3 tb hard drive only uses 746g on Win7 AMD pc

Dell / GX280
July 22, 2014 at 18:14:38
Specs: Windows 7, 2.53Ghz, 2gb ram
I just purchased a 3 TB western digital Green drive that I want to install internally on my Windows 7 machine with an AMD chip. For some reason the drive only shows 746 GB after formatting.

How do I get it to show all 3 TB?


See More: 3 tb hard drive only uses 746g on Win7 AMD pc

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#1
July 22, 2014 at 18:28:40
Does the drive show full capacity in BIOS?

Does the drive show full capacity in Windows Disk Manager?

What file system did you use when you formatted the drive?

Is the drive GPT or MBR?

What is the default block size of the drive?

Did you perform a 'Quick Format' or a full format?

Are you sure you didn't create a second partition on accident?

3 TB is actually 2.75 TB, so if you had a 2 TB partition this could leave the 746 GB.

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#2
July 22, 2014 at 20:15:01
If you have not put anything on it yet, open Disk Manager, delete the entire partition so that the entire drive shows as raw. Right click on the drive in Disk Manager and select 'create a new volume'. Then in the wizard, initialize the disk as GPT (MBR has a limit of a little over 2GB as well as other limitations) and format it to NTFS, leaving the default recommended partition size (if you want one continuous partition spanning the entire drive). Quick Format is just fine for a new hard drive and it will save you hours waiting for it to format (as in Full Format).

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#3
July 22, 2014 at 22:07:55
Does your PC recognize that large of a drive?

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#4
July 23, 2014 at 09:58:32
Please ignore - response already covered.

message edited by Derek


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#5
July 23, 2014 at 16:09:34
Windows 7 should not have a problem with the size of the drive, but it needs to be set up as GPT, not MBR since MBR does not work for drives of that size. As long as the BIOS recognizes the full size of the drive, he is all set.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#6
July 23, 2014 at 18:27:56
When I look at the drive in Disk Manager it still shows 746gb. How do I check the BIOS settings?

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#7
July 23, 2014 at 18:31:27
First we need either the make and model of your computer or your motherboard.

This is usually done by pressing F2, F10, or something like that. It varies from computer to computer, so I would consult your manual.

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#8
July 23, 2014 at 18:56:29
I looked at the BIOS for the drive and it shows 3000 gb (3 tb).

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#9
July 23, 2014 at 19:08:50
Did a bit more research, and I saw a person having a similar problem as you.

Apparently, some drives simulate a 512 Byte sector size, when they actually (physically) use the 4096 Byte format.

Their OS (some form of Linux) was recognizing it as 512/512 Logical/Physical rather than the 512/4096 Logical/Physical it should have been.

Sadly, they didn't have an actual solution to the problem, so I suppose it really won't help much.

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#10
July 23, 2014 at 19:26:48
Yes. It's strange that disk manager is showing 746gb while the BIOS is showing 3 tb. I guess I will have to use the drive as an external.

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#11
July 23, 2014 at 19:48:23
As stated above, you could try reformatting the drive to have a GUID Partition Table (unless you already did this).

This would allow you to have a bit more than 19 Zettabytes, which should be enough to suit your needs for a while.

Though I believe most modern drives have a physical 4096 Byte sector size to correct the 2 TB issue with MBR...effectively expanding it's maximum capacity to ~16 TB.

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