137GB limitation--disk crash

Wd Caviar se 200gb hard drive
February 21, 2010 at 18:19:46
Specs: Windows XP
In late 2005, while running Win2K, I bought a
new WD Caviar SE 200GB drive. When I got it
home and formatted it, I noticed it only showed
as a 137GB drive. I took it back to the dealer
who said. "No problem, we'll format it on our
machine running XP and it will be fine". When I
got it home it showed 186GB and I used the
disk for a few months and all was well, until
the disk filled past 137GB while writing a DVD.
Suddenly the drive started spewing out error
messages. I was then told to do a chkdsk.
After running this, the drive no longer appeared
to contain any files or folders but was still
recognised by the computer. I then attempted
to run a number of data recovery programs
which found loads of files but could not identify
the MBR or the backup MBR. I have since
attempted recovery on a new computer using
new tools and running on XP with all the
latests updates and SPs but have still not
been successful in recovering any of the data.

Any ideas?

Many thanks in advance for your kind
assistance.

Rob


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#1
February 21, 2010 at 18:21:19
CORRECTION TO ABOVE POST: Should have said: "While
running Win2K"

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#2
February 21, 2010 at 18:31:11
http://support.microsoft.com/defaul...

This aids with Win2K handling 48-bit LBA, but your motherboard must also support it...


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#3
March 2, 2010 at 02:51:37
Thanks for the reply...Unfortunately, it applies only to a situation
BEFORE the disk has crashed. Anyone have an idea how
to recover the MBR and FAT and data once the disk has crashed
and both the MBR and FAT as well as both backups have
become corrupted?

Cheers,

Rob


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#4
March 2, 2010 at 07:51:05
"When I got it home and formatted it, I noticed it only showed
as a 137GB drive. I took it back to the dealer
who said. "No problem, we'll format it on our
machine running XP and it will be fine". When I got it home it showed 186GB ..."

2000 must have SP4 or later updates installed (and XP must have SP1 or later updates installed) in order for it to be able to recognize a hard drive or a partition larger than 137gb manufacturer's (decimal) size ( = 128gb binary size in the bios and in the operating system ) as it's full size, as well as the mboard's bios being required to be able recognize the full size of the drive.

If the CD you use to install Windows when you boot from it does NOT have SP4 or later updates included on it for 2000, or does NOT have SP1 or later updates included on it for XP, Setup will see the size of any drive larger than 137gb manufacturer's (decima) size as 128gb (131,072mb), it can't make a single partition any larger than that, and the remainder of the drive capacity is not seen and is not used in Windows.

If you have a hard drive larger than 137gb manufacturer's (decimal) size, and if your CD does not have the required minimum or higher SP updates included, you can make yourself a "slipstreamed" CD, preferably a CD-R, that has had the latest SP updates integrated into the original data contents of your CD, and use that instead of your original CD, along with your original Product Key, to install Windows with.

~200gb manufacturer's (decimal) size = ~186.26gb (binary) size, in the mboard's bios, and that is = to the "RAW" size of the whole hard drive in Disk Management in Windows. Software partitioning and formatting use up a small precentage of that ~186.26gb , so, e.g. if the hard drive has only one partition, the total size of the C partition in My Computer or Windows Explorer is smaller than that.
......

If you use a hard drive that has had Windows installed on it from a CD that had 2000 SP4 or later updates included, or XP SP1 or later updates included, in an operating that does not have the minmum required SP updates installed in it, Disk Management and Windows will see only a max 128gb (binary) size, you may have problems accessing the data on the partition, and you may have problems getting the partition Windows was installed on to boot at all.
......

"...all was well, until the disk filled past 137GB..."

If the full size of the drive is/was shown in Disk Management, your exceeding using 137gb of the partition capacity in Windows has nothing to do with your problem.

Probably, either
- you have a data cable problem,
- or - your hard drive is failing.

It is common to un-intentionally damage IDE data cables, especially while removing them - the 80 wire ones are more likely to be damaged. What usually happens is the cable is ripped at either edge and the wires there are either damaged or severed, often right at a connector or under it's cable clamp there, where it's hard to see - if a wire is severed but it's ends are touching, the connection is intermittant, rather than being reliable.
Another common thing is for the data cable to be separated from the connector contacts a bit after you have removed a cable - there should be no gap between the data cable and the connector - if there is press the cable against the connector to eliminate the gap.
80 wire data cables are also easily damaged at either edge if the cable is sharply creased at a fold in the cable.

Try another data cable if in doubt.


Check your SATA data cables. The connector on each end should "latch" into the socket on the drive and on the mboard, or on the drive controller card - it should not move when you merely brush your hand against it near the socket - if it does, mere vibration can cause a poor connection of it - use another SATA data cable that does "latch", or tape the connector in place.
(There is a slight projection or bump on one side of the outside of the connector that "latches" it into the socket - it's easily broken off or damaged)

The same thing applies for the SATA power connection.

Check your hard drive with the manufacturer's diagnostics.
See the latter part of response 1 in this:
http://www.computing.net/windows95/...

(thanks to Dan Penny for this link:)
Hard Drive Diagnostics Tools and Utilities
http://www.tacktech.com/display.cfm...

If you don't have a floppy drive, you can get a CD image diagnostic utility from most hard drive manufacturer's web sites, but obviously you would need to make a burned CD, preferably a CD-R for best compatibilty, on another computer if you need to.

If the hard drive itself tests okay, any data problems found can be fixed, one way or another.
........

NOTE that if your WD drive is IDE, many WD models have two ways you can set them to Master on the back of the drive itself - Master (single) or similar, for when it is by itself on a data cable, or Master (with Slave), or similar, for when there is a drive set to Slave on the same data cable.
If the drive is by itself on a data cable, yiou must use the Master (single), or similar, setting (or CS - cable select - and the drive should be on the end connector on a 3 connector data cable)
If you have a drive set to Slave on the same data cable, you must use the Master ( with Slave), or similar, setting, for the WD drive,
or set the WD drive to Slave, the other drive to Master
(or you could set both drives to CS - cable select - the drive connected to the middle connector on a 3 connector data cable is seen as slave, the drive connected to the end connectir on a 3 connector data cable is seen as master).



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#5
March 2, 2010 at 13:03:16
"No problem, we'll format it on our machine running XP and it will be fine".

Wrong, as you found out. I would suggest pulling the drive, attaching it externally to another system and using a file recovery program to see if you can save your data.


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