Solved Why could my liquid cooling system overheating

June 7, 2014 at 15:33:45
Specs: Windows 8.1 pro
I built a customize computer and decided due the type of processor I would go with liquid cooling in the event I wanted to overclock the cpu. its baseline specs are AMD 9590 8-core 4.7GHz cpu with 32GB of system memory and 6TB hdd running the thermltake "Bigwater 760 Pro" cooling system. I first liquid installed kept it between 42-48C but had to replace due a leak at the cooling radiator/ liquid storage tank. I have replaced the system twice has it is covered on the manufacturer's warranty. because it overheats after idling ten mins (60-70c) before the system's powers itself down in normal mode and jst a few seconds overclocked to 5.1GHZ. I am using the manufacturer's suggested cooling solution.

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#1
June 7, 2014 at 20:53:30
✔ Best Answer
Water pump 'fan' setting needs to be at 100% fixed.
Actual fan(s) should be connected to CPU Fan port and set to automatic.
Air bubble in water line can be cause.
Too much thermal compound under waterblock can be the cause of poor thermal transfer
Too high a voltage on overclock can cause excess heat. List all CPU settings so someone more familiar with AMD can comment on your settings.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#2
June 8, 2014 at 18:18:49
Nice setup. Let me know how that 32 gigs of sys. memory is.

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#3
June 9, 2014 at 05:00:49
"Nice setup"

It's only a nice setup if it works. And I'm curious what the system is used for that would require 32GB RAM.


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#4
June 9, 2014 at 07:05:29
The case has three fans on it two pushing air out and one pulling air in. Before the original unit started to leak the system ran beautifully. Nearly zero wait time on any application (where there was any wait time, it was under three seconds). The water pump is set to max and is connected to the main cpu fan jacket on the system board. The CPU setting are all set to auto as I thought it would be best to leave it set to it. When it is overclocked the ratio is set to 22.5. The cpu pull 225 watts of power in itself (I knew this before building and installed an 1000 watt power supply.) What setting to you need to know and I will gather them for you?. The idea behind the 32GB of memory is rather basic. In general every three years I build a new computer, however this time I wanted one that could in theory handle everything given it over the next seven years. This include service as an file server, gaming system, full home surround sound system (8.1 digital) just to name a few. I will change the amount of paste has it is a thin layer of covering the entire cpu to just covering the cooling block.

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#5
June 9, 2014 at 12:52:11
That's what I meant, was being sarcastic.

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#6
June 10, 2014 at 06:28:29
Without making any changes to the system I noticed the CPU was running in the low to mid 40s so I let it run two days and recorded the sensor feed in which the system got up to 49 and drop back down to 41. I will run the system in normal mode for a week and then overclock it to see what happens. I'll post again when I have some news.

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#7
June 10, 2014 at 16:06:16
Cooling block fan should be on the CPU Fan terminal so its speed is tied tot he CPU temperature. The pump can be on any Fan port as long as it can be set to all of the time. If you do not have enough fan ports, some of them that are identical can be paired together with a Y connector to increase the number of fans you can use. Otherwise, you have enough fans to get the job done.
Look here to see the best way to apply the thermal compound for each CPU:
http://www.arcticsilver.com/amd_app...
Your temps are much more reasonable though.

32GB RAM is probably overkill, 16GB should have been plenty, but more memory cannot hurt, though it sometimes hurts the max overclocking the board can handle.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#8
June 11, 2014 at 19:47:10
cooling system has a single connection for power, so I connected it to the CPU main. after running three days non-stop the CPU is at 37 and system board is at 34. think I am in good shape again. thanks for the pointers.

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#9
June 12, 2014 at 20:20:14
Good to hear you are on track. The temps look good and could tolerate some overclocking if/when you are ready.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#10
June 15, 2014 at 11:44:10
Ok I ran it in overclock mode (5.1Ghz) and it overheated after about seven mins. Run fine in normal mode. so I decided just to keep it in normal mode (4.7Ghz).

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#11
June 15, 2014 at 18:30:47
Its probably a better choice for you, but overclocking is not properly done by just switching modes like flipping a switch, it is a number of manual steps that are taken one at a time in order to achieve the proper overclock for you and your machine. A general mode would have to ensure that it would be 'stable' while ignoring many subtle differences in hardware and individual slices of silicon and therefor would probably 'choose' a higher core voltage than is really necessary which would make it run hotter.
As I said before, IF you really want to try overclocking it the right way, start a new post and include details about all of your hardware and your general uses for the machine and riider or someone else familiar with OC'ing AMD CPU machines will offer some suggested settings and starting points. In the mean time, read up on it online by Googling the model of your CPU, motherboard, and the word 'Overclock' to begin to understand it better.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


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#12
June 16, 2014 at 19:01:12
I used the overclocking software that came with the Asus system board. It overclocked it by 8% running at 5.1GHZ.

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#13
June 17, 2014 at 19:52:11
I assumed that but in order for it 'always' to work, it has to use the most stable voltage settings and that usually means higher settings than are probably needed in most cases which in tern means more heat generated. It is best to overclock manually and in steps. In general, you increase a certain setting or two, possibly reducing or disabling something else, and test for stability. If stable, you try a little bit higher. If not stable, you increase a particular voltage by a tiny amount or reduce the overclock and test again. Repeating this until you achieve the best balance of speed and temperature with tested stability. You do all of this with certain monitoring programs and stress testing programs. If you really are interested, you will need to read about overclocking in general and your CPU/motherboard combination specifically. Then you start a new post and list all of your hardware and some of your new guesses on where to start and there will be someone who will be able to steer you right on things and probably give you specific starting points and a list of the next step or two from there.
Edit: I have not read these, just Googled them so I make no warranty on the contents:
http://www.tomshardware.com/answers...
http://linustechtips.com/main/topic...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mcke...
Edit: Some software for monitoring:
http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-...
http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmo...

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.

message edited by Fingers


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