650 Watt over 750 Watt? Is More Better??

May 3, 2018 at 14:32:51
Specs: Windows 10
just wondering because originally I planned on getting 850 then downsized to 750 now wondering if that's really worth it. I don't plan on adding anything extra except ram so do I really need 750w inside my full sized tower? I'm running 7 fans and plan on overclocking, SLIGHTLY.

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#1
May 3, 2018 at 16:59:13
Most people get a PSU that can produce WAY more wattage that they'll ever need. Remember that the PSU will only produce what's required, so if your entire system only needs 300W but you buy an 850W PSU, it will only produce 300W. It doesn't produce 850W & then 550W goes to waste. The only advantage(s) to getting a larger PSU than needed is have a bit of a safety buffer & to allow for future upgrades. You don't want a 300W PSU for a 300W system because it will be running at 100% capacity, but a 450W or 500W should be plenty big enough. The important thing is to have the proper amperage specs. Get the amps right & the wattage will take care of itself.

The +3.3v & +5v rails are underused so there's really no need to have more than 20A on each. The +12v is the "big daddy" - it powers the CPU, the graphics card, HDDs, cooling fans - so it should have at least 32A. More would be better but there's no need to go crazy. 40A is about right.

Have a look at this & you'll see how much (or how little) wattage is needed by the various components.
http://www.buildcomputers.net/power...

I know you like to overspend so there's not much point in me making any PSU recommendations.

message edited by riider


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#2
May 3, 2018 at 20:01:35
its not that I want to "Over Spend" I just don't want a crappy psu or ANY OTHER Equipment in my rig is all. So thx for your suggestions but you don't have to leave anymore if you don't care for MY Choices I make on MY rig.

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#3
May 3, 2018 at 20:28:05
I could have recommended a great 500W PSU that's currently on sale for $20 after rebate, but I know you wouldn't even consider it. And you're right, I don't need to respond to your posts, thanks for pointing that out.

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#4
May 3, 2018 at 20:33:45
Right bc I would have looked it up seen bad reviews and not have cared about it like I did with a few of your other suggestions.

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#5
May 3, 2018 at 20:45:44
Try using hardware review sites (Tom's Hardware, jonnyguru, anandtech, techspot, etc) instead of youtube or user reviews written by people with little computer knowledge. I've been building & repairing computers for over 20 years, as have most of the other regular helpers in these forums. And I rarely recommend hardware that I wouldn't be willing to use myself.

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#6
May 3, 2018 at 22:06:47
I get my reviews mostly from amazon.

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#7
May 4, 2018 at 06:41:45

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#8
May 4, 2018 at 09:19:36
riider is arguably the most knowledgeable hardware helper here. If you click on a persons name here you will see their rank. Riider is currently #9.

One thing you didn't mention was was exact model PSU you were/are considering. That is probably more important than the wattage.

There is no way you ever need 7 case fans. Those fans are most likely fighting each other.

message edited by OtheHill


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#9
May 6, 2018 at 08:30:07
When it comes to case fans, no one ever bothers to do the math. The average tower case is about 18" x 18" x 8" (1.5' x 1.5' x .67'), which works out to about 1.5CF. The average 120mm case fan is usually rated at 50CFM or thereabouts. So that means a single case fan completely refreshes the air inside the case about 33 times per minute.

Now how many case fans do you think are needed?


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#10
May 6, 2018 at 16:21:00
Not trying to 'gang up' or anything (just trying to educate here)....
I find that for most standard non-overclocked systems a single 120mm to 140mm exhaust fan plus the power supply fan is plenty to cool the system case.
I find that for a heavily loaded gaming rig with one graphics card, two or more hard drives, reasonably high overclocking, and 24/7 usage (including bottom mounted power supplies), one or two exhaust fans at the top of the rear and rear of the top and one front intake fan low in the front is WAY more than anyone will ever need to the order of almost twice as much. Additional intake or exhaust fans do not help at all and side fans in any configuration disrupt the internal flow of air and cause eddies in the air flow that can leave hot spots within the case.
My system idles 25-28C, rarely goes over the low 40'sC, and has never gone beyond 52C @4.3GHz OC on air and could easily sustain 4.7GHz within 4 or 5C more.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#11
May 7, 2018 at 00:44:51
Oh it's cool I just appreciate all the feed I'm getting. Also I always was curious about why do ppl refer to computer temps in Celsius instead of Fahrenheit?

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#12
May 7, 2018 at 03:58:23
because only America&Canada? use Fahrenheit, the rest of the world uses Celsius, just like we use:

1000 Millimeter=1 Meter
1000 Meters=1 Kilometer: which are steps of 1000,

instead of:
12 inches= 1 feet
5280 feet= 1 mile: which are steps of 12, 5280, ....

i5-6600K[delid]@4.8GHz/4.4GHz@1.39v LLC=6 | 2x4GB Crucial-DDR4-2133CL15@14-13-13-28 1T 2800MHz@1.37v
MSI Armor RX 570 4GB@1420Mhz core@1.218v/1900MHz BiosModded


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#13
May 7, 2018 at 04:24:14
Also if you say 40C, you say OK, if you say 104F then you say 'isn't that hot' and start freaking out. You can convert it anytime you want but the numbers 'feel' better and for a computer, they are just fine. Once you know the range that is good, bad, and just OK, you are good with it and that is all that matters.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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