Solved No Bootable Device after swapping hard drive

August 21, 2015 at 14:58:06
Specs: Windows 10
Sorry if this is in the wrong thread, this is my first time here.

I have two HP laptops. One, whose screen is broken, is an HP G7-2323dx — this is the computer I've been using, and after the screen and bottom casing broke I simply hooked it up to a monitor via an HMDI cable (inconvenient but it worked fine). The G7 is running Windows 10, and I used it without issues until this morning. The other, an older one I stopped using because the hard drive died, is an HP G72-227WM. The G72 was running Windows 7 when the hard drive actually worked.

It didn't occur to me until last night that I could simple swap over the hard drive from the computer I currently use, over to the computer that I don't use. So that's precisely what I did this morning.

I figured I'd be able to boot it up as normal, but apparently not as I get the message "No Bootable Device". I'm not extremely tech savvy, but I know I can completely move all the internals of the first laptop over into the second laptop and it'd theoretically work, since it's essentially just changing the casing of the laptop. I'd really like to avoid that grunt work, though, so how would I go about moving beyond the error message I'm receiving?


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✔ Best Answer
August 22, 2015 at 01:13:44
Two approaches.

One is to connect the hard drive via a usb adapter to a working computer, and then you can access its contents. Then copy all your files to dvd at least. If possible another external hard drive too is nice(r). Check the copies are accessible.

Other approach. Download and burn to a dvd the ubuntu ISO - ubuntu.com. Ubuntu is a free Linux variant.. With the drive installed in a computer, boot that computer with the ubuntu dvd. It will load into RAM only,unless you tell it to install to the current hard drive - which do not.

It will boot etc. to a typical desktop, and then you can access the hard drive - now just a resource for ubuntu; and again copy files to dvd as above.

message edited by trvlr



#1
August 21, 2015 at 15:06:29
You can't just do that drive swap unless the two computers are "identical".

When an operating system is initially installed it is set up against the hardware that it sees. If you suddenly shift the HD to another computer it will no longer understand what it is seeing and all sorts of issues will arise. The registry entries will be quite wrong for starters.

You could also run in to "Windows Genuine" issues as your software and hardware relationship comes into that equation too. At a minimum you'll have a discrepancy to sort out with MS.

You need to move the motherboard with the hard disk, at least.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks

message edited by Derek


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#2
August 21, 2015 at 16:21:01
Is there anything on the. Hard drive in question that you'd like save? Personals etc?

If so post back for few suggestions re' acccessing them and duplicating/copying them to external storage. Typically this would be to DVD, but to an external hard drive nice(r) as well - if possible


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#3
August 21, 2015 at 20:01:13
Yes, I have personal files/photos on the hard drive, most not backed up.

I also have an external hard drive.


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#4
August 22, 2015 at 01:13:44
✔ Best Answer
Two approaches.

One is to connect the hard drive via a usb adapter to a working computer, and then you can access its contents. Then copy all your files to dvd at least. If possible another external hard drive too is nice(r). Check the copies are accessible.

Other approach. Download and burn to a dvd the ubuntu ISO - ubuntu.com. Ubuntu is a free Linux variant.. With the drive installed in a computer, boot that computer with the ubuntu dvd. It will load into RAM only,unless you tell it to install to the current hard drive - which do not.

It will boot etc. to a typical desktop, and then you can access the hard drive - now just a resource for ubuntu; and again copy files to dvd as above.

message edited by trvlr


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#5
August 22, 2015 at 01:14:11
It's probable that one computer has a GPT partitioned drive that needs to be booted via UEFI whereas the other has an MBR drive that needs to be booted via conventional BIOS.

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#6
August 22, 2015 at 16:01:40
@ijack - I understood none of that. Not tech savvy, sorry.


@trvlr
I bought a "StarTech USB 3.0 to 2.5" SATA III Hard Drive Adapter Cable with UASP" which should come on Tuesday evening. When it comes I will do just as you have suggested: connect the HDD to my desktop via usb, connect my 4tb external hard drive to the desktop, and move everything from the HDD to the External. Then I will eject both of them, then reconnect the external to make sure everything is transferred over to it FOR SURE.

What would the next step after that be?


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#7
August 22, 2015 at 16:40:06
Prior to win-10 on the G7 what was the OS it (the G7) was running?

How did you install win-10; an upgrade routine, or a clean install?

My first thought is that it "might" be possible to run a Repair installation (much as one can for XP and I think win-7 and maybe even win-8x?). This process in effect re-installs the OS over itself and rewrite/corrects assorted registry entries that at present (and in your situation) are wrong with the drive in its "new" home... I'm not at all familiar with win-10 so have no idea if that's viable or not.

This link suggests a method that works for win-7/win-8x (and it "may"work with win-10)?

http://www.mindworkshop.info/window...

It's quite lengthy a read; and does strongly advise making a clone of the current windows OS (in your case win-10). I haven't tried this method so can't advise on it's efficacy or how "easy" (or not) it is to do...

If your win-10 is OEM then it cannot be used to install/run "that" installation (actually its OEM key) on another system. But if you have a Retail version, then that is (usually) transferable (at least it is with XP/win-7/win-8x). OEM keys are tied to the motherboard from/with which it was registered/activated. Retail are not so tied...

What style of win-10 do you have; OEM or Retail?


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#8
August 22, 2015 at 17:15:36
The G7 originally ran Win8, but right before the screen busted I updated it to Win10. I updated it via the free link on the Microsoft website:

https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/sof...

Honestly I'm not very technical with OS changes, but the only discernible difference between Win8 and Win10 was they added the start button back, so I think based off of what you're saying, since it works in 8 it would probably work in 10, but I guess I'll only know once I actually am able to do it.

Anyways, I didn't put Win10 on a disc or USB, but directly onto the computer itself. So I could probably just go back to that link and put it into a disc this time, then use that as the clone.

I skimmed over the link and it seems easy enough to follow.

Also, thank you for taking the time to help me out on this. I really do appreciate it.


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