Solved HD Video Converter needs 5V plug

October 2, 2012 at 07:43:25
Specs: Windows 7, 4GB RAM
Hi, I have an HD Video Converter - this one here http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1080P-PC-... the problem is I live in the UK but it came with a USA power adapter and a UK travel adapter so I connected it and it worked but only for a few minutes then the plug blew. It says it needs 5V so I bought a UK 5V 2A power adapter since the USA plug says 5V 2A on the back of it but unfortunately the new UK plug I got does not work, the blue light comes on the HD video converter box ok but does not work on the monitor. I tried a multi adapter with different settings for voltages but it does not have one for 5V and it failed to work. What I need is a UK power plug that works for this, can you advise me what plug will work in the UK? Many Thanks.

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✔ Best Answer
October 2, 2012 at 13:55:00
"Do you think it is possible that the HD video converter box needs a 5V 1A to work in the UK instead of a 5V 2A"

No, the device is only going to draw as much current as it needs. You could use a 5 volt 200 amp power supply and it would work. The voltage will need to be the same.

"trying different voltages on a multi adapter it did not work either"

That was a bad idea. If you supplied a voltage higher than 5 volts you could have damaged the device.

Send it back, it has been damaged beyond repair. And don't use a travel adapter, it's most likely the adapter did the damage. Current coming out of the wall socket is AC current in the form of a sine wave. It alternates at 50 hertz in Europe. A sine wave is very smooth when it alternates from positive to negative. Cheap travel adapters use triacs to switch between positive and negative voltages and this produces a square wave. Transformers such as the one on the 5 volt adapter do not handle square waves well. It will produce a much higher voltage on the secondary side of the transformer. That secondary voltage is fed into a voltage regulator to even it out at 5 volts and it's probably the voltage regulation device that popped, also taking the video device with it.

When you get your new device, only use the new converter you bought for the 240 volt. And make sure the voltage and polarity are set correctly.



#1
October 2, 2012 at 08:16:58
If the European plug blew, then it sounds like your device was bad and overloaded it. You also have to watch for correct polarity when you buy replacement power supplies although I don't think this was the issue since you said the blue light came on. It's also possible that when the power supply blew, it took the unit out as well. I would send the whole kit back for a replacement or refund.

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#2
October 2, 2012 at 09:02:49
One 5V 2A PSU is much like any other as long as you have the correct size of plug and the right polarity. I'd agree that most likely blowing the PSU has also knocked out something in the device itself.

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#3
October 2, 2012 at 11:46:28
Thanks for the help. Do you think it is possible that the HD video converter box needs a 5V 1A to work in the UK instead of a 5V 2A? Is it possible that some devices do not work with power supplies that have too high amps and needs to strictly be 1A? The reason I say this is because, the blue light comes on still but does not detect on the monitor and trying different voltages on a multi adapter it did not work either, I still believe that the box works OK it just seems to be very picky about the power adapter and I read on another site that it needs to use a USA power adapter with a converter to the UK in order to work so surely there must be a UK power adapter I can use that will work? I had it connected to a surge protector but the USA adapter was connected to this cheap travel adapter when it blew - http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/3-PIN-UNI...

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Related Solutions

#4
October 2, 2012 at 13:55:00
✔ Best Answer
"Do you think it is possible that the HD video converter box needs a 5V 1A to work in the UK instead of a 5V 2A"

No, the device is only going to draw as much current as it needs. You could use a 5 volt 200 amp power supply and it would work. The voltage will need to be the same.

"trying different voltages on a multi adapter it did not work either"

That was a bad idea. If you supplied a voltage higher than 5 volts you could have damaged the device.

Send it back, it has been damaged beyond repair. And don't use a travel adapter, it's most likely the adapter did the damage. Current coming out of the wall socket is AC current in the form of a sine wave. It alternates at 50 hertz in Europe. A sine wave is very smooth when it alternates from positive to negative. Cheap travel adapters use triacs to switch between positive and negative voltages and this produces a square wave. Transformers such as the one on the 5 volt adapter do not handle square waves well. It will produce a much higher voltage on the secondary side of the transformer. That secondary voltage is fed into a voltage regulator to even it out at 5 volts and it's probably the voltage regulation device that popped, also taking the video device with it.

When you get your new device, only use the new converter you bought for the 240 volt. And make sure the voltage and polarity are set correctly.


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#5
October 2, 2012 at 16:11:16
I agree with THX1138; the travel-adapter sounds like the culprit and likely didn't step down the voltage properly to the input of the 5 Volt adapter. The power adapters themselves are also quite possibly of suspect quality, I'd make sure (with a voltmeter) that you're getting a good 5 Volts out of the one you purchase---though you may have to add a load to it to determine for sure...

"Channeling the spirit of jboy..."


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