Solved 3½ & 5¼-inches drives quit working on exit from BIOS

September 4, 2015 at 17:39:59
Specs: 386 processor
running a 386 motherboard with amibios 1992. By accident got into bios setup and exited without noticing any change but afterwords A: drive (5-1/4) and B: drive (3.5)
quite working and I get the message:
Current drive is no longer valid when I try and read from these devices.
The bios setting now say A:drive and B:drive
"not installed but they worked perfectly before this incident.
Can't figur out WHY A; and B; quit working?
any advice appreciated.
Please don't tell me to scrap the machine I use it often to read older floppy disk I have around and it is very handy.
Thanks.......kent

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✔ Best Answer
September 5, 2015 at 10:11:26
Hello all and thanks for the responses. Yes I got the A: and B: drive back and here is how I did it.

When I went in the BIOS settings I could not change anything about the A; and B: drive this seemed funny.

Also, the current date showing in the bios was 5-19-2005, so I figured the clock battery dead and need to change it.

Went on to try several other things suggested...no response.

Today, I went back into BIOS and the date read 5-20-2005. Wow, this told me the battery was NOT dead even though its been in since 1992. Go figure.

Now I am no spring chicken...I have been around for some time and in the recesses of my little grey cells I remembered something about Heat Creep where after so many years pc components which fit into sockets will loosen and try to come out of the socket ....so I figured the controller card must have done that. I pulled it and it was in REAL tight. However, when I pulled the card I could then clearly see the ami bios chip next to it and it was also in a socket so I pushed down on it. Bingo...it snaped down into the socket from about half way out. You can guess what happened next...I put it all back together and booted up to A: and B: drive working.
Had I not remembered about that heat creep I would never have pulled the controller card and never seen the ami bios chip.

So there it is for anyone in the future who may have a similar problem.

I want to thank everyone who responded, the time when your in doubt and you know someone is there who will try and help is the difference between success and failure and I credit everyones response as an "assist" for me finding the final solution.

Thank you all........Kent



#1
September 4, 2015 at 17:54:47
In BIOS can their "Not Installed" settings be changed to "Installed"?
(or it might be Disabled > Enabled)

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#2
September 4, 2015 at 18:40:22
Any "Default" setting possible in BIOS?

If you want to keep data from the "old" floppy disks it is about time to copy it to a newer media. It will not last forever.
What OS are you running?


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#3
September 4, 2015 at 18:42:37
You generally had to choose which drive was the A and which the B. Additionally, there were multiple capacities of each size. A drive was normally assigned to the 5 1/4 - 1.2MB. The B could be 720KB or 1.44MB. Some drive could read both capacities.

As Derek mentioned above the drives or controller may be disabled or the type of drive or capacity may be set wrong.


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Related Solutions

#4
September 5, 2015 at 07:01:21
Could it be the motherboard battery finally went bad & all the BIOS settings reset to their defaults? Do you ever shutdown the system & kill the power to it? Even if the battery is bad, the BIOS settings will be retained until the power is cut. Once that happens, deafults are loaded. Check the day/date.

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#5
September 5, 2015 at 07:02:02
Hi Kent,

sometimes disks are referred to and set up involving two different bios 'pages'.

e.g. on one you set the disk format, on another you enable or disable.

Good Luck - Keep us posted.


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#6
September 5, 2015 at 10:11:26
✔ Best Answer
Hello all and thanks for the responses. Yes I got the A: and B: drive back and here is how I did it.

When I went in the BIOS settings I could not change anything about the A; and B: drive this seemed funny.

Also, the current date showing in the bios was 5-19-2005, so I figured the clock battery dead and need to change it.

Went on to try several other things suggested...no response.

Today, I went back into BIOS and the date read 5-20-2005. Wow, this told me the battery was NOT dead even though its been in since 1992. Go figure.

Now I am no spring chicken...I have been around for some time and in the recesses of my little grey cells I remembered something about Heat Creep where after so many years pc components which fit into sockets will loosen and try to come out of the socket ....so I figured the controller card must have done that. I pulled it and it was in REAL tight. However, when I pulled the card I could then clearly see the ami bios chip next to it and it was also in a socket so I pushed down on it. Bingo...it snaped down into the socket from about half way out. You can guess what happened next...I put it all back together and booted up to A: and B: drive working.
Had I not remembered about that heat creep I would never have pulled the controller card and never seen the ami bios chip.

So there it is for anyone in the future who may have a similar problem.

I want to thank everyone who responded, the time when your in doubt and you know someone is there who will try and help is the difference between success and failure and I credit everyones response as an "assist" for me finding the final solution.

Thank you all........Kent


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#7
September 5, 2015 at 18:04:50
Thanks for getting back to us with the fix. It may help someone in the future.

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#8
September 6, 2015 at 01:07:05
You still ought to change the battery or at least check its voltage. A dead battery will cause the date to revert to the bios creation date or 1-1-1980, depending on the system. A weak battery will lose time and only get worse. Unless the time was deliberately changed it's already lost 10 years.

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