Solved So many video cards, such little know how....

April 2, 2012 at 14:57:44
Specs: Windows 7
I need a graphics card. I know how to physically install it but, that's about it. I want to be able to play Skyrim, Star Wars: The Old Republic, and World of Warcraft (or any other games for windows) on the highest graphic settings possible. Or at least as high as they can get for under 200 dollars. And, I don't want to have to buy a power supply either. Here are my computer details:

Windows 7 Ultimate 64 Bit OS
AMD Phenom II X4 820 Processor 2.8GHZ (quad core)
NVIDIA nForce 720a Chipset
8GB DDR3 RAM (4 2GB cards) (Windows says only 7.75 usable)
NVIDIA GeForce 9100 GPU (onboard)
One PCI Express x16 graphics slot
Power Supply 300 Watt

HP Pavillion Specs


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✔ Best Answer
April 3, 2012 at 15:26:40
It's not so much about wattage as it is about the amperage available on the +12v rail. There aren't many 300W PSUs (even good ones) that have enough amperage to run a modern high end gaming card. You're going to have to replace both the PSU & video card if you want a reliable gaming rig. You can easily do it for under $200.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...



#1
April 2, 2012 at 15:59:43
The 300W PSU is gonna hold you back:

Best Graphics Cards For The Money: March 2012


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#2
April 2, 2012 at 16:59:31
Check to see if a second nvida card could use the onboard graphic engine.

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#3
April 3, 2012 at 10:33:46
How can I find out how many watt's my power supply has to spare when my pc is running at max speed? (so i can figure out which card will work)

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#4
April 3, 2012 at 15:26:40
✔ Best Answer
It's not so much about wattage as it is about the amperage available on the +12v rail. There aren't many 300W PSUs (even good ones) that have enough amperage to run a modern high end gaming card. You're going to have to replace both the PSU & video card if you want a reliable gaming rig. You can easily do it for under $200.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...


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#5
April 4, 2012 at 00:06:18
Thank you! One more question, what does the difference in clock mhz mean on the different GPU's? i.e.(Core, Shader, Effective Memory) My computer has its own clock speed in mhz right? So, is it the bigger the better or should it be closer to my own pc clock speed? or does it just relate to overclocking?

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#6
April 4, 2012 at 17:11:38
The CPU has it's clock speed, the GPU has it's clock speed. They are totally separate from each other. Same goes for memory. Your motherboard uses DDR3, the video card (if you get a good one) uses GDDR5 graphics memory. They are also totally separate from each other. Generally, the higher the clock speed, the better. The higher the memory speed, the better. The wider the memory buswidth, the better.

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