Solved 80GB Ext HDD is identified as unknown device error Code 43

June 13, 2012 at 03:39:51
Specs: Windows 7
Hey guys,

I started using a different laptop not long ago and every single time I plug in my External Hardrive, TOSHIBA MK8032GA (80 GB), a relic I know, I get a Windows Code 43 error and the device is named as an Unknown Device under USBs in Device Manager. I have tried everything from driver update to rebooting and playing with the registry but still no luck. I have read on a couple forums that Nvidia graphic cards are often the source of the problem and I have to admit on the laptop I was using before it had an ATI Radeon Graphics card and I never encountered this problem. Ironically from time to time depending on the computer's mood it will recognise it as an Ext-HDD and I can access my files. I checked which driver it used when it was successfully installed and that is the USBSTOR.sys and inf files. When it is classified as an Unkown device the driver installed is just usb.inf . I have searched drivers for this HDD but no success :( I have a CD but not on me right now :( so cant install it with the CD. I know for a fact that the HDD isn't corrupt since i reconfigured it with TestDisk the other day and then it worked but only for a day :P And also when I connect it to a different computer/laptop it work as well. Would really help if someone could shed some light on this problem :) .

TIA


See More: 80GB Ext HDD is identified as unknown device error Code 43

Report •

✔ Best Answer
June 14, 2012 at 09:23:11
Ok

I found a solution to my problem. Before going to buy a new USB cable i just made sure the one I was using now still worked and plugged my Ext-HDD in a desktop (Windows XP). In the space of 2 seconds my HDD was recognized no problem. So I was sure it wasn't the cable. Therefore I went back to my original suspicion about the Nvidia Graphics card. I went on the nvidia website downloaded the latest nvidia driver for my graphics card and installed it. Watch out here guys because windows had a 2010 driver installed and said it was up to date but on the website there had been releases in 2011 and 2012 so Windows failed. After a reboot plugged in my HDD and it was recognized in 2 seconds! NO MORE PROBLEMS! :D

So for you user who have a Nvidia graphics card make sure the drivers are up to date with the ones on the website because the driver installed on this computer was interefering with USB devices! Weird I know! :P

Thanks for the help guys :)



#1
June 13, 2012 at 04:22:56
The driver for all external hard drives is built in to Windows -- it's a generic driver by Microsoft (usbstor.sys). Therfore, searching around for a different driver is pointless and uneccessary.

see if this helps: http://support.microsoft.com/mats/h...


Report •

#2
June 13, 2012 at 06:13:31
Thanks for your quick reply phil22,

Ironically I was on that website yesterday and also downloaded the Windows Fixit thing but all I got out of it was the same as I knew before. It basically did a check on the driver which wasn't helpful since the driver installed for the unkown device is not the correct one for my ext-hdd and then basically told me it was an unknown device! I know that the right driver is the generic driver usbstor.sys the problem is that instead of installing that driver when I plug in the Harddrive windows installs the generic driver usb.inf and hence results in an unkown device. I have tried everything to try and install the unkown device with the generic driver usbstor.sys or inf but to no avail. Hence explaining my search for a different driver. But now I know I don't have to keep looking I just need to find a way for windows to recognize my HDD as a USB device and not a Unkown device.


Report •

#3
June 13, 2012 at 07:53:16
You don't need a specific driver, as already stated.
It's the external enclosure's circuits Windows detects - when they're detected correctly, the hard drive inside the external enclosure is detected correctly - neither needs specific drivers.

The external hard drive MUST be plugged into a USB port that can actually supply 500 ma of current. Even then, it may not be detected correctly when it's plugged into certain USB ports.

Troubleshooting USB device problems including for flash drives, external drives, external memory card readers.
See Response 1:
http://www.computing.net/answers/ha...
.....

In addition to the info there...

For some desktop mboards you can have problems when an external hard drive is plugged into one of a pair of USB ports on the back of the case that are connected to the same USB controller, if there is another device plugged into the other USB port for the pair, because the pair can't actually supply 500 ma per port - they can only supply 500 ma in total. Usually those pairs of ports are one above the other, not beside each other. If you have two devices plugged into such a pair of ports, try plugging one of them in elsewhere on the back of the computer.

For MANY laptop and netbook mboards similar applies. The built in USB ports often cannot actually supply 500 ma per port - they supply 500 ma in total for two ports that are close to each other. In that case, the external drive should work fine if it's the ony thing plugged into the USB ports built into the laptop or netbook, or if you have more than two ports, the only thing plugged into two ports close to each other.
.......

In other words, the external drive should be detected correctly when it's plugged into at least some USB ports, in at least some circumstances.

If it isn't detected properly, the only things left that could be wrong, assuming the USB cable came with the drive (if it didn't it may NOT be adequate) , are
- the circuits in the external enclosure are damaged,
- or - there's something wrong with the cable between the external drive and the USB port - try a different USB cable,
- or - there's something wrong with the USB port connection on the external drive.

The most frequent reason for the
- first and third of those is someone dropped the external enclosure.
- second of those is the cable was unplugged too often by pulling on the cord instead of the connector on the end of the cord, or the cable was yanked on.

If it isn't detected correctly because of any of those reasons, it won't be detected correctly by ANY computer.

New external hard drive enclosures are relatively cheap to buy.

The hard drive inside the external enclosure can be removed and connected to a computer one way or another such that you're not booting the other computer from the drive to check out whether it's still okay.
2.5 " hard drives are much more fragile than 3.5" hard drives and more likely to have been damaged if the external enclosure was dropped.



Report •

Related Solutions

#4
June 13, 2012 at 11:28:59
Thanks for your response Tubesandwires,

I have taken a look at all your references and I have found it very useful I have to admit the two ports are right next to each other and my Ipod is always plugged into the other. I tried taking out the Ipod and just putting in the Ext-HDD but still almost automatically this time (like .5 of a second) "Unknown Device" :( I have to admit that the hardrive (2.5") came with a usb cable with two usb ends and that sicne then that cable has broken and I have been using a normal A - B Usb Cable. However I have been using the new cable for at least 1 year now and I have never had a problem. I took the HDD with me in the plane and there was quite a bit of turbulence but that wouldn't cause the external enclosure to be broken would it? Also that still doesn't explain the couple times it worked on this computer like yesterday morning and then yesterday evening "Unkown Device". Do you perhaps have any other solutions?


Report •

#5
June 13, 2012 at 12:15:45
"Portable" external hard drives (that have one 2.5" hard drive inside of them) often come with a USB Y cable with two male type A USB connectors on the end for the computer because they know some USB ports, especially on laptops and netbooks, can't actually supply 500 ma per port.

The external drive enclosure can have one of several different types of USB port, but it's usually not type B which is the same as most USB printers use for a "portable" external hard drive, it's a physically smaller type of a different shape.

If the replacement cable allowed the external drive to be detected fine when plugged into one USB port all that time, it should still work with whatever port that was, unless the cable has been damaged, or the USB port is physically damaged but that's not likely to apply to more than one USB port at a time.

Try another USB cable if you have one, or buy another cable (you may be able to try it at the store with the drive plugged into a computer before you buy it). If that doesn't cure your problem either the external enclosure's circuits are damaged or the USB port on the external enclosure has a connection problem.

"Also that still doesn't explain the couple times it worked on this computer like yesterday morning and then yesterday evening "Unkown Device""

If you mean it is not detected as having been plugged in most of the time (you don't hear the dong-ding sound when you plug it in, the ding-dong when you unplug it), and when it is being detected as having been plugged in, all you get is "unknown" whatever, that sounds like a poor or faulty connection of some sort - for the former, a probem with the +5 v connection and it's ground; for the latter, maybe one of the two or both connections for data has a problem .

If it's SOMETIMES detected fine, then there's nothing wrong with the external enclosure's circuits.

The USB cable has 4 wires - for +5 v and it's ground, data + and data - , and the outer metal of the USB port is grounded, and usually the USB plug' s outer metal is grounded via the metal mesh in the outer part of the cable.


Report •

#6
June 13, 2012 at 13:42:46
Ok I shall try and acquire a new USB Cable and then I'll get back to you. Thanks a bunch for the help so far :)

Report •

#7
June 14, 2012 at 09:23:11
✔ Best Answer
Ok

I found a solution to my problem. Before going to buy a new USB cable i just made sure the one I was using now still worked and plugged my Ext-HDD in a desktop (Windows XP). In the space of 2 seconds my HDD was recognized no problem. So I was sure it wasn't the cable. Therefore I went back to my original suspicion about the Nvidia Graphics card. I went on the nvidia website downloaded the latest nvidia driver for my graphics card and installed it. Watch out here guys because windows had a 2010 driver installed and said it was up to date but on the website there had been releases in 2011 and 2012 so Windows failed. After a reboot plugged in my HDD and it was recognized in 2 seconds! NO MORE PROBLEMS! :D

So for you user who have a Nvidia graphics card make sure the drivers are up to date with the ones on the website because the driver installed on this computer was interefering with USB devices! Weird I know! :P

Thanks for the help guys :)


Report •

#8
June 14, 2012 at 22:08:13
We're glad to hear you solved your problem...

---but it's extremely unlikely the NVidia software had anything to do with that.


Report •

Ask Question