3-set dual-channel vs 2-set triple channel

September 2, 2010 at 13:27:47
Specs: Windows 7, i7
I see some 4Gx2 dual channel kits on sale. Can I buy 3 sets of those, to use as 2 sets of 4Gx3 triple channel kits, to get same result - since 3 sets of dual kit or 2 sets of triple should both translate to 6 pcs of identicle rams?

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#1
September 2, 2010 at 13:29:25
Does your mobo support triple channel?

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#2
September 2, 2010 at 13:34:51
yes. I currently have 12G run in triple channel. wanna upgrade to 24G

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#3
September 2, 2010 at 13:56:48
"currently have 12G run in triple channel. wanna upgrade to 24G"

What do you do with your system that would require you to have 24GB RAM? or even 12GB RAM for that matter....


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Related Solutions

#4
September 2, 2010 at 14:04:31
a lot of photoshop, as well as aftereffects. both eat menory

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#5
September 2, 2010 at 14:29:37
I've used photoshop 7.0 for years and have never had a problem with using all the memory. I have 4 gigs using xp pro. I'm not saying you're wrong, but I think you're being wrongly influenced.

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#6
September 2, 2010 at 14:36:29
I use cs4 64-bit version within windows7. i had 4g in 32-bit xp before upgraded to 64-bit and it even wouldn't open some files w/ many layers.

plus if you've been using aftereffects to render hours for only a couple of min of special effects...you'll know the pain.

since it costs more to upgrade cpu to 8-core, i'll go w/ memory.

can anybody answer my question, please?


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#7
September 2, 2010 at 15:12:15
I do graphics (photoshop 8), but photoshop cs4 is a memory killer. 12gb is alot, i think u need to manage your memory (disable some soft that u are not using).
Upgrade to core i7 xtreme? List the system specs.
Did u check memory usage in task manager?

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#8
September 2, 2010 at 15:14:57
To answer your question, if your board supports triple channel ram, go for it. I doubt you would see any difference between the 2 configurations, but the triple channel ram may be more economical for you.

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#9
September 2, 2010 at 15:34:38
The motherboard is what makes the RAM run in dual or triple channel mode. RAM itself is not dual or triple, it's just RAM. Someone familiar with RAM specs could go to store A & buy a stick of Corsair, go to store B & buy a stick of Kingston, go to store C & buy a stick of Crucial, then return home & run the 3 sticks in triple channel mode (on a board that supports triple channel mode, of course). Dual & triple channel RAM kits are sold to make it easier on people choose the proper memory for their system, that's all.

Anyhow, assuming your 12GB is DDR3-1333 at 667MHz frequency, a single 2GB stick has a theoretical max throughput (aka bandwidth) of 10,600 MB/sec. If you put two sticks in dual channel mode, the max bandwidth doubles to 21,200 MB/sec. And if you run 3 sticks in triple channel mode, the max bandwidth is 31,800 MB/sec.

In all 3 cases, the RAM runs at exactly the same speed, the only difference is the amount of data that can be theroretically pushed through the pipe at that speed. I highly doubt you're maxing out 12GB RAM, doubling it to 24GB is just a waste of money. But hey, it's your money....


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#10
September 2, 2010 at 16:19:23
Thanks jam, that's what I assumed, just wanna make sure!

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