' under the Acer logo, you may release the keys. Assuming it works properly, an Options menu will come up. Select 'Troubleshoot' & then select 'Reset this PC'. Then just follow the onscreen prompts.


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#7
December 21, 2017 at 16:33:26
Seems you have an SSd drive and a cd/dvd drive. And the SSD is set as first to boot.

I'm not sure to what the first entry HDD0 is referring... That " 0 " designation would seem to imply there is a small recovery partition at the start of the SSD, and the bulk of the drive is HDD1 (a second and much larger partition).

Enter bios and set the cd/dvd as first boot item. Then try the ubuntu routine as above.

Also... if possible copy "all" your data on the flash drive to another usb connected hard drive. Equally if no usb hard drive option available, then duplicate that flsh drive to another, and check it is fully accessible too.

Flash drives are not a reliable storage system...; they can fail anytime... So either a hard drive duplication or another flash drive - just in-case...

All linux variants are free. Go to ubuntu.com and look for an ISO which download and burn to a dvd; then boot with that after setting boot order as above.

There are other flavours of lnux too, and one or others here more familiar with them very likely will drop across here and suggest/advise re' them

Presuming linux does load (into RAM only) then via its equivalent to windows explorer you ought to be able at least see the SSD.

Incidentally do you have the manual for your Acer? The full version will detail how to re-install windows... Also, did you ever make a recovery disk for the system when received? Invariably pholks don't even though Acer etc. strongly encourage making it.


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#8
December 21, 2017 at 16:42:31
This a lnk to ACER Support manuals etc. for your model

https://www.acer.com/ac/en/MY/conte...

You want the larger manual - second in the list. of 3 docments.

It's past my bedtime so I'll hand over to the day shift in Canada/USA and Australia amongst others...

message edited by trvlr


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#9
December 21, 2017 at 20:16:11
The following might be what was missed....from the manual:

"Before performing a restore operation, please check the BIOS
settings.
1. Check to see if Acer disk-to-disk recovery is enabled or not.
2. Make sure the D2D Recovery setting in Main is Enabled.
3. Exit the BIOS utility and save changes. The system will reboot."

After doing the above, you should be able to do the Recovery as I explained in response #6. You can skip the part about draining the power.


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#10
December 22, 2017 at 05:53:40
Thank you riider and trvlr. I will try what you suggest, e.g. system restore, and/or installing a different operating system (Linux ubuntu) to the RAM. I'll be back in touch after I try these. I appreciate the help. I am not very computer savvy but think I can do what you both described above. Thanks again.

Scott


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#11
December 22, 2017 at 09:09:46
When you run Ubuntu or similar from a dvd it operates as if installed to the hard drive, but of course is only loaded into RAM. When you close out from Linux from a dvd then it simply deletes itself from memory (RAM) and the system is as it was prior.

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#12
December 23, 2017 at 07:25:24
Okay thanks,

I downloaded ubuntu to a dvd. I then changed the boot manager. I wasn't sure whether to put "ATAP1 CDROM: Slimtype DVD A DA8AESH" to the top of the list, or "USB CD ROM :" so I tried each one at the top in separate trials. I made sure that D2D recovery was enabled in Main menu as Riider advised, but I couldn't find the separate Acer disc to disc recovery that Riider mentioned. In both cases, with the two different DVD options at the top of the list, I hear the DVD spin for about 15-20 seconds, and then stop. The ACER name comes up for 2-3 seconds on startup, and then a black screen with a white cursor flashing in the top left corner is all that is seen. And it stays that way after the DVD stops spinning. Should I try the system restore after removing the battery and using the troubleshoot process as Riider described? Is there something I didn't do correctly with the ubuntu DVD boot, or does this mean it is most likely a hardware issue? Does anyone fix those? Because ACER won't even provide a way I can talk with them directly. Please advise, and thanks for the support. Scott


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#13
December 23, 2017 at 18:10:46
You're not booting a USB device so the correct item on the top of the list should be "ATAP1 CDROM: Slimtype DVD A DA8AESH". The 2nd device should be the solid state hard drive "HDD1: LITEON CV1-8B256".

I wouldn't have recommended Ubuntu but regardless of which Linux version you burn to a DVD, it must be done correctly. Don't just copy the .ISO file to the disc, it has to be "unpacked" & burned using the appropriate software. I recommend CDBurnerXP: https://cdburnerxp.se/en/home

Try Linux Mint Xfce 64-bit rather than Ubuntu: https://linuxmint.com/edition.php?i...

Since you said you made the change in the BIOS, before doing the above, try the following (I'm assuming you haven't?) as explained in response #6:

1. power off the laptop
2. press & hold Alt+F10
3. press the power button while still holding Alt+F10
4. as soon as you see 'Please wait' under the Acer logo, release the keys
5. select 'Troubleshoot'
6. select 'Reset this PC'

If that doesn't work, you either have a problem with the hard drive or the Recovery partition was wiped out by the "tech service". Next thing to try would be to boot off the Linux DVD. Don't give up too quickly when booting off the disc; it takes a while to load into RAM & the screen may stay black for a minute before anything pops up.

One last thing - I pulled up the specs for the Aspire E5-575G & there are several sub-models. It appears they ALL have a conventional HDD & only a few have a SSD + HDD, so it's possible your HDD has failed. That might explain why HDD0 is blank.

https://www.acer.com/ac/en/AU/conte...

message edited by riider


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#14
December 24, 2017 at 06:53:07
Hi Riider and trvlr:

Thanks for the valuable assistance! My Acer does have an SSD drive, but apparently it may have another type of HDD as well. Yes, there is another number after the E5-575G to denote the Acer model subtype, but I don't have the computer with me now to specify. Thanks for looking at the specs for me. I am visiting relatives, but will be back at this tomorrow, or the day after Christmas. I will try the system re-set that Riider suggested, and also try the ubuntu OS again, and then the Linux Mint OS on a DVD, after making sure the boot 1 and 2 options are set to what you specified, and that I have "unzipped" the OS file on the DVD, not merely having copied it.

When doing the system reset per your instructions, is is necessary to take out the battery first? I saw you wrote that in an earlier post, and I can do it, it is just not a simple removal as the battery only comes out if you remove the back panel screws--not a simple latch.

Thanks for checking in on my progress--I truly appreciate the help. I don't want to call this a $600 plus loss (given the $110 repair fee I just paid) until I am sure it is a hardware issue, and that it will cost more to fix than the computer is worth. Right now I think there are a few more possible software fixes you wrote about that I can try--though both the Windows tech on the phone, and the local computer tech who worked on the laptop said after trying a lot of things that the failure to boot was hardware related. I will keep trying.

Please check back with me later on the results of what you suggested.

Happy Holidays!

Scott


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#15
December 24, 2017 at 15:41:27
These from ubunutu.com will guide you through making a bootable dvd and/or a bootable usb stick:

https://help.ubuntu.com/community/B...

https://tutorials.ubuntu.com/tutori...

message edited by trvlr


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#16
December 24, 2017 at 20:41:05
Just a note, a hardware problem might just be a bad hard drive or SSD drive which is not difficult to replace though you may have to reinstall Windows from scratch. If the operating system is on the SSD drive and your personal files are on the hard drive and it is the SSD drive that is bad, then after reinstalling the operating system on the new SSD drive, you will have full access to the personal files again.
Booting into Linux should show you what drives are accessible and we can continue from there.
This note is just so you know that a hardware problem is not necessarily the end of the machine or that it will cost you a fortune to restore it.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#17
December 26, 2017 at 08:30:17
Okay, so I burned ubuntu as a data dvd onto a blank DVD, using Express Burn. Express Burn verified that the disk was burned correctly.

I then took the burned DVD and inserted it into the defective Acer laptop. The number one option on my boot list was: ATAP1 CDROM: Slimtype DVD A DA8AESH". Option #2 was HDD1: LITEON Cv-1 8B256.

The same thing happens as did previously...The ACER logo appears briefly on startup, the DVD can be heard turning briefly after power on, and the cursor flashes in the top left of a blank screen...and nothing else happens...ten minutes later.

Also, this is after a computer technician tried to get it to boot working on it for several hours...said he tried everything, and also after I spent 4 hours on the phone with windows trying to get it to boot.

I guess I will now try the battery removal and Power button/ Alt F10 keys suggested by Riider.

I am close to giving up...as nothing seems to be able to get this computer to boot.

Any further suggestions are appreciated. Thanks. Scott


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#18
December 26, 2017 at 08:36:25
I also tried powering on the laptop while holding the Alt and F10 keys, as suggested by Riider. I waited to get the "please wait" after the ACER logo, but it still just brought me to the black screen with the flashing cursor in the top left hand corner. I haven't done it with battery removal first yet though.

Scott


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#19
December 26, 2017 at 09:10:39
"I burned ubuntu as a data dvd onto a blank DVD, using Express Burn"

I still recommend against Ubuntu as it's not nearly as easy to use as Mint (Mint is based on Ubuntu but more user friendly) but regardless, it has to be burned properly. If you pop the Ubuntu DVD into a different computer & check the contents of the disc, there should be multiple folders & files. Is that the case? If not, you'll have to try again using either CDBurnerXP or another program you can try is ImgBurn. Be sure to select "burn ISO image to disc", not "create data DVD".


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#20
December 26, 2017 at 21:11:45
That is the key, you need to "Burn ISO image to DVD disk" not burn data disk.
I have Nero on my computer and when I double click on the ISO Image file I get Nero launching and a windows that asks me the if I want to burn the ISO image to disk and to place a disk in the drive, then OK it. Depending on your burning software, you may have something similar when the program was installed, namely a default program when launching an ISO image (which is not a .exe so it cannot really launch but initiates a chain of events).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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