Solved which is better Heatsink Thermal Silicone pad or greese

September 23, 2012 at 15:56:59
Specs: Windows 7 64bit, athlon 2 4c 620/4gig
which is better Heatsink Cooling Thermal Conductive Silicone Pad or the greese? I just got a athlon 2 quad 4 620 2.6ghz proc used off ebay and I used the standard greese but it runs a little too hot so thinking I put too much on I reapplied with less still running at idle lowest is about 130f and reaches 142 then my fan kick in at high speed (stock fan very loud) for about 2min till it comes down to 130f then returns to normal

Im using the stock heatsink and fan that came with my hp with a amd athlon 2 215 duel core and looks identical as the stock on that come with the athon 2 quad

(ie) it looks like the one in this link http://www.ebay.com/itm/AMD-Heat-Si...



I was told to get one thats for my quad but dont want to wast money if Ill just be getting the same one. Is their a diff in the one for the duel core vs quad core but look the same or do I most likely have one thats made for the quad? '

Returning to my original question since Im running hot would I get better cooling if I use the pad? If yes are their one you reccomend since I assume they have diff heat transfer rates and then just invest in a better fan rather than both? I have the 3 pin which one would give me better cooling and alot less noise vs the stock one that sound like a small aircraft is taking off in my comp.

Ive had the procc in and have had the comp running for two days to while ive been watching the temp it has never gone above 145f but it never runs below 128f since thats close to the 71c max temp listied for this proc but I am unshure if this is considered acceptabe or not and before you respond with "did you clean the heatsink or did you use new greese and the correct amount or did the heat sink have dust on it, who would leave dust all over the heatsink or use old greese or none at all lets assume that I have half a brain and half more experience than your average cp users (even though its self tought knowlege) its quality self tought knowlage!!??

See More: which is better Heatsink Thermal Silicone pad or greese

Report •

✔ Best Answer
September 26, 2012 at 02:49:47
Thermal pads are no longer used on CPU's but i have seen with my own eyes a thermal pad used to fill the gap between GPU and heatsink, the pads were used in two HP laptop which suffer from GPU overheating(HP tx1000).
Mostly thermal pads are used on memory chips especially on video cards.

Thermal Compound Roundup - February 2012
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/prin...

If u decide to replace the heatsink go for a tower heatsink , take the one with 120mm fan if u don't want too much noise.

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.



#1
September 23, 2012 at 16:09:51
All AMD CPUs use the "middle dot" method. If you applied the paste any differently, remove the heatsink, clean off all traces of the used paste, then apply a fresh dab about the size of a grain of rice in the center of the CPU.

Here's a pic: http://www.gophermods.com/images/gm...


Report •

#2
September 23, 2012 at 16:28:18
thanks thats good info for anyone that does not not know that but I question was more spacific as too which one will work better even if its a small amount, Im just trying to do the things that are less exspensive first. So that I wont have to buy a heatsink that almost cost as much as the processor; cause I plan on buying a larger one in the near future. I only bought this one cause I got it for $36 on ebay couldnt really pass it up fully expecting my original heat sink is the exact same one that is stock for it

Report •

#3
September 23, 2012 at 18:02:48
I do not believe that thermal pads are better, I believe that thermal compound is better. Thermal pads are mainly for factory assembly and sometimes for shipping with the product since it becomes impossible to apply too much like it is with thermal compound.
I do not know whether the dual and quads come with the same heat sinks, but it is very possible that they do not. They might look alike but they may have either a greater mass of aluminum, a copper insert, or more fins as well as possibly a fan with greater CFM's. I know on some of the Intel Core 2 quads they did something like this since I got one of them when I purchased a used CPU once from someone who upgraded to a quad and was not using the stock heat sink.
Again, I do not use AMD's but your temperatures do sound very high and if reapplying the compound does not fix this and your BIOS is set right for your CPU, then you will have to do something right away about this. Especially check your CPU core voltage to see that it is set correctly and not for some older CPU that was in there before.
In the future, please report temperatures in Degrees C not F since it has been the working temps with computers for a long time and we will recognize normal and high much more easily.
I run overclocked CPU's in the mid 30C to low 40C at idle and 40C's to mid 50C's under load. Much higher than that will shorten the life of your CPU.
The high fan speeds is in response to the high internal temperatures and if they do not come down, the fan will continue to scream its guts out trying to cool it down. This will also shorten the fan's life.

You have to be a little bit crazy to keep you from going insane.


Report •

Related Solutions

#4
September 23, 2012 at 19:53:51
I don't know what you want to hear? Paste or pad makes little difference but if paste is used, it MUST be applied correctly. You haven't explained which method you used but if it was anything other than "middle dot", it was done incorrectly. The difference between the X2 & X4 is wattage. The X2 215 is a 65W CPU, the X4 620 is a 95W CPU. You need a cooler better suited for the higher wattage CPU.

http://www.arcticsilver.com/PDF/app...

To prevent confusion, temps should be reported in Celsius.

128F = approx 53C
130F = approx 54C
142F = approx 61C
145F = approx 63C

Have a look at this: http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?in...


Report •

#5
September 25, 2012 at 01:39:52
I use whatever is preapplied or if nothing is there, I use cheapo Radio Shack paste applied according to the Arctic Silver instructions.

I've killed motherboards testing TIM's and never seen 2°C difference in any of it.

Secret is clean the processor, clean the heatsink, and follow instructions.

If the stock heatsink/fan ain't gonna work for you, do some research to find a good aftermarket unit. Spend the bucks to own it and follow the instructions to install it properly.

Like riider said, 95W makes more heat than 65W. A 65W cooling solution on a 95W processor is, therefore, not a real good idea.

Another not so swell deal is to spend 36 bucks on a processor and then have to spend just as much to cool it. Probably could have bought a new boxed set for the same money.

More processing power means more heat. Makes little difference if you change out the part or if you overclock. More heat means you need a better cooling solution. A better cooling solution means you spend more money.

That said, you still have to follow instructions.

Skip
Audares Juvo


Report •

#6
September 26, 2012 at 02:49:47
✔ Best Answer
Thermal pads are no longer used on CPU's but i have seen with my own eyes a thermal pad used to fill the gap between GPU and heatsink, the pads were used in two HP laptop which suffer from GPU overheating(HP tx1000).
Mostly thermal pads are used on memory chips especially on video cards.

Thermal Compound Roundup - February 2012
http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/prin...

If u decide to replace the heatsink go for a tower heatsink , take the one with 120mm fan if u don't want too much noise.

You know the real meaning of peace only if you have been through the war.


Report •

#7
September 26, 2012 at 11:58:58
Loved that link kuwese...hadn't seen it before. +1 old friend.

The stuff smeared on my boxed 3870K hsf worked just fine. Nothing I've done so far has recorded a temp over 70°C @ 100x34 and 847Mhz gpu.

The Arctic Silver folks are about a half hour drive south of me. About 10 years ago, I set up a little tour with them and left with some samples of their products...good stuff all but, not so wonderful as to replace my old $1.99 tubes of Radio Shack paste. I did love the adhesive for attaching little heat sinks to MOSFET, GPU, and other dinky little chips.

Skip
Audares Juvo


Report •

Ask Question