Solved does anybody out there still use ms dos

July 7, 2011 at 21:29:09
Specs: MS DOS, Celeron / 512 KB
No, I'm not having any particular problem. I use MSDOS on embedded control systems for semiconductor processing equipment; I just find it convenient and simple to use serial ports and interrupts and fun hardware-y stuff like that using MS C++ compiler v8.0. And yes, I make my living doing this. Does anybody out there seriously use DOS for productive purposes? Someone tell me I am actually the last one!!

Dossasaurus REX


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#1
July 8, 2011 at 02:35:45
Good news! You are not the last DOSman on Earth. Other people survived Windows/GUI plague. I still use DOS in a virtual machine to run legacy production applications for shift planning and math computations.

However you can look at me as a mutant since I prefer to run FreeDOS, the Open Source DOS clone, because it supports FAT32 and has a lot of tools for interfacing up to date devices (USB, WiFi...). More it is free and 99% compatible with MS DOS.


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#2
July 8, 2011 at 19:13:10
You are not alone! I run true MS DOS 6.2.0, not FreeDOS on a standalone system, not Virtual. I agree with you, I like the C++ compiler for DOS better than Code::Blocks as all you do is type code and click (or direct to, I have no mouse on the comp) on Compile. (Forgot the correct name on the button, haven't used it this week) I work at the county property manager's office where i live, and i'm still using the original DOS 6.2.0 386-based comp that the county upgraded to from typewriters and white-out in 1993. I only use the C++ compiler for making simple games such as my "Guess It" game, but i do that on my 486 at home. I also have an DOS 4 286-based computer thrown in the attic, but the HDD decided to retire in 2007. Anyway, I have a win 2000 computer that my i got as a christmas present from my dad, but I only use it because it's easier to hook it up to the internet than my 486. Otherwise, i have sworn off GUI's exept for the damned ATM at Wal-Mart. If you need (Or want for an upgrade) a copy of the DOS 6.2 disks go ahead and PM me.

Further edit: FreeDOS doesn't work with Win 3.1. I borrowed some Win 3.1 disks from a co-worker to try FreeDOS on a rebuild sys, but it won't accept it. I only wanted to try FreeDOS because it has .ZIP support to fit more on floppies.

If god is a programmer, he better use DOS 6 for me!


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#3
July 8, 2011 at 21:22:22
✔ Best Answer
There's still a lot of industrial-control equipment still running on DOS. And given the current state of the economy, a lot of that equipment will still be around for quite a while.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#4
July 9, 2011 at 05:58:29
Thanks, all of you.
I also use DOS 6.22, standalone systems; they're just so easy and reliable! The few Windows apps I made in Visual C++ were really neat, but so much work to get running right!

T-R-A -- I also have a lot of mission-critical equipment at work running DOS, on processes that will ruin $$ product if it fails. The Windows OS's primarily run metrology devices that can simply be re-run if a measurement fails. (That stuff has gotten a lot more reliable since WinXP)

Come to think of it, we don't have a single piece of production(non-metrology) equipment running Windows! It's all either DOS or some sort of PLC.

Anyway, thanks for the responses, glad I signed up..

m


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#5
July 9, 2011 at 17:09:33
DossasaurusRex,

Just curious. What do you use to backup your data. In a former job, I upgraded all the equipment from MS-Dos to IBM PC-DOS 2000 and it worked great. We were concerned with backing up the data and any DOS Y2K compliance issues (this was in 1999). The included Central Point Backup software saved our butts when we lost an old MFM hard-drive (20 MB). Swapped out to a 40 MB drive and we were back up and running in under an hour.

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#6
July 10, 2011 at 04:49:47
T-R-A -

We keep these systems on the LAN, and run MSCLIENT. As each production cycle ends the control program copies logged data to a file server. After that its backed up daily to tape drive by the IT guys.

It's interesting you mentioned Y2K compliance. Back in '99 we installed protection software on all of our systems like everyone else did. I forget which kind. We never saw anything more than 1 minor issue arise, and over the years we've stopped running that software. The only thing we ever see related to Y2K is when looking at the dates of files, the date is correct but the day of the week is off by one day. My understanding is that 2000 was a leap year, when usually years ending in 00 leap year is skipped. This caused the day of the week calculation to be off for all dates after 2/28/2000. I can't find a reason to care about this.

Did you see any Y2K effects?


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#7
July 10, 2011 at 16:20:48
"Did you see any Y2K effects?"

No, and given what we were doing, it wouldn't have much mattered if we had. These were older 286 and newer 486/P-I (CPU) surface-mount adhesive-dispense machines that still ran on DOS (the 20MB machine was actually a 286). Like everyone else, we fell for the Y2K hype, but I did my part to make sure we were ready, just in case...

The ability to backup so easily was what sold me on PC DOS 2K. Took about 10 floppies per machine, but was extremely easy for a "DOS-guy" like me. We had no network connections to these machines, and they were the SMT Process department's (where I worked) responsibility, since IT never wanted to get involved with such older machines.


"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#8
July 14, 2011 at 23:34:24
Yes, I use a Brother Geobook NB-60. Mostly for word processing (Word 5.5, GEM and Flexpad). In addition to GEOS it has DOS 6.22 on ROM. No hard drive, 4Mb memory and a PCMCIA flash drive slot: very few moving parts.

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#9
August 2, 2011 at 16:51:40
"Mostly for word processing (Word 5.5, GEM and Flexpad)."

Hmm, curious. Did the version of Geoworks on the Geobook not have GeoWrite with it? I always thought that it was almost as good as Microsoft Word 2.0 (the "Word for Windows" version at that time).

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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#10
April 21, 2012 at 19:49:07
-- T-R-A

Sorry for late reply, forgot all about posting this. Yes, it does have Geowrite and it is quite good, but is oriented for good looking output and is almost a desktop publishing program (for it's time). I need idea processors (What You Think Is What You Get as opposed to WYSIWYG) instead of graphics so the plain text program Flexpad by Paul Kramer is used instead. It can organize text by hiding the tab-indented portions, leaving only headers visible, like Python. GEM is used as a task switcher (GEM-XM). The same setup also works on my HP 100LX.


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