Solved Video conversion to HD

January 13, 2016 at 14:26:17
Specs: Winows 8
Can anyone recommend a program that raise the quality on bad quality movies (i.e. 480p -> 720p)? My Mom found some old home movies and I got them on DVD, but the quality is horrible. I understand it won't be perfect, but something is better than nothing. Anyone have any ideas?

20 years in IT and counting, baby
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✔ Best Answer
January 14, 2016 at 15:11:36
Even in broadcast environments we are not able to make poor/low quality material resemble anywhere near HD; often barely able to manage what might be called decent SD standards...

Sadly with the increasing use of internet/broadband video for news footage, and so on - much cheaper than conventional sources/paths - the general public is being steered into accepting lower quality for a lot of stuff they view. Only when they pay for HD will they get the quality they have been used to in the past. Similarly reduced bandwidth HD (720 instead of 1080) over sat links the same cost factor etc. apply.

Satellite bandwidth is cost based; the more you want (and HD uses a lot...) for your higher (preferred?) quality - the more it costs...; and similarly with/for SD - which uses less bandwidth than HD. Many tv stations in USA/Canada use 720 rather than full HD (1080) for their local derived output. They frequently "upscale/convert" their SD to 720 and promote it as HD, implying it's 1080 when it isn't. And the quality difference between "full - 1080 - HD and 720 is very apparent...



#1
January 13, 2016 at 16:50:06
There are different variations of 480p with different aspect ratios. Do you know which you have?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/480p#...

I saw this software mentioned in another forum:

http://download.cnet.com/FormatFact...

message edited by riider


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#2
January 13, 2016 at 17:56:25
How did you transfer the actual film to dvd?

The transfer system - the actual projector and scanner (camera) combination will determine the final quality. If the film is low resolution (16mm? which can sometimes be "ok" and sometimes not, depending on camera and lens that shot it originally), then unless you have access to serious enhancement kit... you won't get anything better than the original quality.

If the scanner unit (a camera of whatever type - hopefully these days a decent ccd or cmos type) is low resolution, then again serious enhancement kit is required.

I have a black and white film/movie (probably just pre-war) which was transfered to dvd. The film/movie would have been released in 35mm, and I doubt it ever went to 16mm. The outfit who transferred it to dvd (and they sell those dvds) certainly didn't produce a dvd that represented the orignal film quality. Either they didn't use a proper telecine transfer system, or didn't know how to line it up properlyy; or else "copied" the film to dvd by pointing a whatever quality tv camera at a screen onto whch the original (35mm?) film was projected?

Many old films previously available on vhs only are being copied to dvd; and unless seriou kit is involved the resultant dvd quality is no better than the original vhs; and in some cases possibly worse. Videotape players vary greatly in quality too so again the dvd copy will be dependent on that.

There are quite a few outfits around now selling poor quality vhs to dvd copies of older films. I have a few dvds of films shot in the 90s, released on vhs - but which were'nt formally released on dvd. Again the vhs copies to dvd are no better than the original vhs; possible worse...

Video processors and upscaling kit (standards converters as generally known in broadcasting circles) can do a little to improve poor resolution video; whether or not one actually changes signal format; but such kit isn't cheap, and it does have its limits...

Video upscaling as used in converting standard resolution (SD) 525/ntsc or 625/pal to HD does a reasonable job - providing you don't push it to far. But the final picture (upscaled) is always dependent on quality of original SD. And if you view the original SD alongside the HD (upscaled version), the difference is very apparent...

"Upscalers" as in many current lcd/led/plasma domestic sets are generally designed to receive/process an SD sgnal (of good quality). Which having said, there are still occasions when broadcasted SD content can leave a lot to be desired... And domestic tv upscalers are no where near those in broadcasting quality wise...

I have yet to see anything (kit/software) in the domestic market that can really convert SD to anything approaching HD.

So... how were the original films transferred to dvd?



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#3
January 14, 2016 at 09:52:07
Thank you both for answering. I am not sure on the method used to transfer the movies from tape to DVD, but he had a device where you can put both in together and it converts it over for you. I didn't think to ask any questions beforehand cause I hadn't seen the film on it.

20 years in IT and counting, baby
\m/ > < \m/


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Related Solutions

#4
January 14, 2016 at 13:10:10
You say tape to dvd in your reply above. In your initial post you refer to (old home ) movies (which usually means film)...

Are these old home movies actually film which was transferred to tape; or recordings on tape made directly with a whatever quality domestic video camera?

And if old home movies were originally film stock, how were they transferred to tape whenever?

Regardless... if the tape content is low quality... then unless you have access to some "serious" enhancement kit (I'm thinking of professional grade) you are really limited to what you have?

A professional company "might" be able to improve the end product; but there will be limits... And it will inevitably cost...?


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#5
January 14, 2016 at 14:48:53
No you will never get anything approaching HD without very expensive software and techniques. Even then you are limited by the quality of the movies themselves.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#6
January 14, 2016 at 15:11:36
✔ Best Answer
Even in broadcast environments we are not able to make poor/low quality material resemble anywhere near HD; often barely able to manage what might be called decent SD standards...

Sadly with the increasing use of internet/broadband video for news footage, and so on - much cheaper than conventional sources/paths - the general public is being steered into accepting lower quality for a lot of stuff they view. Only when they pay for HD will they get the quality they have been used to in the past. Similarly reduced bandwidth HD (720 instead of 1080) over sat links the same cost factor etc. apply.

Satellite bandwidth is cost based; the more you want (and HD uses a lot...) for your higher (preferred?) quality - the more it costs...; and similarly with/for SD - which uses less bandwidth than HD. Many tv stations in USA/Canada use 720 rather than full HD (1080) for their local derived output. They frequently "upscale/convert" their SD to 720 and promote it as HD, implying it's 1080 when it isn't. And the quality difference between "full - 1080 - HD and 720 is very apparent...


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#7
January 15, 2016 at 14:03:24
For future reference - and you might like even to try the whole conversion process yourself; it's not that difficult to do - using your own vhs player and your computer. The results will probably be no worse than what you may already have; "might" even be a little better?

This UK article discusses the basics; and I suspect there are similar articles etc. based on USA/Canadian resources...

http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/how-to/p...

Harking back to your original info - at least the actual footage; you say it's on vhs tape. What you didn't clarify is if the "original" camera footage is film, or a whatever quality video camera?


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#8
January 15, 2016 at 15:00:52
I've used a VHS player and a domestic DVD recorder and the results have not been a great deal different to the original.

Always pop back and let us know the outcome - thanks


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#9
January 15, 2016 at 15:20:20
As per Derek, the simple connect a vhs player to a dvd recorder can produce as good a s result as most facility houses (in the domestic arena) can.

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