Solved Why does a access denied message come up when del a file?

November 24, 2014 at 14:37:10
Specs: MSDOS 3.2
I have an old Amstrad PC1512 running DOS 3.2. When I try to delete a file from the hard drive I get a "General Failure error writing drive c" message. When I hit "Ignore" I get an "Access Denied" message. How do I unprotect the c drive so I can delete files?

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✔ Best Answer
November 24, 2014 at 20:20:59
The 'general failure. . . ' message implies a physical problem with the drive but do a attrib filename in the directory in which the file resides to see what attributes apply. If it is a read-only then attrib -r filename

If it's not the read only attribute then there's a bad spot on the hard drive or possibly the drive isn't identified right in cmos/bios setup.

Or is there any old norton stuff running on the drive (check config.sys and autoexec.bat)? Seems like norton utilities had some security measures you could run.

Is this with every file? Try creating a file--you'd use EDLIN with 3.2, I think--and then see if you can delete it.



#1
November 24, 2014 at 14:56:54
Sounds like the hard drive is shot. Hardly surprising after all these years.

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#2
November 24, 2014 at 15:33:09
In DOS such an error could be caused by a file with read only attributes. Check with the attrib command. A failing hard drive can produce a wide variety of errors.

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#3
November 24, 2014 at 15:34:36
But the computer boots up and runs all programs no problem including Lotus 123, DBase lll, games, etc. There must be a protection somewhere that I can't remember how to remove m

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#4
November 24, 2014 at 15:37:19
I checked the read only attributes and that doesn't seem to work. I may be putting in the wrong syntax after all these years but ATTRIB doesn't seem to address the problem.

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#5
November 24, 2014 at 20:20:59
✔ Best Answer
The 'general failure. . . ' message implies a physical problem with the drive but do a attrib filename in the directory in which the file resides to see what attributes apply. If it is a read-only then attrib -r filename

If it's not the read only attribute then there's a bad spot on the hard drive or possibly the drive isn't identified right in cmos/bios setup.

Or is there any old norton stuff running on the drive (check config.sys and autoexec.bat)? Seems like norton utilities had some security measures you could run.

Is this with every file? Try creating a file--you'd use EDLIN with 3.2, I think--and then see if you can delete it.


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#6
November 25, 2014 at 00:54:16
Follow up on the last paragraph from #5.

Easiest way to create a file, since EDLIN isn't very user friendy, may be to create it directly from the keyboard. If you were to copy an already existing file, it may carry some already existing problems to the copy.

COPY CON <filename.ext>
<Insert some ramdom text>
F6 <- Inserts an End of File marker and exits the copy command

Now you have a fresh file to try to delete, as DAVEINCAPS suggested.


Nigel

Wind slow


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#7
November 25, 2014 at 15:57:54
@DAVEINCAPS - your suggestion worked. I naut have had the wrong syntax for attrib and when I used your recommendation I was able to change the attribute and delete the file. THANKS!!!!!!!!

Dale


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#8
November 25, 2014 at 17:39:56
You're welcome. I'm glad it worked but I still wonder about the 'general failure. . . ' message that came up first. You might want to run CHKDSK and see what it reports. Don't do CHKDSK/F as that will 'fix' any problems it finds and usually makes any files it fixes unusable.

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#9
November 26, 2014 at 08:02:42
I ran CHKDSK and got the following:

Errors found, F parameter not specified
Corrections will not be written to disk

C:BackslashPWBackslashAD
First cluster number is invalid,
entry truncated

87 lost clusters found in 37 chains
Convert lost chains to files? (Y/N)


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#10
November 26, 2014 at 11:02:55
I had thought the drive might be configured wrong in bios setup but that computer has the 8086 cpu in it so I don't think it has a system bios setup. The hard drive is configured using the controller card it's attached to.

My guess is the drive has some bad spots on it. Dos 3.2 doesn't have scandisk to find and mark bad spots. You'd have to use something like norton disk doctor (NDD.EXE) from an old norton utilities or reformat the drive and then reinstall dos and your other software. Even if you ran NDD, any file it found occupying a spot it marked bad would likely be corrupted. Reformatting would mark the spot as bad before any software was installed so the system would run OK, at least until more bad spots appeared.

For now you might was well go ahead and 'convert lost chains to files'. I think that does the same thing as if you did CHKDSK/F. The lost chains are parts of files it's lost track of and can't really be re-assembled. Depending on which files are affected your system may run OK. You'll just have to work with it for awhile and see how it goes.


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