A Question of RAM

Double power / Em63k
May 30, 2014 at 17:33:36
Specs: Win 7, SP1, AMD 4130 FX+ 8/12 RAM
I just got a new computer (Yea!), built to my specs. Its an AMD QuadCore FX+, SSHD Hybrid drive, R7 260X with 2 GB DDR5, etc. Needing good graphics, I cheated on the other specs a bit, such as getting only 8 GB RAM, figuring I'd use 2 sticks of RAM from my old machine to bring it up to 12 GB.

According to the specs, the 8GB of RAM was DDR3 1333, which matched my old RAM speed as well. So here's the problem: the CASS latency was supposed to be 9's, operating at 1333 MHz. Instead, my machine now reads CASS latency of 11's, and a speed of only 668 MHz..

Assuming the memory was shipped as spec'd, could some mismatch between my 'old' memory and the new memory cause the reduction in speed? Perhaps the more important question is this: is it better to have the extra 4 GB of RAM (12 GB total) operating at 668 MHz, or have 8 MB operating at 1333 MHz?

Specific as well as theoretical answers appreciated.
Regards,
BearPup

message edited by BearPup


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#1
May 30, 2014 at 18:22:49
your best bet may be to go to crucial.com and use their scanner to see what is compatible with your pc....it's worth a try....

HELP in posting on Computing.net plus free progs and instructions


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#2
May 30, 2014 at 19:02:59
Thanks, but that's not what I'm asking. Sure, I can spend another $100 for another 8 GB of RAM, but that doesn't answer the question --

Which is better, 8 GB at 1333 MHz or 12 GB at 668 MHz?


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#3
May 31, 2014 at 01:59:36
Mixing RAM will generally run at the slower speed of the lesser specced module(s).

The best way to assess performance gain or loss is to run a benchmarking tool with and without the lower specced RAM modules.


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#4
May 31, 2014 at 06:33:33
BearPup wasn't suggesting that you go out and spend more money on RAM. What he was suggestion as that you use Crucial to find out exactly what you need.

A lot of people use Crucial to determine what kind of RAM they need then go and buy it elsewhere. As you already have all the RAM you need, it will confirm that you actually have the right specs you computer.

Base speed is not the only consideration, there are other factors that come into play, like CAS latency.

However, to answer your question as asked, 8Mb at 1333 MHz would be better. The benefit from the extra 4 Mb, even if it were running at the faster speed, would be minimal unless you are running some memory intensive application like Photo-shop or Video editing. 8 Mb is the sweet spot for windows 7. After than you start hitting the laws of diminishing returns

Stuart

message edited by StuartS


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#5
May 31, 2014 at 09:36:36
@StuartS: Thank you for your response. It directly responds to what I asked. And I'm aware of using Crucial (or Kingston, PNY, etc.) to get model numbers and the like. In my case I am using the MoBo manual so I know exactly what I need. My question was to ascertain whether more at a slower speed was better / worse than less at a faster speed.

As to needing more memory, I do slide editing, and have actually gotten an out of memory message when editing. My choices are as follows:

1) Do nothing and restart the computer when I get an out of memory message.
2) Keep it at 8 GB at the faster speed.
3) Grow it to 12 GB at the lower speed / higher latency.

I hear you opting for choice #2.

Thanks. Regards,
BearPup


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#6
June 1, 2014 at 16:56:45
I wouldn't have thought slide editing would require huge amounts of RAM. Makes me wonder if there is something awry with the program you are using.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#7
June 1, 2014 at 17:25:47
My camera shoots high def slides that are about 8MB apiece. I had loaded about 8 of them when I got the out of memory error. If memory serves me (so to speak), it was a Windows error message and not a program warning message. The program I was using, and my editor of choice, is MAGIX's Photo Designer 7, though I probably had a few other large programs running, such as my file manager, network sharing programs, etc. .

It is in fact the first and only time I've ever had that warning. Since I was purchasing a new computer anyway, I thought I'd make use of the 'old' memory from my last computer and save a little on my new rig. All memory passed mem86 testing, so I figured why not, especially as all memory is rated at 1333 MHz. So I'm perplexed as to why it shows all memory running at 668 MHz. Any ideas?


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#8
June 2, 2014 at 15:54:34
Seems weird. Might be interesting to remove the added RAM and see if it returns to 1333 MHz. If so try each additional stick one at a time to see if that tells you anything.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#9
June 2, 2014 at 16:19:49
I got the following info from Speccy (piriform.com):
Number Of SPD Modules 4
Slot #1
Type DDR3
Size 4096 MBytes
Manufacturer Team Group Inc.
Max Bandwidth PC3-10700 (667 MHz)
Part Number Team-Elite-1333
Week/year 01 / 14
Timing table
Frequency CAS# Latency RAS# To CAS# RAS# Precharge tRAS tRC Voltage
JEDEC #1 381.0 MHz 5.0 5 5 14 19 1.500 V
JEDEC #2 457.1 MHz 6.0 6 6 17 23 1.500 V
JEDEC #3 533.3 MHz 7.0 7 7 20 27 1.500 V
JEDEC #4 609.5 MHz 8.0 8 8 22 30 1.500 V
JEDEC #5 685.7 MHz 9.0 9 9 25 34 1.500 V
Slot #2
Type DDR3
Size 2048 MBytes
Manufacturer Unknown
Max Bandwidth PC3-10700 (667 MHz)
Timing table
Frequency CAS# Latency RAS# To CAS# RAS# Precharge tRAS tRC Voltage
JEDEC #1 457.1 MHz 6.0 6 6 17 23 1.500 V
JEDEC #2 533.3 MHz 7.0 7 7 20 27 1.500 V
JEDEC #3 609.5 MHz 8.0 8 8 22 30 1.500 V
JEDEC #4 685.7 MHz 9.0 9 9 25 34 1.500 V
Slot #3
Type DDR3
Size 4096 MBytes
Manufacturer Team Group Inc.
Max Bandwidth PC3-10700 (667 MHz)
Part Number Team-Elite-1333
Week/year 01 / 14
Timing table
Frequency CAS# Latency RAS# To CAS# RAS# Precharge tRAS tRC Voltage
JEDEC #1 381.0 MHz 5.0 5 5 14 19 1.500 V
JEDEC #2 457.1 MHz 6.0 6 6 17 23 1.500 V
JEDEC #3 533.3 MHz 7.0 7 7 20 27 1.500 V
JEDEC #4 609.5 MHz 8.0 8 8 22 30 1.500 V
JEDEC #5 685.7 MHz 9.0 9 9 25 34 1.500 V
Slot #4
Type DDR3
Size 2048 MBytes
Manufacturer Unknown
Max Bandwidth PC3-10700 (667 MHz)
Timing table
Frequency CAS# Latency RAS# To CAS# RAS# Precharge tRAS tRC Voltage
JEDEC #1 457.1 MHz 6.0 6 6 17 23 1.500 V
JEDEC #2 533.3 MHz 7.0 7 7 20 27 1.500 V
JEDEC #3 609.5 MHz 8.0 8 8 22 30 1.500 V
JEDEC #4 685.7 MHz 9.0 9 9 25 34 1.500 V

See anything I'm missing?


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