will a i7 cpu fit in a i5 cpu or are the sockets different

June 17, 2014 at 11:02:36
Specs: winfows, i5
I have a i7 cpu that i havent used but will it fit in my computer that is using a i5 cpu. Will they fit each other or are the sockets different.

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#1
June 17, 2014 at 11:41:18
There are several different socket possibilities - 1150, 1155, 1156, 1366, 2011. Can you be more specific about the CPUs? Which i5 & which i7 are you asking about?

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#2
June 17, 2014 at 20:04:38
Im sorry i cant give you much information all i know is the cpu in my desktop now is intel I5 and the new one is from intel and its an I7. I have no idea how to find or where to look to find out if they are both the same socket or if they are different. Thank you all who have responded so far in advance. Sorry i cant give much information on my cpu's.

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#3
June 18, 2014 at 04:44:12
Can't help you without knowing what you have. Here's the lists of CPUs from wikipedia:

List of Intel Core i5 microprocessors

List of Intel Core i7 microprocessors


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Related Solutions

#4
June 18, 2014 at 19:09:39
Right click on Computer (Windows 7 and before) and choose Properties and your installed CPU model number should be listed. It is also listed in Device Manager under Processors (All Windows).
If you have a new CPU it will be listed on the packaging as well as on the CPU itself.
If you are not sure what numbers are needed, post all of them.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#5
July 27, 2014 at 01:30:14
If you don't have the knowledge (or the effort) to actually find out your CPU model beforehand, I highly doubt you'll be capable of replacing the CPU in the first place without external help. It takes finesse and knowhow to successfully replace a CPU without FUBAR'ing the pins or thermal paste job. It ain't hard, but there sure is one heck of a lot that's there to screw up.

Like above posters said, there's lots of different sockets. You could try CPU-Z as it keeps a lot of info right up front, iff you're still pursuing this.

~oldie
Not everyone can decipher Klingon script...
chay' ta' SoH tlhe' vam Doch Daq


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#6
August 22, 2014 at 18:41:41
Upgrading the CPU really isn't as difficult as people like to think it is. Oldie isn't incorrect in saying it takes finesse as the pins can be easily bent or broken -- should this happen, you may consider yourself thoroughly screwed -- but it's not rocket science either. It's not gonna explode if you don't keep it level or move it too quickly. It just takes some common sense and a little research. If Fingers' suggestion didn't help, try opening your case up and taking a peek at the MoBo. Just be careful not to touch the circuits. Every MoBo I've seen has had the socket type printed on it somewhere. I can't guarantee it'll be on yours, but there's still a good chance you'll find your answer there since the CPU has to match the MoBo. Example: My MoBo is an ASRock Z87 (1150 socket) My CPU is an Intel core i5-4670k (also 1150 socket) I could have had an i7 if I wanted, because my MoBo supports it, but I opted for extended warranties and a case with the best price/potential balance. I will probably upgrade to an i7 when I am in a better financial position. Whatever CPU I ended up with, the sockets had to match -- that's the important part. You definitely don't want to start anything until you know what socket your MoBo is. I hope we help you find it. Also, CPU's usually come with an adequate application of thermal paste, so you don't really need to worry about that.

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#7
August 23, 2014 at 18:58:48
" Also, CPU's usually come with an adequate application of thermal paste, so you don't really need to worry about that. " -> WRONG!!
CPU's do NOT come with thermal compound applied. On new desktop CPU's that come with a new heat sink, the heat sink often comes with a pre-applied thermal material. All other thermal material that may be on a CPU or heat sink that has been previously used needs to be removed and new material applied whenever reusing either or both.
Please note that the original poster (OP) has not replied since June so we generally consider these posts as being abandoned.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
August 24, 2014 at 12:13:14
Well then I guess there's no need to nitpick about TP then, is there?

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